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What are some perks of attending an all women's college?

Almostout2k19Almostout2k19 36 replies4 threads Junior Member
I just wanted to know what the pros and cons were verses attending a co-ed college? What does the future of all women's colleges look like?
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Replies to: What are some perks of attending an all women's college?

  • damon30damon30 1147 replies5 threads Senior Member
    One advantage of a women's college is that it is easier for a student interested in a traditionally "male" field to complete a degree in that field.

    Wellesley and Mount Holyoke have well-regarded CS programs: https://www.ivyachievement.com/computer-science-rankings
    It is notable that despite completely different methodology, all but two of the IvyAchievement CS Top 40 schools are in the U.S. News top 52, if they are ranked. Schools in the IvyAchievement CS Employment Top 40 not ranked by U.S. News include two co-ed liberal arts colleges (Harvey Mudd and Pomona College); women’s liberal arts colleges (Wellesley and Mount Holyoke); two state universities in California (San Jose State and Cal Poly); and two private universities in major tech hubs (Santa Clara University and Seattle University). Because these schools are not ranked by U.S. News, we believe they are overlooked by aspiring computer science applicants, especially international applicants who may be less familiar with non-flagship state schools and liberal arts colleges.

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  • MidwestmomofboysMidwestmomofboys 4215 replies27 threads Senior Member
    edited April 2019
    I should add -- I attended my women's college because of finances -- it was my safety school for admissions and finances. I had an incredible education, had amazing opportunities to grow, and formed life long friendships.
    edited April 2019
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  • HiToWaMomHiToWaMom 1486 replies19 threads Senior Member
    I cannot agree with above comments more.

    At women's colleges, wherever you look, the leaders are all women --- clubs, associations, researches, committees, school government, etc. etc.

    Traditionally, these roles have been assigned to male students (although it's changing).

    At women's colleges, students are reminded that they can take on these leadership roles without male presence and that is a huge confidence boost whereas at co-ed schools, female students might fall into secondary/assisting roles and might take it for granted or not even question about it.
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  • SophleySophley 467 replies2 threads Member
    I graduated from a women’s college two decades ago. On the night I moved into my dorm, I had almost a dozen guys in my dorm room from Washington and Lee University. First one on the floor to have a party. Boys will be around!

    I appreciate that I had a chance to build strong lifelong friends with some very smart women. And it was nice that guys weren’t in the way of my education. I could focus fully on what I wanted Monday thru Friday at noon and then focus on fun on the weekends. Less drama. Less complications. I still had boyfriends at nearby schools but they weren’t the central focus of my life. Best yet, I found my own voice and grew in confidence because I was surrounded by strong women and leaders.
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  • MinivanmummyMinivanmummy 1 replies0 threads New Member
    I think it depends on what you are looking for. Some of the benefits of Women's colleges are obviously that there is the freedom to express yourself without having to censor what you say, for fear of retaliation from male students. As a Mills college graduate, I found that there was immense women empowerment, building of sisterhood and a solid focus on the academics.
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  • RiversiderRiversider 934 replies111 threads Senior Member
    edited September 2019
    There are few pros and many cons. Gender segregation is no more useful than racial or economic segregation on individual or communal level. If it was, Saudi Arabia would be ahead of all others. It’s just not a healthy set up, only an artificial bubble.
    edited September 2019
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  • jym626jym626 57824 replies3031 threads Senior Member
    edited September 2019
    @Midwestmomofboys and @lookingforward are spot on. I was at Vassar just after it went coed, and yes, even though it was still, at that time, 75% women, the men did come in and take many leadership roles.

    Womens’ colleges encourage a focus on women as leaders, as successful critical thinkers and problem-solvers, offer a superb collaborative and commonly less competitive environment where they can thrive in high levels of academic challenge in majors where they might in the past have been underrepresented, where women are encouraged to find and share their collective voice and encouraged to question, to challenge with lessened social pressures and a clear focus on the promotion of womens’ education and success personally, psychologically and vocationally.

    @Riversider the post above and the one about psychiatrists/psychologists personal relationships are disappointingly off the mark tonight. That’s not like you.
    edited September 2019
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  • RiversiderRiversider 934 replies111 threads Senior Member
    edited September 2019
    @jym626 I’m sorry. I didn’t mean to be rude. We have a difference of opinion on these issues. I guess we’ll have to agree to disagree.
    edited September 2019
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 30510 replies59 threads Senior Member
    I believe the women’s colleges are becoming more popular these days. Selectivity is up as are the stats of the students. There was s time when they were losing their luster, but because of their strong infrastructures, curriculums, traditions and faculty, were very good admissions bargains those years.

    I did not care to go to a women’s college but my close friend from high school did—Vassar actually. I dare say she had a much smoother academic journey than I did. I will say, that I preferred an all women’s dorm on a coed a campus, and still would.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 25011 replies20 threads Senior Member
    At women's colleges, students are reminded that they can take on these leadership roles without male presence and that is a huge confidence boost whereas at co-ed schools, female students might fall into secondary/assisting roles and might take it for granted or not even question about it.

    And at Harvard women can't even form their own clubs or organization.
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  • jym626jym626 57824 replies3031 threads Senior Member
    Exactly, @Dustyfeathers. Well said. Anyone who thinks single sex colleges are unhealthy has a very misunderstood view of the academic environment.
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  • mtibbymtibby 1 replies0 threads New Member
    @Riversider Implying that overall perceived negativity of one society must apply to all other societies that share a single characteristic but in fact the societies have vast differences? False equivalence.

    I sincerely hope that prospective students consider the true benefits and downsides of attending an all women’s college and don’t apply such reductionist logic.
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  • CountryMom2CountryMom2 5 replies1 threads New Member
    The perks, I suppose, are the community of women - feeling supported, tight-knit after graduation, opening doors especially for names schools like the Seven Sisters.

    That said, I went to a well-renowned all-girls' high school, and believe that single-sex education is overrated. Colleges are very different, I'm sure, but I was grateful to go to a large co-ed Ivy, living in a coed dorm, having normal relationships that were a part of my everyday (working on campus, classes, dorms, etc.). There's also the not-so-small-matter of the true "college experience" - football/hockey/soccer games, frat parties, dorm wars that clearly were organized by the boys on our floor. We even had a coed bathroom. Having men around felt healthy and balanced - and there were single-sex dorms for those who wanted that experienced. I was in a sorority, and I liked that support on a big campus.

    My only regret? Agreeing to attend that all-girls' high school. My sister went to Smith and loved it. Northampton is gorgeous and fun, but dating was a bit awkward and forced, according to her. It's a great fit for some people - I liked the college town, big campus experience while having my close group of sorority sisters, dorm friends, and classmates.
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  • CountryMom2CountryMom2 5 replies1 threads New Member
    That's because Harvard was one of the last Ivies to go coed. Now Cornell, for example, was coed since its founding in 1865 ;-)
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  • CountryMom2CountryMom2 5 replies1 threads New Member
    Sophley wrote: »
    Best yet, I found my own voice and grew in confidence because I was surrounded by strong women and leaders.

    And that's what I was told when I went to an all-girls' high school. Instead I found greater leadership and strong women at my coed university. To each his (or her) own.

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