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Class of 2014 Admissions Highlights

johnwesleyjohnwesley - Posts: 4,610 Senior Member
edited September 2010 in Wesleyan University
Wesleyan takes its time publishing the final stats for the entering class (as opposed to the stats for all the people offered admission), but, when it does it's usually sweet. Some highlights:

1) lowest % ever from the northeast (New England+Mid-Atlantic)- 53%
2) highest % of ED applicants - 48%
3) highest % Asian, Asian-American enrollees - 15%
4) Thirty-five percent of the class reported as people of color, including, 9% black/African-American; 9% latino/Hispanic.
5) More people reported as first-gen college goers (16%) than legacies (6%) by nearly 3 to 1.

And this from Senior Dean of Admissions, Greg Pyke, on the subject of financial aid and ED:
“I know that the economy and the uncertainty that people feel about their future keeps a lot of people from making Early Decision commitments to college anywhere, but Wesleyan has done better than a lot of the ED schools at continuing to attract a good pool of socioeconomic diversity within the Early Decision pool as well,” Pyke said.
Profiles of Wesleyan’s Class of 2014 ? The Wesleyan Argus
Post edited by johnwesley on

Replies to: Class of 2014 Admissions Highlights

  • johnwesleyjohnwesley - Posts: 4,610 Senior Member
    Wesleyan takes its time publishing the final stats for the entering class (as opposed to the stats for all the people offered admission), but, when it does it's usually sweet. Some highlights:

    1) lowest % ever from the northeast (New England+Mid-Atlantic)- 54%
    2) highest % of ED applicants - 48%
    3) highest % Asian, Asian-American enrollees - 15%
    4) Thirty-four percent of the class reported as people of color, including, 9% black/African-American; 9% latino/Hispanic.
    5) More people reported as first-gen college goers (14%) than legacies (6%) by more than 2 to 1.

    And this from Senior Dean of Admissions, Greg Pyke, on the subject of financial aid and ED:
    “I know that the economy and the uncertainty that people feel about their future keeps a lot of people from making Early Decision commitments to college anywhere, but Wesleyan has done better than a lot of the ED schools at continuing to attract a good pool of socioeconomic diversity within the Early Decision pool as well,” Pyke said.

    Profiles of Wesleyan’s Class of 2014 ? The Wesleyan Argus
    [apologies for the double post, but I had to correct some slight errors in the geographic, first-gen and people of color stats - my bad.]
  • sidpersonsidperson Registered User Posts: 19 New Member
    It's interesting that, despite the dramatic increase in applications over the past few years, the test scores of the incoming classes have remained the same. Does the increase in applications reflect that Wes is becoming a more popular safe school for Ivy types than it was in the past?
  • johnwesleyjohnwesley - Posts: 4,610 Senior Member
    It may; there's certainly nothing wrong with being mentioned in the same breath with Columbia, Brown and Cornell. It may also reflect a certain trade-off between increasing geographic diversity, and gaining higher test scores. A lot of students west of the Mississippi (and quite a few east of it) take the ACT in lieu of the SAT, so you're not necessarily going to see an uptick in the latter; it also wouldn't surprise me if a kid from Kansas or South Dakota were able to get into Wesleyan with slightly lower scores than someone from New York City or Boston.
  • smartalic34smartalic34 Registered User Posts: 781 Member
    Also, Wesleyan probably offers, on average, slightly more loans and less grants than Williams/Amherst/Swarthmore, so it's going to lose the top cross-admits on money alone. I'm sure in some cases Wes offers better money, but on average, I bet the top kids are choosing Wesleyan's Little Three rivals because a few thousand dollars is making a difference.

    Edit: With an admit rate of 20% (Williams 18% for comparison), Wesleyan can hardly be quantified as a "safe" school for anyone...
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