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UCLA admission rates for Freshman, Transfer, In-State, Out-of-State and International applicants

TownBizz510TownBizz510 21 replies4 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
Freshman

UCLA: 12.4%
UC Berkeley: 16.8%
UC Irvine: 26.6%
UC Santa Barbara: 29.7%
UC San Diego: 32.3%
UC Davis: 39.1%
UC Santa Cruz: 51.8%
UC Riverside: 56.7%
UC Merced: 75.4%
Transfers:
UCLA: 21.59%
UC Berkeley: 25.53%
UC Irvine: 43.97%
UC Santa Barbara: 51.27%
UC Merced: 56.9%
UC San Diego: 56.15%
UC Davis: 57.53%
UC Santa Cruz: 60.88%
UC Riverside: 70.5%
Admission Rates for California Applicants:
UCLA: 11.8%
UC Berkeley: 19.2%
UC Irvine: 21.3%
UC Santa Barbara: 26.9%
UC San Diego: 27.6%
UC Davis: 35.5%
UC Santa Cruz: 42.5%
UC Riverside: 55.8%
UC Merced: 77%
Admission Rates for Out-of-State Applicants (Domestic):
UCLA: 16.5%
UC Berkeley: 17.1%
UC Santa Barbara: 38.7%
UC Irvine: 44.2%
UC San Diego: 59.6%
UC Davis: 62.8%
UC Merced: 72.4%
UC Riverside: 73.9%
UC Santa Cruz: 85.5%
Admission Rates for International Applicants:
UCLA: 8.49%
UC Berkeley: 9.16%
UC San Diego: 29.7%
UC Santa Barbara: 34.6%
UC Irvine: 40.5%
UC Davis: 42.1%
UC Merced: 50.3%
UC Riverside: 69.5%
UC Santa Cruz: 74.5%

Sources:

https://www.ucop.edu/institutional-research-academic-planning/_files/factsheets/2019/fall-2019-applications-table-1-1.pdf

https://www.ucop.edu/institutional-research-academic-planning/_files/factsheets/2019/fall-2019-admission-table-1-1.pdf

https://www.ucop.edu/institutional-research-academic-planning/_files/factsheets/2019/fall-2019-applications-table-1-2.pdf

https://www.ucop.edu/institutional-research-academic-planning/_files/factsheets/2019/fall-2019-admission-table-1-2.pdf
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Replies to: UCLA admission rates for Freshman, Transfer, In-State, Out-of-State and International applicants

  • firmament2xfirmament2x 253 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @TownBizz510 . . . thank you for your work, well done. A few qualitative (not nec. wrt some sort of high standard, but more re some non-quantitative) points if I may...

    -Some feel that UCLA and the rest of the UCs are being oppressive towards CA residents b/c the admit rate is lower for Californians as compared to domestic non-residents (out-of-state students or "oos"). This isn't true, firstly, b/c the threshold of qualification is higher for these latter students, with a 3.4 v. a 3.1 gpa min. needed to apply. In either case, these aren't particularly high standards, but there are doubtlessly a decent no. of CA residents who will apply who have grades between these two markers (I'm assuming a-g, but not sure in regard to UC gpa, which would be really low).

    -Additionally wrt above, the 1st generation cohort of UCLA is mainly admitted from CA. So UCLA searches far and wide within the state to find those who can do the work at the University within this cohort, but who might not manifest the stats because of, say, personal statement disclosure of hardship, e.g., having to work numerous hours to add to familial income, etc. UCLA promotes practically anyone to apply from CA, especially, which thereby enables more lesser qualified students to seek admittance.

    - The number of admits for frosh entering UCLA in years 2017, 2018, and 2019 shows a large dip for the incoming class: 16.5, 16.0, and 13.7k. I believe this manifests that UCLA is utilizing wait-lists much more effectively. They might be w-l'ing those with really high stats to see if they're interested in being considered within it, to test if they're really interested in attending UCLA. The stats of oos students seems to ascending really highly, which shows that UCLA is in high demand for top-tier students across the country.

    -Internationals have the hardest time being admitted, because, one, they may not realize how hard UCLA is to which to gain admission -- some undoubtedly might think that UCLA is party-central, but also two, their grade conversion might be too difficult. There's also the language efficiency (or deficiency) aspect; thus many attend community college in CA and the states, which then reflects in an extremely high proportion of International cc xfers to UCLA (and UC).

    - The lowering of acceptance rate at UCLA for xfers reflects in a higher median/mean gpa for this cohort. The median or perhaps mean is approaching a 3.8 average. In 2018 it was ~ 3.77. Lower acceptance rates for those entering from high school will undoubtedly drive a lower acceptance rate from the xfer set. It'll be interesting to see what happens when Tidal Wave II of college students ends.

