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Thinking about going to KCL?

LoveforLitLoveforLit Registered User Posts: 51 Junior Member
edited July 2013 in United Kingdom
I am aware of the basic admissions policies of UK universities (mostly looking at APs and SATs) and I am confident that I will fit the requirements. However, even after spending very much time on research, I am still left with questions.
1. How long would you say in an accommodation?
2. People are always saying how expensive it is. When I look at, for example, tuition, it is around $23,000. I look at Boston University as my top US school, and it is almost $40k. Of course, dorm/accommodations, books, and other necessities count into the costs of living as a college student. What is it that makes people so sure that UK is more expensive than US in terms of expenses?
3. If I am sure I want to live in England for adulthood, where do I start?
4. Is it worth it? I would study international relations no matter what school I would attend and always thought that it is the perfect subject to study internationally.
5. Because UK schools usually only let students study one subject at university, I am worried about not being able to study a language(s). Would an international relations student be able to study another language, or do the school programs still restrict that?
6. Because there is no FA, how does the scholarship system work?
Post edited by LoveforLit on

Replies to: Thinking about going to KCL?

  • nordicbluenordicblue Registered User Posts: 171 Junior Member
    1. I'm not sure what you are asking. KCL has a detailed student accommodation website (google it), it lists all the different types of accommodation, facilities and prices. I believe the average person stays in university halls (or dorms) for around 40 weeks in the first year.
    2. Fees are usually less, living costs are usually a lot more. Do your own sums.
    3. You wont be able to stay in the UK after you finish studying unless you get sponsored to work there, and that is incredibly unlikely.
    4. I don't know, only you can answer that.
    5. Most universities let students take a language as part of their degree, check individual degree programmes and the course options. Most universities also have a language centre where you can learn language in your free time.
    6. Most scholarship are for postgrads, a few are available for undergrads but they're very small (maybe £500 or less), if you are relying on a scholarship to study in the UK then forget about it.
  • TheRealKEVPTheRealKEVP - Posts: 986 Member
    London is a very expensive place to live, or even visit. Outside of London, England is much cheaper. London is particularly expensive if you don't know the "tricks" to saving money. There are London business who make their money by overcharging clueless foreigners, while the "locals" know where to buy things cheaply.

    If you are studying international relations, you may end up working in the United Kingdom (or some other country) as a representative of the United States Government or an American corporation. Is this what your goal is? Or you were you hoping to somehow work in the UK for the UK government or a UK corporation as an international relations expert? I don't see how that would work.

    I think it is possible that you may have to find time on your own to study additional languages. I once knew a Priest who went to seminary in the UK, and he thought he would be taught Greek to study the New Testament. It took him a while to realize that they were expecting him to study Greek on his own.

    KEVP
  • MeIsHMMeIsHM Registered User Posts: 316 Member
    1. Have a look at the KCL Acommodation website. Acommodation can vary; it can cost $10-18,000, depending which housing you get
    2. It is not always more expensive to study in the UK, but foreign students do not get any financial aid. Tuition is considerably more expensive for laboratory- or clinically-based programs.
    3. Foreign students may not usually work in the UK during their stay. It is very difficult to obtain a immigration visa, but this is something you should discuss with a lawyer.
    4. We cannot answer that for you, but if you are interested in pursuing a career in the public sector of a different country, you should normally study in that country.
    5. You can apply for a specific program in which you study a language, e.g. International Relations with/and German. Bear in mind that the term WITH indicates a 67/33 split, and the term AND indicates a 50/50 split.
    6. Scholarships for foreign students in the UK are very limited, and are usually merit-based, so you should NOT rely on them under any circumstances. If you are a U.S. student, you may be eligible for some aid from your state and federal government.
  • uscamstudentuscamstudent Registered User Posts: 108 Junior Member
    2. I can't speak for KCL which probably has a higher cost of living (London is ungodly expensive to live in) but at Cambridge I would pay 43,500$ per year (includes accomadation but not food). This is less than many of my friends are paying in the US. So you're right, it's not such a horrible deal. Do be aware that it's much harder to gain scholarships for going abroad and they won't lower their fees based on your financial status (like financial aid in the us). I don't know about KCL but some schools do offer aid to international students, you have to check with the school.
    3. Actually MeISHM I just had to as a UKBA person about this today. Apparently you're allowed a part time job during terms while on your Tier 4 Visa and you can have a full time job during term breaks. In terms of staying in the UK permanently, having studied there isn't any help in the application process for a work Visa (Tier 2)...BUT studying and (hopefully) performing well at a UK school does make it a lot easier to find a job in the UK once you get out of school.
    4. Obviously varies by person/where you go to school but I have loved lving abroad, having the opportunity to travel (it's so much cheaper once you're over there!) and just immersing my self in a different culture. Even though I had to take out student loans, I would make the same choice again in a heart beat.
    6. You won't get anything from the US gov except for loans (which no longer have nice interest rates-yaaaay.). You can sometimes get stuff from the university though, it really depends on where you're going. Another frustrating aspect is that many US scholarships (for merit or need) require that you be attending a US university. It's not great but it is doable by a) finding out if your uni has any overseas scholarship stuff b) taking out loans and c) searching (a lot) for scholarships from US organizations that let you be an overseas student.
  • cupcakecupcake Registered User Posts: 1,703 Senior Member
    You can usually work 20 hours per week in term time and full time in the holidays (so you can do internships and things) if you have a UK student visa.
  • oxicleanoxiclean Registered User Posts: 23 New Member
    I want to study International Relations too!!! :)
    check out this thread I started a couple days back: http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/united-kingdom/1532865-american-applying-british-schools.html

