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Report: Students Who Transfer From Community College to 4-Year Schools Show Excellent Outcomes

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Replies to: Report: Students Who Transfer From Community College to 4-Year Schools Show Excellent Outcomes

  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 56,853 Senior Member
    Is that because those schools are bigger than other "most selective" colleges, and the TAG program?
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 75,360 Senior Member
    edited January 16
    About half of the students nationwide who transfer from community college to Most Selective colleges transfer to Berkeley or UCLA.
    jym626 wrote:
    Is that because those schools are bigger than other "most selective" colleges, and the TAG program?

    UCB and UCLA are large, and also much more transfer-friendly than other highly selective universities (including many public ones). UCs generally target having a third of bachelor's degree graduates starting college at community college and entering the UC by transfer. This is much higher than at other highly selective universities.

    But note that UCB and UCLA do not do TAG: http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/transfer/guarantee/index.html
  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang Registered User Posts: 17,967 Senior Member
    It's because California has a good community college program and encourages transfers from community college to state schools. It's easy for a community college student to find out what classes transfer, community colleges have frequent transfer events, students can make certain contracts that guarantee that they will be accepted as transfer students if they complete certain classes with certain grades, and four-year colleges save places for transfers. Other states do not do these things.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 26,277 Senior Member
    The OP says community college student transfers do well when they are admitted to elites, period.

    Not quite; the OP actually says that cc students do better, i.e, "higher grad. rates". (see the title of the thread.) It is that conclusion that I raise an issue with.


  • Dave_BerryDave_Berry CC Admissions Expert Posts: 2,853 Senior Member
    "New analysis from Jack Kent Cooke Foundation highlights community college students as promising admissions pool for selective four-year institutions.

    A new report, "Persistence: The Success of Students Who Transfer from Community Colleges to Selective Four-Year Institutions," released today by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, shows that community college students who transfer to selective four-year institutions perform as well as—or better than—their peers who enrolled directly from high school.

    The graduation rates of community college transfer students match or exceed those of students who start at four-year institutions as freshmen. Community college students graduate at higher rates than students who transfer from other four-year institutions." ...

    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/community-college-transfer-students-more-likely-to-graduate-than-traditional-students-at-selective-colleges-300778726.html
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 12,561 Senior Member
    I'm not seeing the difference between "do well" and "do better" @bluebayou - isn't having a higher grad rate than students who started at the 4 year as frosh or transferred after one year considered "doing better"? Or "well"?
  • mackinawmackinaw Registered User Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    This does not surprise me. Way back when I interviewed for my first academic job at a state university in the South, an academic dean told me that students who came to the university after graduating from a "junior" college were more likely to graduate than students who first arrived on campus right out of high school. His explanation was that those "transfer" students on average were more highly focused and motivated to earn their bachelor's degree. So there's a "selection effect": students who went the community/junior college route AND SUCCEEDED were hard working and generally had a good idea what they wanted to study at the major university. It's not that they were smarter, but they were goal oriented.
  • ccprofandmomof2ccprofandmomof2 Registered User Posts: 420 Member
    Agree with @mackinaw . The completion rate for CC students hoping to transfer is generally pretty horrendous. I think you need to remember that as context, particularly if we are taking this study and using it as evidence to recommend that students who could get into a four-year university go to CC just to save money. There are so many students who start with that plan who don't make it through CC and never get the chance to prove themselves at a university.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 56,853 Senior Member
    I also wonder if they compared the # of t students who transferred in as a sophomore or junior to cohorts who were sophomores or juniors at the 4 year institution, rather than those who started as freshmen. That might better compare apples to apples, eliminating those who washed out after freshman year.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 75,360 Senior Member
    particularly if we are taking this study and using it as evidence to recommend that students who could get into a four-year university go to CC just to save money.

    Some CC students may be there to save money because they have no other financially realistic choice. Such students may be the most vulnerable to financial drop out, or not being able to transfer because four year school is still too expensive.

    Analogous situations exist for those with weaker high school records.

    So those who do transfer exclude those with the worst financial situations and those who were unable to handle college academic work, who have dropped out already or decided not to transfer.
  • mackinawmackinaw Registered User Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    edited January 17
    ucb: that link doesn't work for me.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 75,360 Senior Member
    edited January 17
    Looks like the active thread referenced in #26 got merged into this one by the moderators, so it no longer exists as a separate thread. The posts in that other thread are replies #1 through #25 (except #20) of this thread now (reply #1 was post #0 of the other thread).
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