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Conflicting Info: Out of State applicants

hokiemama24hokiemama24 56 replies8 threads Junior Member
Pitt was an early contender on D21's college list because Neuroscience is one of her top 3 majors of interest, but over time I had her take it off because I thought I'd read on here that Pitt just does not tend to give much aid (by way of merit) to OOS applicants (I know fin aid is limited to in state as its a public institution, etc).

However, more recently I feel like I've seen the opposite where Pitt is being recommended as generous with merit. The website really is somewhat vague in this regard ($2-$25K) so its hard to get a sense of what a typical "honors college" student is awarded. Now that its time for D21 to finalize her app list, I just wanted to ask more directly. Thank you!
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Replies to: Conflicting Info: Out of State applicants

  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 10408 replies123 threads Senior Member
    When my D applied to colleges a few years back, Pitt was a popular choice for OH students chasing merit. The class before my D's saw a number of NMFs get full tuition scholarships but, her year (HS class of '18) there was shift. She had three NMF/4.0 UW GPA friends who all got small awards at Pitt but full rides elsewhere. It seems like they are continuing that trend for fewer and fewer large awards. They are still to be had but much more competitive.

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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 5506 replies93 threads Senior Member
    edited June 15
    Pitt announced last year, maybe 2018, that they would be shifting merit $ to need-based aid $.

    I would go thru this year's Pitt thread, it looked like merit was mostly $5K-$10K and $15K was uncommon.....seems like merit started at around an ACT of 33. I don't know if their merit goes above those numbers unless the student receives a Chancellor's or Stamps scholarship.

    In their 2019/20 common data set, looks like 362 frosh received non-need based aid and were award an average of $11K (H2A n and o).

    https://ir.pitt.edu/facts-publications/common-data-set/

    edited June 15
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  • happygliahappyglia 5 replies0 threads New Member
    edited June 20
    I do not believe there was a shift away from merit aid. There has been more money put into need-based aid however. Merit aid still exists, although it may be more competitive to get because incoming student credentials has steadily risen.

    Traditionally, Pitt had considered in-state tuition already discounted (because it is for all intents and purposes) and at least in the past there seemed to be more aid given to OOS because of those calculations. So I would say that it is not a good idea to discount possible merit or need-based aid based only on one's residency.

    You certainly will not find a better undergrad neuroscience program in the country than Pitt. There are equivalent ones, but not really better, and certainly not more mature and robust with as many research opportunities, and the latter is probably the most important thing to look at, because the bottom line is, neuroscience is a research field. It always makes sense to see what you are actually offered, aid-wise, from any particular institution in these situations before eliminating them because there are so many factors that go into offers and those factors are seemingly tweaked from year-to-year.

    edited June 20
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  • NJdad07090NJdad07090 618 replies8 threads Member
    Based on this years class from my area of NJ, Pitt was not as generous as some other OOS state schools, better than Penn State and UMinn, not as good as tOSU or South Carolina , but really no downside to applying to Pitt , they opened admissions very early this past year, like Aug.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 5506 replies93 threads Senior Member
    edited June 20
    happyglia wrote: »
    I do not believe there was a shift away from merit aid. There has been more money put into need-based aid however. Merit aid still exists, although it may be more competitive to get because incoming student credentials has steadily risen.

    I didn't say merit aid would go to nothing, but it has decreased. Here are several resources discussing the shift from merit aid to need-based aid at U Pitt:

    https://www.provost.pitt.edu/access-and-affordability

    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/10/18/new-grant-program-pitt-matches-pell-grants-and-targets-students-unmet-need


    An earlier CC thread on it:
    https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-pittsburgh/2160486-pitt-officially-is-moving-away-from-pure-merit-p1.html
    edited June 20
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  • carachel2carachel2 3049 replies25 threads Senior Member
    "Generous with merit." What specifically do you mean?
    Do they give a lot of $$ to all students? no
    Do they give a decent amount of $$ to students with high stats? YES. It's usually enough to make it equal to their in-state options or maybe even a lower.

    But Pitt WILL stick to their merit threshold. So if your student has stats below their merit threshold (typically a 33 and up or 1480 SAT and up) then yes, take it off the list if you can't afford full pay out of state tuition.
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  • happygliahappyglia 5 replies0 threads New Member
    edited June 23
    Mwfan1921 wrote: »

    I didn't say merit aid would go to nothing, but it has decreased. Here are several resources discussing the shift from merit aid to need-based aid at U Pitt:

    https://www.provost.pitt.edu/access-and-affordability

    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/10/18/new-grant-program-pitt-matches-pell-grants-and-targets-students-unmet-need


    An earlier CC thread on it:

    No, merit aid at Pitt has not decreased. You've linked to stories about programs that are targeting increases in need-based aid, but they say nothing about concurrent decreases in merit aid. And the prior CC thread was also wrong because it was likewise based on false assumptions.

    According to Pitt's Common Data Sets, total institutional provided non-need based aid and tuition waivers (e.g. merit aid) increased 3.2% from Fall 2018 to Fall 2019 and by 18% over the last five years.

    In addition, over that five year period, the number of students who had no financial need that were awarded institutionally-provided merit scholarships or grants rose from 450 to 713 (a 58% increase).

    There has been a new emphasis at Pitt to provide additional need-based aid. There has NOT been a corollary decrease in merit-based aid. There has been increased competition for the pool of merit aid.
    edited June 23
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  • happygliahappyglia 5 replies0 threads New Member
    edited June 23
    Mwfan1921 wrote: »

    I didn't say merit aid would go to nothing, but it has decreased. Here are several resources discussing the shift from merit aid to need-based aid at U Pitt:

    https://www.provost.pitt.edu/access-and-affordability

    https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/10/18/new-grant-program-pitt-matches-pell-grants-and-targets-students-unmet-need


    An earlier CC thread on it:

    No, Pitt has not decreased merit aid. What you've linked are articles describing new programs that emphasize increases in need-based aid. They nowhere mention any concurrent decreases in merit awards, and the linked prior CC thread was wrong because it likewise was based on the same false assumption.

    According to Pitt's common data sets, from Fall 2018 to Fall 2019, there was a 3.2% increase in the total dollar amount of institutionally-provided non-need based aid and tuition waivers (e.g. merit awards). Over the past five year period, there was an 18.2% increase in non-need based merit awards.

    Over the same five year period, the number of students that had no financial need and received merit awards increased from 450 to 713 (a 58% increase).

    Pitt has initiated multiple new programs to help increase need-based aid, but that has not resulted in corollary decrease in merit awards. However, competition for the pool of merit awards has increased.
    edited June 23
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  • LincheLinche 1 replies0 threads New Member
    We are from NY and my son will be attending Pitt's Honor's College class of 2024. His stats were high and he rec'd a scholarship from both Pitt and a NY Pitt Alumni Group. He chose Pitt over other very competitive schools in large part because of the merit scholarships.
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