Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
bluirinkabluirinka Registered User Posts: 2,056 Senior Member
edited June 2005 in Tufts University
Here's where we can discuss what we plan to study, what classes we've heard are good and bad. Any input from current Tufts students would be greatly appreciated. How should we choose classes? Based on when the finals are, lol?
Post edited by bluirinka on
«1

Replies to: Classes!

  • thegreatgatsbythegreatgatsby Registered User Posts: 161 Junior Member
    Premed for me-- the usual bio, chem, phys, orgo classes.
  • abs294abs294 Registered User Posts: 110 Junior Member
    I based a lot of my class choices on what looked interesting and on which professors/courses had good reputations. www.ratemyprofessors.com, and www.tuftsreviews.com are two good sites that help with that.

    Start taking requirements early, if you leave them for too late, you might get stuck with something you don't want to take but have to to fill the requirement.
  • ariesathenaariesathena Registered User Posts: 5,087 Senior Member
    Also, if you wait too long to take your distribution requirements, you'll have to take something whenever it is scheduled, even if it conflicts with other classes that you would love to take.

    Consider taking AP credit, if possible, to free up room in your schedule.

    If you have ANY inkling that you would want to study language in depth (or something else requiring a lot of prerequisistes, such as math or physics or chem), then take those courses early on. You don't want to realize that math would be a great major for you, but you have to take three courses in one semester so that you can graduate on time. Basically, some majors have required courses that have a ton of sequenced pre-reqs, so you have to get started early.

    Re-cap for the new people on the board: I'm an '03 engineering graduate who did a second major in liberal arts.
  • sasa045sasa045 Registered User Posts: 24 New Member
    Your advisors and peer advisors during orientation will help a lot with this stuff and if they don't volenteer the info, just ask! Or ask any upperclassman as well.
  • bluirinkabluirinka Registered User Posts: 2,056 Senior Member
    yeah i've def. heard that about requirements. which kind of sucks, because even though i'm interested in IR and Poli Sci, i feel as though there is SO MUCH i could potentially study...but like, i really don't feel like continuing Calc. if i can get out of it with my AP credits, what can I take instead? wouldn't they just put me in the next highest Calc class?

    Because...i still shiver at the mention of "Taylor polynomials" (shudder lol)
  • sasa045sasa045 Registered User Posts: 24 New Member
    you have to complete 2 math requirements. If you pass out of one with ap then you have to just take one more. You can take a comp sci course, any stats course (some are offered in other depts like psych and sociology), and many other math courses. Unless it is a prereq for some other class you want to take, you don't have to take calc.
  • tufta08tufta08 Registered User Posts: 79 Junior Member
    Fulfill the requirements early!!! I can't stress that enough. :)
  • 1stgensane1stgensane Registered User Posts: 62 Junior Member
    I went to a private hs with a lot of distribution requirements and like you advise, plowed through most of them early. I am not a math and science person so I focused more on getting those out of the way and didn't worry too much about the areas I knew I'd want to study later on regardless. I was hoping to do something similar at Tufts. Can we meet dist. requirements and major requirements with the same classes?

    (Here's wishing I took AP exams...)
  • tufta08tufta08 Registered User Posts: 79 Junior Member
    It really depends on your major and what classes you choose. It did work for me: for example, my sociocultural anthropology class fulfilled both a humanities distribution requirement and a societies/culture requirement for my MAJOR, international relations. If you plan it correctly, you can make it work. As for the courses I took to fulfill math, they didn't count, naturally, for anything but math distribution.
  • snufflessnuffles Registered User Posts: 1,147 Senior Member
    Gah you freshman are SOOOO lucky! Professor Morse left Tufts! Now chem 1 and 2 are no longer harder than the honors chemistry...damn luck!
  • thegreatgatsbythegreatgatsby Registered User Posts: 161 Junior Member
    Wow. Where is Professor Morse going? Do you know who is teaching chem 1 and chem 2 now?

    By the way, how did you find out?
  • thegreatgatsbythegreatgatsby Registered User Posts: 161 Junior Member
    According to the registrar, he is still teaching chem 1 and chem 2 though. Did he just abruptly decide to leave?
  • snufflessnuffles Registered User Posts: 1,147 Senior Member
    News of his leaving spread like wildfire within hours of his departure via AIM. Within a few days (during the summer!), most people who had his class knew that he was gone. Not quite the equivalent of the "ding dong the witch is dead," but more of a disappointment that the tradition of chemistry 1 and 2 suffering has now been broken. Apparently he wanted a job with more promotional development. He invested like an immense portion of his time in undergraduate teaching and almost nothing on research, which makes it virtually impossible for him to get tenure. The system for college profs suck, but that's the way things work.
  • thegreatgatsbythegreatgatsby Registered User Posts: 161 Junior Member
    >Not quite the equivalent of the "ding dong the witch is dead,"

    lol

    Do you know if Tufts is hiring a new chemistry professor, or are they getting someone else from the chemistry department to teach it?
  • Private_JokerPrivate_Joker Registered User Posts: 812 Member
    "He invested like an immense portion of his time in undergraduate teaching..."

    Was he a good teacher? I wonder if all Tufts profs invest a lot of time teaching and how many are actually good at teaching undergrads.
«1
This discussion has been closed.