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University of Toronto

arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
I am currently a junior in high school in the US. I read that you need to have AP Calculus in order to even major in Engineering? that seems kind of odd. Can anyone confirm this?
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Replies to: University of Toronto

  • jamesjunkersjamesjunkers Registered User Posts: 1,706 Senior Member
    I don't know anything about the University of Toronto, but I will elaborate in a general sense.

    For most engineering schools, it is highly recommended that you take the highest level of mathematics and physics offered at your high school. While not required, it is very common for applicants at top engineering schools to have taken AP Calculus BC and AP Physics B (1/2) or C.
  • PlebeianDreamerPlebeianDreamer Registered User Posts: 70 Junior Member
    I am not certain as to how the school system in the US works, but I know that U of T Engineering requires that you take a grade 12 "Calculus and Vectors" course. From my experiences, this is essentially a dumbed-down version of AP Calculus AB/BC (it touches on derivatives, vectors, and a bit of integration).

    Again, I do not know much about U of T engineering's requirements for internationals. If your school does not offer any other calculus course, then you should probably take AP Calc. Your best bet would be to call up U of T.
  • DarkEclipseDarkEclipse Registered User Posts: 712 Member
    Yeah, you need AP Calculus if you want to major in Engineering at U of Toronto. It isn't odd, except within the US, most students studying in a US patterned curriculum have to take a few AP subjects if they want to study outside the US.
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    Thanks for the replies. My school does offer calculus and I have already taken but I did poorly on the AP exam. Do they need the AP score or just the evidence of taking the class? I got a B in calculus
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    I actually have another question. I am quite unfamiliar with the application process for University of Toronto. I know that there are 3 campuses (st George, Mississauga, and Scarborough), are these considered separate schools where I would have to send in separate applications like the University of California system with Berkeley, Los Angeles, Davis, etc.?
  • DarkEclipseDarkEclipse Registered User Posts: 712 Member
    No, they're not different schools, they're just different campuses, with different faculties present. For example, only the St. George campus has Engineering.
  • PlebeianDreamerPlebeianDreamer Registered User Posts: 70 Junior Member
    In Canada, you would apply to the programs (majors essentially) of the different schools in the system, much like how UC's application system works.
  • ItsJustSchoolItsJustSchool Registered User Posts: 1,974 Senior Member
    It is wicked expensive to put in an application (about 4x a typical US application fee). The application is pretty straightforward though, and is good for all Ontario schools (you tick off University of Toronto). If you choose Engineering, it is at the St. George Campus. There is a college (residential + seminars) system for Letters Arts and Sciences, but not for Engineering.
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    Ok thanks. Also is engineering the hardest to get into? How hard
  • ItsJustSchoolItsJustSchool Registered User Posts: 1,974 Senior Member
    I don't know what is "The Hardest." My impression is that they have a relatively low bar for acceptance, but they weed heavily in the coursework. I suspect it is easier to get in than it is to stay in. Also, there are byzantine systems of bursaries (merit- and need-based financial aid) with impenetrable requirements. Apply early so that you may be eligible for something (I could never figure out even how many one qualifies for).
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    I have an 87-89% average GPA based on the standards they use in Canada. I got a 2100 on my SAT. What are my chances of admission?
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,600 Senior Member
    Pretty low, UT engineering often admits at 91-93% Canadian. And yes you're expected to have AP Calculus, preferably BC because most admitted students will have had the equivalent of that, or higher, even though Calc AB would be acceptable if you come from a low-performing school. Your AP scores in Calc, Physics, and one more science will also weight heavily.
    You may want to check other colleges, including outside Ontario (Québec = check out Dawson College to brush up on your calculus/physics for a year "DEC" and then apply for a 3-year degree in Engineering?)
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    Thanks for the answer. Do you know how selective UofT is for Computer science? What are my chances there?
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,600 Senior Member
    edited March 2015
    Quite selective too - you can check but I think 88-90 Canadian. It's one of the top three-4 universities in Canada so....However your odds are better than fir engineering.
  • arkm110arkm110 Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    Thanks. Do you know which campus in UofT is better for computer science? And if they have any differences in terms of selectivity?
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