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No credit for calculus AP score of 5

HogeDotyHogeDoty 28 replies6 postsRegistered User Junior Member
Could someone explain why an AP score of 5 in calculus does not exempt a student from having to take calculus as a business major pre req?
My son was told that as an incoming freshman he still needs to take calculus but at a higher level given his AP score.
This is absurd!
Hardworking intelligent students having to waste precious learning opportunities.

Why is calculus even a pre req for this major? It’s useless for business. I have a business degree and career in business and there is NO application of calculus to my work.
Statistics, yes; calculus, no.
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Replies to: No credit for calculus AP score of 5

  • sushirittosushiritto 3693 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Calc AB or BC? Calculus is requirement for many undergraduate business programs.
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  • HogeDotyHogeDoty 28 replies6 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited July 29
    Wake doesn't really care about a well rounded education.
    edited July 29
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  • HogeDotyHogeDoty 28 replies6 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    It’s completely unfair to not honor a student’s hard won credit. It’s a way for private universities to make sure certain departments have enrollment. For $70,000 per year this is unacceptable.
    My son could be expanding his mind with art or music or history or music instead of another useless calculus course.
    What it shows is Wake is less devoted to a well rounded education than it says it is.
    It is irrelevant what other private universities do.
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  • CTScoutmomCTScoutmom 1940 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    This is something you check when looking at schools. If it were a deal breaker, he should have chosen another school. There are plenty of college who don't award AP credit, let alone allow its use toward requirement toward a major. Their school, their rules. Perhaps they want to ensure Calculus is taught their way?
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  • sushirittosushiritto 3693 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    So, at my kid's university, they had to take a math placement test prior to class registration, among other subject areas. Was one administered at your student's school?

    Also, I agree with brantly, college level Calc, depending on school, can be much more difficult than AP Calc.
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  • skieuropeskieurope 38522 replies6742 postsSuper Moderator Super Moderator
    It’s completely unfair to not honor a student’s hard won credit.
    As I have said before on this site: To quote Faye Dunaway in Mommie Dearest: "Ah, but nobody ever said life was fair, Tina."

    Regardless, it is what it is. And he does not lose credit, it just counts as a general elective. And none of this should have been a big surprise; no college keeps its academic policies a secret to prospective students.
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  • HogeDotyHogeDoty 28 replies6 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    I don’t blindly accept what a school sets as its rules. If it’s a systemic issue in higher education then parents should try and change it, not follow unproven educational requirements.

    It’s amazing that most parents don’t advocate for a well rounded education for their children and instead meekly go along with whatever the academic powers require or recommend.

    If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.
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  • sushirittosushiritto 3693 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 29
    It's A class. One class. And if your student got a 5 on the AP test, then it shouldn't be too difficult of A class. Putting a positive spin on it, your child could get an easy A in it. :smile:
    edited July 29
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  • Groundwork2022Groundwork2022 1958 replies26 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    State colleges are much more likely to give credit for AP classes. Private schools can set whatever requirements they want. I understand your frustration, but in fairness, that should have been a consideration when deciding where to apply. One calc class shouldn't be too burdensome relative to the many colleges that require students to start with an entire year of core classes.
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 6696 replies44 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Not sure what makes taking a math course equate to being "not well rounded". It's one course. There are plenty of opportunities to take courses outside of one's major in college.

    Sounds to me that this student didn't do their homework ahead of time to see what AP credits would be allowed, and what the 4 year curriculum looked like. If this was so important, there are plenty of schools that do accept AP credits, and that information is readily available.

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  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN 3329 replies11 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Wouldn’t the calc 2 class help the student achieve the parent’s goal of well roundedness? Agreed that it’s odd that the parent has such as sudden interest in something that could have been known much earlier.
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  • HogeDotyHogeDoty 28 replies6 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    It’s odd?
    Really?
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22448 replies14 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Would you be surprised if Harvard didn't accept the AP courses? If the medical school required the course be taken at a 4 year college and not a community college?

    I'm a big believer that AP courses are NOT 'just like college.' As said above, the school gets to decide what it requires for ANY degree. English for an engineer? Yep. Foreign language for a Dance major? Required.

    Many Catholic schools require theology classes even if the students already took 4 years of religion in high school, even if the student is majoring in math, even if the student is an atheist. It's a requirement of the program.
    It’s amazing that most parents don’t advocate for a well rounded education for their children and instead meekly go along with whatever the academic powers require or recommend.

    What makes it NOT well rounded to require calculus? To me, requiring math-and English, a history class, and a foreign language - is what makes it well rounded. My daughter's school requires every student in the school to take Wyoming History. Every student, even if that student will be moving to Japan after graduation, and even if the student will be spend 100% of his time in a lab and doesn't care about Wyoming history. It's required for students who already took it in high school (also required) and even if the student went to Boy's/Girl's state and was elected acting Governor. It's a state LAW (which you will learn when you take the class). I wasn't about to 'advocate' for an exception or a change to the law.
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