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are USC students really liberal?

ilovecapeziosilovecapezios Registered User Posts: 144 Junior Member
I've read that USC students are more moderate than most selective schools. Is this true?? For people who go to USC or just know it really well, is USC liberal, moderate, or conservative?
Post edited by ilovecapezios on

Replies to: are USC students really liberal?

  • diehldundiehldun Registered User Posts: 1,499 Senior Member
    Yes, I would say moderate. Though liberals are definitely prominent throughout campus, there are certainly a bunch of conservatives (most of my friends are, actually, including myself). Historically, USC was much more Republican/Conservative, and today, still a considerably large conservative base for any major (private) school today.
  • QuixoticRickQuixoticRick Registered User Posts: 1,289 Senior Member
    I've heard that the Republicans or conservatives still have a pretty strong "hold" on USC, especially compared to the UCs, which are predominantly (even overwhelmingly liberal). However, I believe the liberals are most vocal and out there.
  • cc411cc411 Registered User Posts: 1,724 Senior Member
    Pretty much agree with QuixoticRick...

    but my s's also both found strong contingencies of libertarians. Ron Paul had a big turn out at his visit a couple months ago.
  • MrTrojanManMrTrojanMan Registered User Posts: 687 Member
    you know, i would like to think that the administartion is conscientiously making the effort to accept a student body that is widely diverse in regards to political values. and i think they are doing a very a good job. ive met some of the most vocal liberals to the most annoying of conservatives, and i would like to think that has made me smarter or at least a more open-minded and better person.

    i think it doesnt matter who you are, you will find people that share the same values as you and people who totally (and often justifiably) contradict you, here at USC.

    dont be like: "oh im liberal, therefore i want to go to a liberal school with liberal values and not associate with any other type of people because i like that way." you dont really learn anything valuable that way.
  • QuixoticRickQuixoticRick Registered User Posts: 1,289 Senior Member
    I loved the little anecdote about the "USC mafia" on the Wikipedia page though.
    For much of the late 20th century, USC has had a reputation for being a politically conservative campus.[46] In the politically charged times of the 1960s-70s, and in stark contrast to the University of California campuses, USC was one of the few campuses in California where then-Governor Ronald Reagan could visit without additional protection.[47] This image may have been reinforced by the fact that in the early seventies, several conservative Republican alumni, known collectively as the "USC mafia", served on then President Richard Nixon's staff as well as during Nixon's reelection campaign, which was later tainted by the notorious Watergate scandal.[46] USC's student body has historically consisted of a Republican majority, as suggested by the fact that the major conservative student group on campus, the USC Republicans, had traditionally outnumbered and outvoiced the school's Democratic counterpart for much of its history. Furthermore, student politics at USC--often between conservative factions--has been notoriously corrupt;[48] the corruption and problems were notable enough that they appeared in the screenplay for All the President's Men.[f]

    In recent times, this conservative majority has begun to give way to an increasingly powerful liberal voice, which has been attributed to the growing diversity, both regional and ethnic, of the student body;[46] student membership in the USC Democrats has surpassed that of the USC Republicans in recent years.[46]

    University of Southern California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • proudtrojanproudtrojan . Posts: 174 Junior Member
    As in every respect, USC is very diverse, and every kind of person is represented. That said, from my experience, I have found that it is not an extremely political campus. There are people who take politics very seriously, but the campus does lack alot of the activism that is characteristic of other schools. I like to think that the relative state of tranquility concides more with the fact that we prioritize our ties as a single Trojan family, and everyone is entitled to his/her own political views.
  • IamrecognizedIamrecognized Registered User Posts: 142 Junior Member
    It would make sense for USC to be less liberal than other places such as the UC's.

    First of all, college students are known to be liberal in general, that's just the way it is. And rich families are more likely (historically) to be conservative (economically at least). USC, as we all know, has a reputation for being for the rich kids. So that would explain why it was conservative. Now, while the rich kid reputation seems to stick (rather annoyingly) that is really not the case. And therefore it makes sense that it is less conservative than it was.
  • acarey617acarey617 Registered User Posts: 506 Member
    Like most college campuses these days, especially ones on the West Coast, it's left-leaning. But on boards like this, it's seen as "moderate" or even "slightly conservative" by the posters' standards.

    Hell, even Vanderbilt is probably evenly split between liberals and conservatives, yet it is labeled as "very conservative" or "very southern."
  • diehldundiehldun Registered User Posts: 1,499 Senior Member
    I think it definitely has to be taken into context with other schools (*cough UCs*)
  • sfgiantssfgiants Registered User Posts: 1,489 Senior Member
    Coming from a San Francisco Public High School, I was initially taken aback at the number of right-leaning people on campus. There are also a lot more religious people than I was used to. I'm adjusted now, and I appreciate getting the chance to listen to points of view that I would not be exposed to in SF. I would rather go to a college with individuals with different views than my own, to be entirely honest, so I view this as a positive thing.
This discussion has been closed.