    might be helpful, a little long hahah
  • stressedoutttstressedouttt Registered User Posts: 4,111 Senior Member
    1. Meaning? Most people (especially internationals) apply for accommodation for their first year and get a place to stay. You can apply for accommodation for 2nd and 3rd year, but you might now get it, and a lot of people share a flat with friends for those years.
    2. Like others have said, London is an EXTREMELY expensive city. You also have to take into account that you don't usually pay the sticker price on US colleges. Unless you're Bill Gates' son (maybe a bit of an exaggeration :D but you know what I mean) or applying to NYU (known to be notorious for it's lack of FA), you will be paying much less than the tuition on the websites. The sticker price isn't what matters, it's the EFC (expected family contribution) from FAFSA that counts most. Accommodation is also ridiculously expensive.
    3. No idea
    4. Worth what? What would you be giving up? Do you mean money?
    5. If you look up the specific course (at the specific uni) that you want to study, they sometimes have a course structure that says exactly what classes you'll be taking.
    6. Scholarships, like FA, are very limited for internationals. You can try getting some money in somewhere, but don't count on it.
  • boomtingboomting Registered User Posts: 716 Member
    I am aware of the basic admissions policies of UK universities (mostly looking at APs and SATs) and I am confident that I will fit the requirements. However, even after spending very much time on research, I am still left with questions.
    1. How long would you say in an accommodation?
    Most people will stay in halls for first year, and then move out into a shared house, with friends, for their remaining years
    2. People are always saying how expensive it is. When I look at, for example, tuition, it is around $23,000. I look at Boston University as my top US school, and it is almost $40k. Of course, dorm/accommodations, books, and other necessities count into the costs of living as a college student. What is it that makes people so sure that UK is more expensive than US in terms of expenses?
    Firstly, there's naff all FA for international students - fundamentally you're there to subsidise the UK students at that university. Secondly, the cost of living can tend to be higher - and London is extortionate. Outside London, £8000 per year + flights to and from the US is an entirely comfortable figure to live on. Within London, you're looking at something closer to £11-12k + flights. However, chances are you're only going to be at university for three years rather than four, which should also be taken into account.
    3. If I am sure I want to live in England for adulthood, where do I start? By getting married to an EU citizen, most likely! This is the official website UK Border Agency | Home Page but you should be aware that there is a lot of political pressure to reduce migrant numbers, and we're not short of graduates
    4. Is it worth it? I would study international relations no matter what school I would attend and always thought that it is the perfect subject to study internationally.
    A very subjective question! However, KCL is an excellent university, and you won't be wasting your time
    5. Because UK schools usually only let students study one subject at university, I am worried about not being able to study a language(s). Would an international relations student be able to study another language, or do the school programs still restrict that?
    International status won't affect this, but it is relatively common for language modules to be available. This is KCL's programme King's College London - Assessed modules
    6. Because there is no FA, how does the scholarship system work?
    As an international student, there's not really anything available from within the UK - you / your family will have to work out a way to fund it yourselves, in full, though I believe that there are some US loans that can be taken out.
This discussion has been closed.