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Highest IQ Majors

CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
edited January 20 in College Majors
https://www.google.com/amp/s/thetab.com/us/2017/04/10/which-major-has-highest-iq-64811/amp

Physics, Mathematics, Economics, Philosophy and engineering are on top of the list.

Unfortunately Education, Social Work, Psychology are at the bottom.
edited January 20
43 replies
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Replies to: Highest IQ Majors

  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
    Agreed but it’s just a simple list based on data about attracting and retaining higher percentage of high IQ/high stats people.
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 1916 replies31 threads Senior Member
    milgymfam wrote: »
    What a silly list. My IQ is on the higher end of this list and I chose to major in something near the bottom- and then to be a stay-at-homeschooling mom. People are not locked into career choice based on IQ.

    No one claimed they were. As the saying goes, the plural of anecdote is not data. Every one of these undoubtedly has data points at either extreme.

    Why post? Well, It’s a post about college majors in a forum entitled “College Majors”.

    It’s simply a statistical set of aggregated data. I’ll never understand why people get offended by facts.
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  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    Until we have better ways to predict ability and competence, standardized testing like IQ and SAT will not go obsolete.

    As far as “why this is post-worthy?”, this is relevant and interesting ... even if not as interesting as CC threads about Megxit, Your Best Buy, and Roasting Vegetables.
    edited January 21
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3338 replies63 threads Senior Member
    Until we have better ways to predict ability and competence, standardized testing like IQ and SAT will not go obsolete.

    IQ and SAT don't measure the same thing.

    I'm not even sure many people/kids/students get their IQs tested any more.....it's not done in Illinois schools....so seems one would need to go to an outside testing service to have it done. And in that case, why?
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  • hebegebehebegebe 2790 replies39 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    Whats even more ludicrous is the fact that IQ is measured by standardized tests, while it is acknowledged by anybody who studies human intelligence that the highest measure of intelligence is the ability to solve novel situation in novel ways.
    Anti-testers are a bit like anti-vaxxers. Both schools of thought seem to thrive in America despite worldwide evidence.

    Admission to Peking University or Tsinghua in China, IIT in India, or Seoul National University in Korea are largely decided based upon high scores in the national tests. If your assertion that standardized tests don't measure intelligence was actually correct, then graduates from these would not outperform graduates from other colleges. But if you actually look at what these graduates achieve, even outside their home country, you would be hard pressed to find another explanation. In Silicon Valley, a large percentage of successful startups are founded by graduates of China's C9 and India's IIT.

    Note that I personally am against high-stress one-and-done exams that these countries use. I think that a combination of standardized tests (that can be taken more than once) and rigor-adjusted grades are the best approach. Not a fan of superscoring either.
    It is also beyond ridiculous to claim that IQ tests measure something innate, when it is possible to improve one's testing results by training.
    A few practice tests are useful to understand the rules and recommended approach of the test. After that, appreciable improvements only happen on low-ceiling tests like the current versions of the SAT and ACT. Historical versions of the SAT in particular had a very high ceiling, and scores above 750, particularly in English, were rare. Likewise, the tests in the countries I mentioned above have very high ceilings.
    edited January 21
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  • sushirittosushiritto 4784 replies18 threads Senior Member
    Mwfan1921 wrote: »
    Until we have better ways to predict ability and competence, standardized testing like IQ and SAT will not go obsolete.

    IQ and SAT don't measure the same thing.

    I'm not even sure many people/kids/students get their IQs tested any more.....it's not done in Illinois schools....so seems one would need to go to an outside testing service to have it done. And in that case, why?

    CupCakeMuffins states "to predict ability and competence" and never said they measure the same thing.

    Why do humans test their IQ's? We like to measure things. Why do we use services like "23 and me" and doggie genetic makeup services?

    I chose to read this thread, which interests me much more than reading about a "which purse to buy" thread. :smiley:
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3338 replies63 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    sushiritto wrote: »
    Mwfan1921 wrote: »
    Until we have better ways to predict ability and competence, standardized testing like IQ and SAT will not go obsolete.

    IQ and SAT don't measure the same thing.

