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Does CU offer instate tuition to OOS w hi GPA

woobisswoobiss Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
edited January 2013 in University of Colorado
My senior has been accepted everywhere he applied (so far) and has many offers ranging from full ride to in state tuition (all schools are in the southeast). My sophomore has indicated he would like to go to CU (ski bum) but this will only happen if he can get in-state tuition. His GPA as a sophomore is 3.95, and expected to rise next year when he takes more 5 point classes.

Does CU offer in-state tuition to OOS students that meet a certain academic criteria (as many southeastern states seem to do)??
Post edited by woobiss on

Replies to: Does CU offer instate tuition to OOS w hi GPA

  • Rousse54Rousse54 Registered User Posts: 520 Member
    No, CU does not offer those same kind of offers. My son attends there OOS. They do have Chancellor's and Presidential Scholarships for out of state students. But it is not for much money. The Presidential Scholarship is for the top 1-2 percent of accepted OOS students, and the Chancellor's is for the top 25 percent. My son had a 4.0 UW GPA, 4.22 WGPA, ACT of 31 and all he received was the Chancellor's scholarship, which for his year was $15000 over four years. There are also scholarships you can apply for like Norlin Scholars, scholarships in the department he will be applying to, and you can get each one of them possibly, but even if you received all of the scholarships together it would probably not bring it down to the level of instate tuition.
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