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How does grade scale affect auto scholarships?

fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
We are aware that Temple offers scholarships based, partly, on GPA. The highest one requires a 3.8 GPA. I presume that is the unweighted GPA, but that is question 1? Question 2 pertains to grading scale and how GPA is calculated. Imagine a hypothetical Pottsgrove student who has a 3.5 GPA in our current 7 point scale. In that scale, a 92 is a B. In our new scale starting next year, a 92 would be an A-. If that student’s grades were retroactively converted to the 10 point scale, imagine that his/her GPA rose to 3.8. The number grades aren’t any different, just the meaning of those numbers. Would this student be ineligible for the highest temple scholarship if OUR computed GPA is a 3.5 and would he/she become eligible if OUR GPA were 3.8; OR does temple use the profile and calculate GPA using its own definitions?
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Replies to: How does grade scale affect auto scholarships?

  • woogzmamawoogzmama Registered User Posts: 3,850 Senior Member
    I think it would be entirely reasonable to address this question to an admissions officer. It's a large university, and they must receive many inquiries of this sort.
  • fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
    Asked and answer is never a yes or no. Always vague.

    "We look at high school grades within the school's profile and our own conversions to determine scholarships" was the only answer they would give
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    i suggest they apply as soon as possible so they have time to appeal if they do not get desired scholarship esp as the grading scale is in process of changing in a way that benefits students more. also, it appears Temple weighs certain classes, so the GPA might go up some then too once Temple weights(assuming Temple weighs some of this student's classes). i am sure you have already figured out Temple only uses core classes in calculating the GPA
  • fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
    @ctl987 Core yes, but do you know how they weight? That I haven't found.

    All courses taken (except gym and health which Temple doesn't count anyway) have either been honors or AP.
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    that i am not sure as my kid only had one weighted class when he was offered the scholarship. i know back in my day. my weighted B's counted as A's. perhaps they do the same thing. did you contact honors and ask them about how Temple weighs? they may be able to give you some tips you;d find helpful. i think i saw on another thread your unweighted GPa is 3.5? do you know what your weighted GPA is? what are your grades in the core classes and how does your school weigh the AP/honors classes? is your school's weighing formula evident on your transcipt. i know many of the kids in honors with my son had a lot more AP/honors classes than he did and however Temple calculated their grades, many of them got either the top or second highest scholarship. My impression is Temple tries to be reasonable and work things to your favor but that is just my impression.
  • fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
    edited June 2015
    My son has had one 90 and four 92% grades throughout HS. All in either honors or AP classes. Also, all other grades were 93 or higher in percentage.

    We use a 7 point scale and only percentage. The school weights honors at 5% and AP classes as 10% over their grade. His unweighted percentage is 96 and weighted percentage is 101%.

    I am trying to figure which level of scholarship he would qualify for. He has a 32 ACT score and currently waiting for June's score. The web page says 3.8 GPA for highest level. If all his 92 and the one 90 count as a B then his GPA is 3.71.
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    i am thinking his gpa will be 4.0 with what you said. i def recomend you contact honors and talk to them. with his academic strengths, they would love to have him at Temple and i think can reassure you. even if they cannot get into precise details on what his gpa would be(and perhaps they can on that too), they will know more than me on this. a phone contact is probably the best way to go. is 32 still what is needed to for teh ACT to get top scholly? and congrats to your son for great stats! where else is he looking and does he have an intended major yet?
  • fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
    edited June 2015
    @ctl987 according to the website a 3.8 and 32 ACT give an automatic full tuition scholarship.

    As for other colleges: applying to Ohio state, penn state, Pittsburgh, North Carolina state, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia.
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    wow. lots of good options then! mine did not get any money at pitt with similar stats but less AP's than your kid. it unofficially sounds like pitt uses the English and math score for their ACT calculations so if your kid is high in those areas(i'd say at least a 32 in those 2 subareas), a Pitt scholly is possible(probably only partial though). i've heard ohio state is very generous wiht merit aid. i think the same holds true for at least some of the other schools. not so sure about Va and PSU is rumoredly tight wiht merit aid but i have heard about exceptions who got a nice packet there too. and i think from above posts, your kid is a pa resident?
  • fflmasterfflmaster Registered User Posts: 212 Junior Member
    Yes PA resident. Yes we don't expect much if any from either Pitt or Penn State. That is why he is looking out of state as well.
  • mstompermstomper Registered User Posts: 1,017 Senior Member
    My son might squeak by if they do weighted. His unweighted GPA is under 3.5, but all his classes are honors or AP. He's well above the cutoff with his SAT. Temple might be a more affordable alternative to Drexel (which is unaffordable unless the NM folks don't notice his D's in English).
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    mstomper, have him apply to Temple early, that way, he can appeal if he does not get top scholly, i think jan 15th has been appeal deadline in the past.

    the nm folks probably will notice the D's... :/ is his psat score in nm range? and your son should be in pretty good boding for the second tier scholarship at Temple which is still very generous if he misses top one, have you gotten on Temple's website to see which courses they look at to calculate gpa(it's math, english, and 3 other core topics, presumably sciences, and social studies in there too).
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    Only academic courses are considered (English, social studies, mathematics,
    sciences and languages).

    http://admissions.temple.edu/sites/admissions/files/uploads/15_16_ADM_Scholarship_APP_proof4bFINAL (1).pdf

    good info on my reply here for anyone considering Temple in near future
  • mstompermstomper Registered User Posts: 1,017 Senior Member
    I'm sure the D's will be noticed. He's probably safely in NMSF territory. The cutoff in our state would have to be 4 points higher than last year and a couple points higher than it's ever been for him to not make it. His SAT CR+M is 1460. His failure to turn in work he didn't want to do will cost him. Unfortunate, but a life lesson he needs to learn.
  • ctl987ctl987 Registered User Posts: 1,466 Senior Member
    live and learn, taht is a hard lesson cause he could have gotten a full ride at some schools with the nm scholarship. still, he's clearly bright enough to excel at many colleges.
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