    I'm not even sure many people/kids/students get their IQs tested any more.....it's not done in Illinois schools....so seems one would need to go to an outside testing service to have it done. And in that case, why?

    CupCakeMuffins states "to predict ability and competence" and never said they measure the same thing.

    Why do humans test their IQ's? We like to measure things. Why do we use services like "23 and me" and doggie genetic makeup services?

    I chose to read this thread, which interests me much more than reading about a "which purse to buy" thread. :smiley:

    Understood. My (poorly!) made point was it doesn't seem many humans have their IQs tested any more(whether thru school or independently).....it seems to have fallen in importance and usage in the last couple of decades.

    It seems there aren't many corporations, organizations, or schools (except MENSA, and even there one can substitute test scores when joining which doesn't make sense!) that use IQ as a way to predict ability and competence. Sure, many companies use various tests when evaluating potential employees, but those tests seem to have shifted focus from those with a pure brain power measurement (frequently not IQ based/proxy anyway) to those that evaluate many skills including teamwork, emotional intelligence, grit, etc.
    edited January 21
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  • hebegebehebegebe 2790 replies39 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    It seems there aren't many corporations, organizations, or schools (except MENSA, and even there one can substitute test scores when joining which doesn't make sense!) that use IQ as a way to predict ability and competence.
    IQ tests used for hiring purposes have been illegal in the US since 1971 unless there is justification as to why they are required. See:

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griggs_v._Duke_Power_Co.

    edited January 21
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  • sushirittosushiritto 4784 replies18 threads Senior Member
    I don't know how common IQ testing is today, but I do know that there are some parents who do test their children. The kids that I've heard about through the grapevine are the kids with IQ's at either end of the spectrum.
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  • Twoin18Twoin18 1858 replies18 threads Senior Member
    sushiritto wrote: »
    I don't know how common IQ testing is today, but I do know that there are some parents who do test their children. The kids that I've heard about through the grapevine are the kids with IQ's at either end of the spectrum.

    WISC-V includes a full scale IQ test and is one of the diagnosis tests typically used as part of the psychological testing for learning disabilities including ADHD (see https://www.brighthubeducation.com/special-ed-behavioral-disorders/67066-adhd-testing-using-the-wechsler-intelligence-scale-for-children/)
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  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    Most school districts use tests like MAP, COGAT, EXPLORE, Stanford Binet and others to mark and monitor gifted students. Do these tests have an IQ component or are they purely achievement based?
    edited January 21
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  • evergreen5evergreen5 1655 replies33 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    ^Many school districts use ability screening tests like the CogAT, which is explicitly not an IQ test, to find gifted students. MAP is an achievement test often given to all students to track academic progress. EXPLORE is a middle school test by ACT, though I'm not sure whether it looks at achievement or ability (it is not an IQ test).

    Stanford-Binet is an IQ test, though it is not typical for school districts to administer actual IQ tests for the purpose of identifying gifted students because it is expensive and time-consuming. IQ testing is far more common in the context of diagnosing learning issues, especially by private providers. Some private gifted schools may require private IQ testing for admission.
    edited January 21
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  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
    edited January 21
    Following paragraph explains value of this topic better than I did.

    “Do students who choose to major in different fields have different academic aptitudes? This question is worth investigating for many reasons, including an understanding of what fields top students choose to pursue, the diversity of talent across various fields, and how this might reflect upon the majors and occupations a culture values.”

    https://qz.com/334926/your-college-major-is-a-pretty-good-indication-of-how-smart-you-are/


    Here is a limited study about Physics, Maths, Economics, Philosophy and International Relations majors scoring highest on LSAT.

    http://www.people.vcu.edu/~emillner/Economics/lsat.htm
    edited January 21
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 80204 replies720 threads Senior Member
    Do these tests have an IQ component or are they purely achievement based?

    It is hard to test IQ without being confounded by achievement or knowledge of the types of things that IQ tests (or tests that are claimed to be like IQ tests like the SAT) depend on as a basis.

