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UNC-Chapel Hill Housing Question (time sensitive)

Hello! I am going to be an out-of-state transfer to UNC. On my college tour, the tour guide mentioned that three dorms on campus will provide in-state tuition to out-of-state students after their first year but I forgot to write them down. If anyone knows which dorms they are I'd be very grateful as I'd like to apply for housing for one of those dorms. Thanks!

Replies to: UNC-Chapel Hill Housing Question (time sensitive)

  • jdogNCjdogNC Registered User Posts: 60 Junior Member
    edited May 10
    Doesn't sound correct at all. Establishing NC residency for instate tuition is very difficult, if not impossible, just by moving to NC as a student. I would count on paying OOS tuition for you tenor at UNC. Check out all the requirements at this link.

    https://registrar.unc.edu/academic-services/residency/residency-guide/

    If your parents are still paying your way and they are out of state, then you are probably stuck. Would advise you only have a shot if you get a NC drivers license, vote in the state, have car registered in the state, don't rely on funds from someone that lives in another state, have a job in NC and pay taxes and have your permanent residence in NC and those are an absolute minimum. The old trick of getting instate residence by going to school doesn't work any more. I doubt a dorm is a permanent address instate since you only have 9 month leases, even at Granville Towers.
  • Mcunn226Mcunn226 Registered User Posts: 255 Junior Member
    Under North Carolina law, to qualify for in-state residency, you must show that you:

    Have established your legal residence (domicile) in North Carolina, and
    Have maintained that domicile for at least twelve (12) consecutive months before the beginning of the term, and
    Have a residentiary presence in the state, and
    Intend to make North Carolina your permanent home indefinitely (rather than being in North Carolina solely to attend college)
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