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what are my chances at ivy

rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
edited August 13 in What Are My Chances?
creds are
3.9uw 4.6 w
1570 sat
no act
10 APs-- 8 5s, rest 4s
sat 2 math 800, sat chem 800,
honor roll, AP scholar, others and etc
the biggest award, 6th place at study camp for Chemistry Olympiad
Biggest EC, 100+ hours research at MAYO CLINIC
150+ volunteer hours
edited August 13
30 replies
Post edited by MaineLonghorn on
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Replies to: what are my chances at ivy

  • momtogirls2momtogirls2 789 replies4 postsRegistered User Member
    Your chances are decent but like everyone make sure you have other schools you will be happy to attend and can afford. Basically apply but don't fixate on ivy league schools.
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  • joecollege44joecollege44 54 replies3 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    well since you have basically perfect scores and grades, it seems obvious you have a good chance. not a guarantee though. have you visited any of them? which ones do you like?
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  • happy1happy1 22659 replies2223 postsVerified Member Senior Member
    edited August 13
    You look to be a competitive applicant with academics and ECs that should get you a serious look at any college. The rest will depend on things we can't see such as your essays, LORs, depth of your ECs etc.

    As others have said any elite college (with acceptance rates often in the single digits) should be considered a reach for any unhooked applicant. Be sure to take the time to search out a group of match and safety schools that appear affordable (run net price calculators) and that you would be excited to attend.
    edited August 13
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    thank you guys for your answers.
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  • Gogreen19Gogreen19 24 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @rkalahasty I notice you mentioned only your biggest EC and award. In order to chance you properly, we will need to know all of your ECs, awards and which ivies you are targeting, as they are all very different.
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  • Gogreen19Gogreen19 24 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Your intended field or fields of study is also important for us to know.
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  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 8739 replies321 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @gogreen19, It's great that you got accepted to Dartmouth, but that doesn't make you an expert on Ivy admissions. Chancing is a parlor game. The best we can do is tell students that their stats are competitive and there are no red flags. Knowing all the ECs and awards OP has won't really matter. The application is more than stats and awards.
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  • Gogreen19Gogreen19 24 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @austinmshauri thank you for your input, and given all you know about me, your reaction is warranted, but you don't know everything about me. I have many friends and family members who go to these schools and have been deeply involved in researching these schools for a long time and, not to mention, have been a kind of unofficial college counselor to my classmates and others for a long time. In fact, I was trusted more than the official counselors after a while, since my advice actually worked for people more often.

    And, by the way, one does need to know more to give the detailed chance analysis that I like to give. I always look deeply into a student and their ECs and interests when I give them chance analyses. Also, the various awards and ECs are crucial to understanding whether a student has excelled in a number of fields or focused on say, one specific field, which in turn helps identify a student's academic fit for type of uni. Not to mention, the intended field or fields of study (and whether or not the ECs are related to it) should also help decide which uni to apply to. It's not just me saying that. Other admits, college counselors and admission officers say various versions of the advice I give to applicants all the time.