    Note that tests for achievement do not have this problem, because it is not necessary to separate intelligence from achievement, since intelligence is part (though not all) of what produces achievement.
    Here is a limited study about Physics, Maths, Economics, Philosophy and International Relations majors scoring highest on LSAT.

    http://www.people.vcu.edu/~emillner/Economics/lsat.htm

    Is the LSAT claimed to be an IQ test?

    In any case, the often forgotten about logic puzzle section of the LSAT makes it not surprising that math and philosophy majors do well on it.
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  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins 1050 replies98 threads Senior Member
    edited January 22
    Correct. Achievement and intelligence tend to have a strong connection.

    About LSAT, i don’t know if it claims it or not but like other standardized tests, similar majors score highest there and on MCAT as well. Humanities did best on GRE’s verbal and Math/Physics on quant portion.

    It’s all pretty much useless information for an individual but nonetheless interesting stuff.
    edited January 22
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  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger 2989 replies161 threads Senior Member
    It seems there aren't many corporations, organizations, or schools (except MENSA, and even there one can substitute test scores when joining which doesn't make sense!) that use IQ as a way to predict ability and competence. Sure, many companies use various tests when evaluating potential employees, but those tests seem to have shifted focus from those with a pure brain power measurement (frequently not IQ based/proxy anyway) to those that evaluate many skills including teamwork, emotional intelligence, grit, etc.

    There are fields and companies that use high school SAT score for hiring purposes. Although their lawyers won’t let them admit this, they are using high school SAT as a proxy for IQ.
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  • Data10Data10 3297 replies11 threads Senior Member
    edited January 22
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/thetab.com/us/2017/04/10/which-major-has-highest-iq-64811/amp

    Physics, Mathematics, Economics, Philosophy and engineering are on top of the list.

    Unfortunately Education, Social Work, Psychology are at the bottom.

    They don't explain methodology, but looking at the list, I believe it is solely based on the average GRE scores by planned graduate major grouping as listed at https://www.ets.org/s/gre/pdf/gre_guide_table4.pdf . The article came out in 2017, so they are using an older version of the GRE scores by major than the linked table, but the general order is still extremely similar . I believe they are using a direct conversion of GRE VR score + QRE QR sections, ignoring the AW section. If you also include AW, the results are more in favor of humanities since only 1/3 is quantitative. Their conversion of what GRE VR + GRE QR converts to what IQ seems completely arbitrary. The scale appears to be something simple, in the form IQ = GRE VR + GRE QR - k, where k is a constant. Obviously this is nonsensical.

    If anyone is curious, the highest GRE scores by major for the current 2015-18 sample are below. I listed them in order from highest to lowest. I only included majors with at least 1000 students. I realize one cannot assume all majors are reflective of the average for small portion of students choose to take the GRE.

    Highest GRE VR Score
    1. Philosophy* -- 160
    2. Creative Writing -- 158
    2. European History -- 158
    2. Religion & Theology -- 158
    5. Art History, Theory, and... -- 157
    5. English Language -- 157
    5. Political Science -- 157
    5. Humanities Arts: Other -- 157
    5. Library Sciences -- 157
    5. Various Small Submajors -- 157
    *Philosophy sub-grouping of philosophy broad category

    Highest GRE QR Score
    1. Statistics -- 164
    2. Applied Mathematics -- 163
    2. Mathematics -- 163
    2. Materials Science -- 163
    2. Materials Engineering* -- 163
    6. Physics -- 162
    7. Chemical Engineering -- 161
    7. Finance -- 161
    7. Electrical Engineering -- 161
    *ME sub-grouping of ME broad category

    Highest GRE AW Score
    1. English Literature -- 4.3
    1. European History -- 4.3
    1. Philosophy* -- 4.3
    1. Public Policy Analysis -- 4.3
    5. American History -- 4.2
    5. Creative Writing -- 4.2
    5. English Language -- 4.2
    5. History: Other -- 4.2
    5. International Relations -- 4.2
    5. Neurosciences -- 4.2
    5. Political Science -- 4.2
    5. Religion & Theology -- 4.2
    *Philosophy sub-grouping of philosophy broad category
    edited January 22
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