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The Quarter System

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Replies to: The Quarter System

  • Neo YoyoNeo Yoyo Registered User Posts: 597 Member
    "A reasonable number of classes to take in one quarter is 4.
    A reasonable number of classes to take in one semester is 6."

    Is that the average or what is generally good for graduation within 4 years?

    I've seen the statistic that only 53% graduate in 4 years. ;)
  • j0b0sapi3nj0b0sapi3n Registered User Posts: 44 Junior Member
    if you take classes every summer, can you graduate in 3.5 years or less?
  • ucapplicant05ucapplicant05 Registered User Posts: 1,415 Senior Member
    You won't have to take 4 classes every single quarter in order to graduate in four years as part of College (L&S).

    AP credits can definitely get you out early if you want. You need 180 units to graduate, where 60 of them have to be upper division. You could probably get as much as almost 100 (lower division) units through AP? 10 AP Exams ("standard" subjects) will probably average out in 60 or 70 units. That's a huge chunk of it right there. I would say that the typical major including its pre-reqs is a bit over 100 units (90-130), at least for south campus majors except engineers. Another ~40 more for GEs. So basically, you can get out in 3 to 3.5 years, in theory, without having to take extra courses during any of the quarters or during summer.

    Now of course, things can deviate because of failing classes, unable to find classes, or simply changing your mind about a major. Or some people just take random, unnecessary classes, or classes that don't fill the most requirements as possible.

    If you take classes every summer (assuming between UCLA years, 3 summers), you can graduate in 3 years since that's about 3 quarters.
  • kfc4ukfc4u Registered User Posts: 3,415 Senior Member
    if you take classes every summer, can you graduate in 3.5 years or less?

    you can graduate in 3.5 years or less WITHOUT summer if you a) know all the classes you need to take in advance instead of just randomly guessing your requirements and b) if you can get into all those classes (which you normally should)

    for example, my major (poli sci) plus the GE's comes out to be around 140 units. if i take a typical courseload of 15 units a quarter, then that means i need roughly 9 quarters (3 years) minimum to graduate. add in my AP/IB units and it'll bump up to 180 to graduate immediately.

    i have to mention though, some of the most common reasons why people do not graduate so early include changing their major, deciding to minor or double major, taking elective courses, or simply taking more courses so they can stay in college for 4 years cuz there's no better time in your life than college.
  • j0b0sapi3nj0b0sapi3n Registered User Posts: 44 Junior Member
    i'm doing engineering most likely, does that make it harder? the ap's i've taken don't really seem to help with engineering GE's except maybe compsci and upcoming calc bc, but i think i should retake intro to compsci since that was about 2 years ago

    but yeah i wana just graduate and get out hahaha although i'm sure i'll have fun in the process
  • Neo YoyoNeo Yoyo Registered User Posts: 597 Member
    I'm a bit confused...are all courses 4 units each? It sounds to me like that isn't the case.
  • flopsyflopsy Registered User Posts: 8,368 Senior Member
    Most courses are four units each.
    Some special courses are also 5, 2 or 1 unit each.
    Research courses (199s) can be 1-6 units depending on your quality of work. :rolleyes:
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Flopsy,

    at Berkeley, the finals for the fall semester are before Winter Break.

    Number of classes doesn't mean much when comparing Berkeley to UCLA because of the different systems, or unit count, but hours of class and hours of work per class do.

    :rolleyes:
  • flopsyflopsy Registered User Posts: 8,368 Senior Member
    Really? I must have confused UCB with another school on the semester system... :rolleyes:
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Harvard has fall semester finals after the break, and then a short break before spring semester. Perhaps it was them? *shrug* :rolleyes:
  • Brandnew2Brandnew2 Registered User Posts: 299 Junior Member
    I LOVE the quarter system, because I get bored with all my classes by seventh week and it's only a few more weeks until it's all over and there's a fresh start. If it were a semester system, I'd get bored halfway through. That's something to consider for people with short attention spans like me, heh. Also, handling 4 classes at a time (even at the quarter's accelerated pace) is much easier IMO than handling 6 at a time under the semester system.
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    I'm glad that you love the quarter system, but you aren't portraying Berkeley's semester system in an accurate light, much less any other symester system school that I am aware of. Here, few people (if any) take six full four unit classes. Very few people at Berkeley take more than 19 units in one semester, which is still considered a very heavy load. That would break down to about 5 4-unit classes (a 4 unit class being the most common around here) But here again we run into the problem of comparing units in two different systems. Basically, 14-17 units, or about 3-5 classes, is fairly standard, although this is no solid rule- some people take many one-unit classes and some take three five unit classes, for instance. Few take six classes unless the classes have much smaller unit counts, or there's a lab attactched to a class, or something like that.
  • Brandnew2Brandnew2 Registered User Posts: 299 Junior Member
    Yea, I know. I was just making the point that 4 classes 3x a year = 12 diff courses, which is a very doable courseload. If you wanted to take 12 different courses a year under the semester system, you'd need to take 6 a semester, which as you've pointed out isn't really practical. This helps people like me, who get bored after staying in any particular course for too long.
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Well, that's fine, but it was somewhat inaccurate.

    Post edit- I have a friend in 8 classes, and at the peak it was 19 units (not all classes lasted the whole semester). There are many non-four unit classes. The seminars tend to be 1 unit, for instance. There are some two and many three unit classes as well. It is possible to take a broad array of courses all at once, or more intense courses with fewer overall units, but I do bet that this might be easier on the quarter system.
  • Brandnew2Brandnew2 Registered User Posts: 299 Junior Member
    Sorry for the confusion.
This discussion has been closed.