    Do I think I'm the repository of all wisdom and can tell for sure if someone will or will not get in? Obviously not, it's a crapshoot. But can I in some respect help identify academic fit, and give advice that may give students some help in raising their chances? I think so.
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  • coolguy40coolguy40 1986 replies2 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Shop around. You're the one choosing the school, not them. Make sure the school you choose is affordable and a good fit. You'll probably change your at least once before you settle on something to study, so make sure there's flexibility.
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Ok so I see many people asking for more info so here it is
    3.95 Unweighted GPA 4.6 weighted
    1570 sat
    no act
    10 APs-- 8 5s, rest 4s
    sat 2 math 800, sat chem 800, sat Biology 800, sat physics 780,
    honor roll, AP scholar, others and etc
    Awards and honors, 6th place at study camp CHEMISTRY OLYMPIAD, 2nd alternate for the international team. Science olympiad 2 golds. Robotics team, 3rd in states. National merit scholarship finalist.
    EC, 100 hours mayo clinic electrophysiology research, Pre-med club(founder, president), science olympiad team (Team Captain), quiz bowl, (Captain), robotics team (Captain), Advanced Chem Club (founder, president). (I also made a ping pong club at my school, but it was just for fun so I probably won't be including it)
    150+ volunteer hours, half spent tutoring kids in math, another half in chemistry. I tutored kids in math, mostly elementary school.
    Rec letters from a top cardiologist at mayo clinic, CHEM teacher, Principle of the school
    Went to Thomas Jefferson high school for science and technology. (TJHSST)
    hope that's enough guys, had
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Oh and i went up to AIMEs
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Updated version of stats
    Ok so I see many people asking for more info so here it is
    3.95 Unweighted GPA 4.6 weighted
    1570 sat
    Post APs , intro to orgo, orgo, multivariable calc, linear algebra, differential equations, neurobiology, electrodynamics. (these classes were sorta scary).
    10 APs-- 8 5s, rest 4s
    sat 2 math 800, sat chem 800, sat Biology 800, sat physics 780,
    honor roll, AP scholar, others and etc
    Awards and honors, 6th place at study camp CHEMISTRY OLYMPIAD, 2nd alternate for the international team. Science olympiad 2 golds. Robotics team, 3rd in states. National merit scholarship finalist. Went up to AIMEs.
    EC, 100 hours mayo clinic electrophysiology research, Pre-med club(founder, president), science olympiad team (Team Captain), quiz bowl, (Captain), robotics team (Captain), Advanced Chem Club (founder, president). (I also made a ping pong club at my school, but it was just for fun so I probably won't be including it), played Tennis, no awards.
    150+ volunteer hours, half spent tutoring kids in math, another half in chemistry. I tutored kids in math, mostly elementary school.
    Rec letters from a top cardiologist at mayo clinic, CHEM teacher, Principle of the school
    Went to Thomas Jefferson high school for science and technology. (TJHSST)
    No Legacy
    hope that's enough guys,
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  • blossomblossom 9680 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    You go to TJ, so your guidance counselors have more experience with elite school admissions than almost any other public HS in the country.

    And you're asking a bunch of strangers on the internet including a Dartmouth pre-frosh?
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    yeah, my guidance counselor says I have a good chance, but I have gotten some great info of here about studying for olympiads and such, so I thought I would ask.
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  • OctagonOctagon 178 replies5 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    If I were you, I would ED to Johns Hopkins.
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  • Gogreen19Gogreen19 24 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    What's your intended major or field(s) of study? Also, which ivies are you targeting?
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    i am applying for biology, I am targeting, brown, Columbia, Cornell, Upenn, Princeton, Yale, and finally Harvard. In least to greatest from that order.
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    Octagon wrote: »
    If I were you, I would ED to Johns Hopkins.

    Yeah, great school, not a fan of the area...
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  • rkalahastyrkalahasty 16 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    I know Bio is really competitive, but I believe my awards in Chemistry, (6th place out of 11,000 students and others) can back it up, As well as my extensive cardiology research.
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  • Gogreen19Gogreen19 24 replies0 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @rkalahasty you seem qualified, but I think you may want to think over what kind of undergraduate education you want. You see, Cornell and Penn on your list are all about vocational learning i.e. if you go there to study biology, you will, for the most part, stay within the bounds of biology and take courses related to that for your education. The other schools on your list have undergraduate liberal arts curriculums, which means they like applicants who want a more diverse education, specializing in something but also taking courses related to other fields for the purposes of interdisciplinary education, since that is what the liberal arts curriculum gives to students.

    Also, besides that, some schools on your list have decidedly contrasting views on education even within the liberal arts. Columbia and Brown are exact curricular opposites. Columbia's core curriculum means that a quarter to a third of your courses as an undergrad are decided for you, since the core means that there are a number of courses that all undergrads are required to take. You may like that, or may not, but you should consider it. They have many Columbia-specific courses that I found quite interesting. Brown, meanwhile has the open curriculum, meaning that you have almost no requirements to fulfill and can take courses from multiple fields, building your own concentration of multiple fields you are interested in without having to worry about requirements you may have to fulfill.

    Additionally, some of the schools on your list like Harvard, Columbia and Penn are in large cities and, to an extent, have a city-based social life and atmosphere. Others like Princeton and Yale are small city schools, with a more campus-based social life and atmosphere.

    These are just things to consider, Which side of any of these factors you prefer will help dictate fit, which is perhaps the strongest factor college admissions officers look at for their decisions. It will also help tell you if some of these schools might be better replaced with other top tier schools that best fit what you want out of a college experience. Also, Princeton and Brown on this list (and to a lesser extent, Yale) are the only ones which are undergraduate-focused. The rest have more of postgrad focus, so small class sizes, participation in research, and close contact with professors would be harder to come by in the latter category.

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