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Chances of getting into Yale (an Ivy League) or top school?

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Replies to: Chances of getting into Yale (an Ivy League) or top school?

  • coolguy40coolguy40 Registered User Posts: 1,856 Senior Member
    The worst part of dream schools is not getting rejected, it's actually getting accepted. If I have a dream of owning a Ford SUV, I'm going to buy a Ford SUV. That doesn't mean that a FORD or even an SUV is a good car for me. The way to know is to ask myself, "What's the goal? Commuting to work? Road trips?" Dreams directly convert to tangible measurable accomplishments later. What's the goal? Being a doctor? Being a lawyer?, etc. That's a dream. A fantasy is anything that takes your focus away from that. A degree at Yale is a REALLY REALLY big fantasy because it doesn't make a direct contribution to the end goal.
  • CatherinaJ10123CatherinaJ10123 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    My mom would hop around to community colleges when she was pregnant with me and eventually stop school to make up the money for more classes. So she thankfully got her masters in teaching. My biological father didn’t go to college and was never around. But they’re both 1st generations in the US.
  • BKSquaredBKSquared Registered User Posts: 1,037 Senior Member
    First gen means are you the first in your family to go to college, not your family's immigration status. If your mom has a masters, you are not first gen within the college admissions meaning.

    Sure you can shoot for moon and continue to do your best. Just don't get fixated on a few schools with single digit admissions rates and use that as an indicator of success or failure.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 72,863 Senior Member
    My mom would hop around to community colleges when she was pregnant with me and eventually stop school to make up the money for more classes. So she thankfully got her masters in teaching. My biological father didn’t go to college and was never around.

    If they are divorced, you may want to read https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/financial-aid-scholarships/2083835-faq-divorced-parents-financial-aid-and-net-price-calculators.html and then figure out the financial aid situation at each college you apply to.
  • MWolfMWolf Registered User Posts: 165 Junior Member
    edited January 12
    The real question is "what are you looking for in a college?". "Yale" and "Harvard" may just be code in your mind for "prestigious colleges". That doesn't mean that they're The Best, and it definitely doesn't mean that they're the best for you. Maybe you'd do better and be happier in a Liberal Arts College, or maybe in a large public school.

    Forgive me if I'm totally wrong, but it seems to me that your entire "Yale dream" ends when you are accepted into Yale. You need to find a college in which you'll do well, grow, learn, and ultimately succeed. Those should be the focus of your college search, not that shining moment when you get that coveted letter of acceptance. It's kinda like thinking that having a child is something that ends at birth.

    Your college search and decision should focus on what happens AFTER you are accepted. Figure out what you want from a college, what you need from a college, and what you think will help you succeed in college, over the four years you will spend in college.

    Start learning about the other 30 or more schools that are a great fit for somebody with your stats, interests and personality. Don't focus on what you think you will feel when you're accepted, or what people will say. Think about what the four years of college will be like.

    Your school counselor, friends and siblings of friends, admissions officers are all great sources for information that you won't find in school brochures. Look across the CC forums to see what students and parents are saying about different schools. Do college searches on Naviance's Super Match, Niche, Princeton Review, and others using search criteria that you find important. Expand your idea of what your Dream School is beyond the fact that you've heard of them as being The Best Schools That Everybody Has Heard About.
  • merc81merc81 Registered User Posts: 8,990 Senior Member
    edited January 12
    Based on your indicated interests, @CatherinaJ10123, you'll have many colleges to consider, Yale among them:

    The 10 Best Colleges for Creative Writers | The Freelancer
    http://contently.net/2014/11/06/resources/10-best-colleges-creative-writers/

    The 25 Most Literary Colleges in America | Flavorwire
    http://flavorwire.com/409437/the-25-most-literary-colleges-in-america
  • CatherinaJ10123CatherinaJ10123 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Okay. Thank you all for answering my question!
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