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Replies to: "Race" in College Applications FAQ & Discussion 12

  • cappexcappex Registered User Posts: 515 Member
    It would nice to have some labeling
  • lostaccountlostaccount Registered User Posts: 4,568 Senior Member
    edited December 2015
    If you were born in the US, how are you Asian? Am I missing something? Can you explain?? Also, isn't saying you are Asian like saying I am European? Aren't there more differences across different countries of origin then similarities? If born in the US why aren't you just American???
  • lostaccountlostaccount Registered User Posts: 4,568 Senior Member
    Well this one is none too obvious!
  • bjkmombjkmom Registered User Posts: 2,808 Senior Member
    My son was adopted from Korea at the age of 7 months.

    He's an American citizen; he no longer has Korean citizenship.

    But he is Asian.
  • wisteria100wisteria100 Registered User Posts: 1,997 Senior Member
    @GMTplus7 Lol. Thanks for a good laugh
  • lostaccountlostaccount Registered User Posts: 4,568 Senior Member
    So if someone's ancestors came from an Japan 6 generations ago they are still "Asian"? How about if your ancestors came from Ireland 6 generations ago. Are you Irish? What is it about "Asian" that results in that being continued whereas those with Irish ancestors identify as American?
  • elliebhamelliebham Registered User Posts: 855 Member
    Plenty of people in the US identify with their Irish heritage even if they've been in the US for generations.
  • wisteria100wisteria100 Registered User Posts: 1,997 Senior Member
    Nationality is different than race.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 21,217 Super Moderator
    edited December 2015
    So if someone's ancestors came from an Japan 6 generations ago they are still "Asian"?
    Yes.
    What is it about "Asian" that results in that being continued whereas those with Irish ancestors identify as American?
    Because Asian is a race. Ireland is 95% white/caucasian. If one of them moved to the US, they'd still be white.
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 8,965 Senior Member
    I have always considered myself Irish-American even though my ancestors came over in steerage 150 years ago.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    So if someone's ancestors came from an Japan 6 generations ago they are still "Asian"?

    Yes, they're still racially asian. But if their ancestors moved to Peru, then they are asian hispanic, like Alberto Fujimori, former Prime Minister of Peru, is.

    Hispanic is the only category w arbitrary rhyme & reason.

  • coffeeaddictedcoffeeaddicted Registered User Posts: 438 Member
    How much does the way someone looks influence their racial classification?

    I am half white and appear almost exclusively white, but my siblings (both same parents) are much darker than me. It's to the point where I check the "white" box and my sister checks the "other" box, when you can only check one.

    My mom is half black, half Asian and my dad is white. Would I check off just white; white, African-American, and Asian; or white and African-American because that would give me an advantage? My mom only checked off African-American when she was applying to college, but I feel like for me this is unfairly gaming the system, since I've never dealt with the racial discrimination that black people (like my mom) have dealt with.
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