    - I thought that UCLA's yield from the transfer set would be increasing significantly. From UCLA's admissions site, though, it doesn't reflect this. It's pretty steady at around 60%. At one time Berk's would have been higher, but UCLA's should be consistently higher now. I think what's helping UCLA is having really good minors, so someone might take an offer to be accepted to the University as a Soc major, but this student could possibly add a Program in Computing, Film, Entrepreneurship, Accounting, premed, Sustainability, Digital Humanities, or whatever minor -- if they have the available credits.

    - The University does need to help the xfer set by integrating them better by helping them get their classes much more easily because they're going to be taking a heavier upper-div set of classes in their time at UCLA, in addition to helping them to gain important internships with companies and firms so they can major in something other than business, say, and still be a viable candidate within it.


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  • lkg4answerslkg4answers 1591 replies189 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 19
    Admissions data for OOS can be misleading because the yield is lower. Do you have enrollment data?
    edited August 19
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  • firmament2xfirmament2x 253 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @lkg4answers . . . don't mean to speak for TownBiz510, but yields won't be calculable until late in the year, to see who enrolled and who didn't. From the class entering in 2018, they were 50%/24%/29% for CA/oos/Int'ls, so the yields presumably should go up for those entering in the fall because of the decrease in total acceptances > 2,000. I would guess that all three cohorts should go up materially b/c, again, I'm thinking that UCLA has utilized wait-lists more effectively. It'll be interesting to see.
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  • firmament2xfirmament2x 253 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Actually, here are the changes in total acceptances for students of each cohort.

    Acceptances..........................2018................2019.............Decrease...........% Change
    California Students...........8,730.............8,352.................378....................... -04.3%
    OOS Students......................5,043.............3,808...............1,235....................... -24.5%
    International Students...2,247..............1,587..................660....................... -29.4%

    So there isn't a material change in total acceptances for CA students, only down 4.3%, but the 25% and 29% reduction in OOS and Internationals is incredibly high. I still think that UCLA believes it has utilized wait-lists more effectively to get better yields, but the other notion would be that it is reducing non-resident enrollment by significant amounts, or perhaps the University's felt that it overenrolled, say, the previous year. I don't think this is the case for non-residents because the year in which each UC set a cap of enrollment of its non-residents would seemingly be around 20 and 10% for OOS and Internationals, respectively for UCLA; in addition, there hasn't been a notice going forth that UCLA would want to lower its frosh class under ~ 6,000 students, unless this is the beginning of the end of Tidal Wave II.

    Additionally, if I used the 50%/24%/29% yields for each of the cohorts from 2018 it would amount to a frosh class of the following:

    California..............................4,176
    OOS.............................................914
    International........................460
    Total Enrollment Est....5,550 (based on prior year's sub-yields)

    I suppose this is possible, but there was never a notice that the enrollments would decrease. We'll just have to see what scenario occurs: much better yield from non-residents and slightly for CA students, or a decline in total enrollment perhaps as a correction of, say, the prior year.
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  • firmament2xfirmament2x 253 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Sorry for my ignorance. I guess I should have perused the board and read some of the other links people have provided. This one is a good link on the University's plans for 2019 enrollment. Thanks to @KTJordan78 .

    Here's a quote from the article:
    Of all students accepted for freshman admission, UCLA expects to enroll approximately 4,440 California residents, 240 more than last year, and 1,460 students from outside California, or 140 fewer students compared with last year.

    So we have:
    Residental Status..........No. Accepted.........Est..Enrolled..........Yield %.......Cohort%ofClass
    CA Resident..........................8,352...........................4,400.......................52.7%.................75.1%
    Non-Residents....................5,395............................1,460........................27.1%..................24.9%
    Total..........................................13,747............................5,860.......................42.6%...............100.0%

    The numbers don't match the administration's estimates, because the above quote would mean that 2018's enrollment would have been about 5,960. It was more like 6,240 per the UCLA Admissions website. Sloppy reporting...

    The lowering of acceptance rate from 14.1% to 12.4% occurred from 2018 to 2019, with:
    Total Applications...................... - 2,429
    Acceptances................................. - 2,273,
    with a purposeful reduction in non-residents from 30% to 25%, with Californians increasing from 70% to 75%, all this based on University estimates. Being that it will receive a higher yield from the California cohort, the decrease in acceptance rate will seemingly be mainly because of the step-up in the native student cohort. I don't think it's really reflective of a "higher" perception of the University, even though we -- at least on this board -- know the University is great.

    Indeed because the scores of CA students tend to be lower than non-residents -- again, because of the increase of 1st-gens as inferred from above -- the lower acceptance rate could mean a lowering of scores if not grades from the 2018 total cohort of admits.

    Bottom line, we'll just have to see when the enrollment numbers come forth.

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