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Asians acceptance rate at Vandy

collegestressed1collegestressed1 Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
edited January 2014 in Vanderbilt University
Do asians have a higher chance of getting into Vanderbilt because they make up 9.2% of student population at Vanderbilt? Or is it harder because the college wants a limited number of minorities at Vanderbilt therefore they only accept a certain number of asians or of any ethnicity other than caucasian?
Post edited by collegestressed1 on
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Replies to: Asians acceptance rate at Vandy

  • PancakedPancaked Registered User Posts: 3,355 Senior Member
    Vanderbilt certainly doesn't want a limited number of minorities... That's a pretty bold statement....

    Asians have the same chance as any other race that isn't under-represented.
  • austinareadadaustinareadad Registered User Posts: 671 Member
    If you check the Common Data Set for the previous years, it appears that the percentage of Asian students is rising year by year.
  • rmldadrmldad Registered User Posts: 1,301 Senior Member
    I'm confused by the statement, "any other race that isn't under-represented". Does this include any other than White?
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    Asians have the same chance as any other race that isn't under-represented

    Since Asians comprise:
    -- 1.5% of the Tennessee population
    -- 5% of the overall U.S. population
    -- 9.2% of the Vanderbilt student population,
    then they are OVER-represented at Vanderbilt.

    Since Whites comprise:
    -- 79.5% of the Tennessee population
    -- 78.1% of the overall U.S. population
    -- 70.3% of the Vanderbilt student population,
    then they are UNDER-represented at Vanderbilt.


    source of data:
    The Vanderbilt Profile*|*Undergraduate Admissions*|*Vanderbilt University
    Tennessee QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau
  • SoCalDad2SoCalDad2 Registered User Posts: 868 Member
    Post #6:
    It's an open secret that the top universities try to keep their undergraduate Asian enrollment at 20% or less for the sake of "diversity,"

    Do you have any evidence of this?
  • PancakedPancaked Registered User Posts: 3,355 Senior Member
    "Under represented" only gives an advantage to minorities in college admissions (hence URM, not just UR).
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    @SoCalDad2, yes there is evidence of this
    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/12/19/fears-of-an-asian-quota-in-the-ivy-league/statistics-indicate-an-ivy-league-asian-quota

    Look at the graph in the article.
    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2012/12/13/opinion/AsianRFD/AsianRFD-custom1.jpg

    As per U.S. Census data, the percentage of Asians in the U.S. has risen form 2.8% in 1990, to 5.0%. Since 1990, the percentage of 18-20 y.o. Asian kids in the U.S. has doubled. And at Caltech (which does has race-blind admissions) the percentage of Asian kids has risen commensurately.

    But at the Ivy League schools, the percentage of Asian kids has stayed mysteriously flat, or has even declined (as in the cases of Yale & Cornell), and has converged to 20% for all the Ivy League schools.
  • SoCalDad2SoCalDad2 Registered User Posts: 868 Member
    Lots of things could be going on here -- I would be very careful before I accused schools of suppressing Asian enrollment.

    For example, Asians still are very over-represented. Why is that? Because they have comparatively higher GPA's and SAT's than other ethnic groups? If so, Asians would become less over-represented over time if colleges moved away from GPA's and SAT's, and considered more "holistic" factors at which Asians would not have such a comparative advantage. And, in fact, the recent explosion in applications to "top" colleges probably has forced colleges to place more weight on factors other than GPA's and SAT's just as a way to sufficiently narrow the applicant pool.

    Also, what has happened to Asian applications over this time? Have they increased as much as applications from other ethnic groups? Or were Asians into the "prestige" schools long before everyone else was? If so, Asians could now be facing more competition for the spots at the top schools.
  • PancakedPancaked Registered User Posts: 3,355 Senior Member
    Elijah, that is the reason Asians are overrepresented. Asians on average tend to have higher GPAs and SATs, it's a fact. Just as Hispanics tend to have lower GPAs and SATs. No one is saying they are "grade grubbers" and aren't holistic Asians just have an advantage in those two measures and it has made them overrepresented in top colleges.

    The extracurriculars are probably more equal across the board-- I don't think there's any evidence to the contrary. SoCal isn't saying the Asian applicant pool is disadvantaged in this category, he's saying they don't have a particular advantage. If schools reduced emphasis on SAT and GPA, you would naturally start to see the Asian advantage going away and a more even distribution as predicted by the rest of the application outside of SAT/GPA.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    There was a Duke paper about the academic performance at Duke of different racial groups. While the uproar over the paper was about black Duke students, quietly buried in the paper is: that not only did the asian Duke students have higher academic stats coming in, but they also had higher scored (as rated by the Duke admissions officers) EC's, recs & essays. All the bars were set higher for the asian kids applying to Duke, not just the SAT bar:
    http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2012/01/not-catching-up-affirmative-action-at-duke-university.html

    Since duke is in vandy's peer group, I would expect similar profiles for the asian students at vandy.
  • PancakedPancaked Registered User Posts: 3,355 Senior Member
    Oh, well, that would suggest we're both wrong. Interesting. Still I would expect Asians to have a larger (and more quantitative, obviously) advantage in SAT/ACT than other areas of applications.
  • SoCalDad2SoCalDad2 Registered User Posts: 868 Member
    Here is an example that expands on my post #10 above: Asians make up x% of college age students. Assume that if colleges accepted entirely on the basis of grades and test scores, Asians would make up 5x of students at top colleges. If colleges accepted entirely on the basis of factors other than grades and test scores, Asians would make up 2x of students at top colleges. Thus, Asians are outperforming other students on all measures, but are comparatively better at grades and test scores than on other measures.

    If colleges shift their focus from grades and test scores to other factors, the percentage of Asian students will decline. Such a change in focus probably has occurred over the past 20 years: colleges have moved more to holistic factors to achieve diversity, and more to holistic factors as an additional way to narrow done the ever expanding applicant pool. Thus, the representation of Asians in colleges could stay about the same even though the percentage of students who are Asians increases. And it is not because of any policy to limit Asians.
  • opie12opie12 Registered User Posts: 47 Junior Member
    "Since Duke is in Vandy's peer group I would expect similar profiles for Asain students at Vandy"
    Duke is far more popular with US and international Asian students than Vanderbilt. Duke has already hit their Asian ceiling making it very difficult for Asian students to get in. Vanderbilt is still looking to attract and grow it's Asian student body so it probably is easier for an Asian student to be accepted into Vandy.
    The referenced article was about the failure of affirmative action for black students at Duke. I'm sure one could find articles supporting it as well.
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