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Getting Accepted does NOT mean that a Merit Scholarship will be forthcoming....

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Replies to: Getting Accepted does NOT mean that a Merit Scholarship will be forthcoming....

  • EyeleenEyeleen Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    How about a university that sends promotional material (on a weekly basis) to a high performing student promising merit aid for a combination of certain test scores and GPA? A targeted campaign! AND then places the applicant on the waitlist. This is, at a minimum, unethical. The cost of applying to several colleges is not insignificant, and schools that employ these strategies to increase application numbers should be fined.
  • menloparkmommenloparkmom Registered User Posts: 12,752 Senior Member
    "How about a university that sends promotional material (on a weekly basis) to a high performing student promising merit aid for a combination of certain test scores and GPA? .AND then places the applicant on the waitlist. "

    @Eyeleen
    I know its hard to accept BUT Universities employ Enrollment Management marketing companies to increase the # of applicants. Just as other companies pay advertising companies to try to entice you to consider buying a Mercedes. Enrollment management companies have NO input with admissions committees regarding who is or is not accepted. It sucks but it is what it is.
    For instance, Wash U has a NOTORIOUS reputation for WL's THOUSANDS of students who do NOT apply ED.

    What parents NEED to do is research stats of ACCEPTED applicants at colleges. That is best done by looking at the Common Data Sets for any colleges you child is considering. Those are public documents can be found here. NOT all colleges participate, but most with competitive admissions do.

    https://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/



  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 20,541 Senior Member
    How about a university that sends promotional material (on a weekly basis) to a high performing student promising merit aid for a combination of certain test scores and GPA?

    It's marketing
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 40,051 Senior Member
    And it's not the university....it's a third party, paid to send promotional materials to all students with x GPA/y scores who live in zip code z. The university doesn't know who the materials were sent to.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 74,311 Senior Member
    @Eyeleen

    Nope. The student needs to get accepted first. Those marketing materials do not promise acceptance.

    My kid got a TON of promotional materials from Wash U St. Louis... but we knew she was more than a longshot for acceptance. IF she had gotten accepted, she would have gotten decent need based aid because her first year, we had two in college. BUT she didn’t bother applying.

    Those mailings are college junk mail plain and simple, and your kid received them because probably they checked a box when taking the SAT or ACT.
  • momof2atlmomof2atl Registered User Posts: 49 Junior Member
    Interesting discussion here. I had to argue with my D19 who has a pretty compelling set of stats and activities to not apply to the ivies. They aren’t in our budget and as we all know, they don’t give merit. I asked her why she wanted to apply, and she admitted it was just to brag. So we nixed it. We did apply to 3 “reaches” that offer very limited merit - Vandy, Duke, and Wash U - but if I’d been more thoughtful we would have only done Duke, as she thought Vandy was just ok after a visit and only applied to Wash U to shut me up (I’m an alum) and she doesn’t want to go. I actually had a harder time trying to explain the reality to my parents.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 74,311 Senior Member
    A better way is put the savings in grandma or grandpa's name and then use it for the final year of college or to pay off any subsidized loans you may have taken.

    Um...no. If the money is YOURS, it doesn’t matter whose bank account it is in. Are you GIVING this money to grandma or grandpa without restrictions as a gift? In other words...not expecting to get it back and allowing them to use it for whatever? If not...it’s YOUR money and needs to be reported as such on the financial aid application forms. Otherwise, you are applying for need based aid using fraudulent information by not including YOUR money.

    @BelknapPoint anything to add?
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 10,946 Senior Member
    I think most households that would qualify for Pell Grant income wise would have a hard time saving a significant amount of money for college.

    And for income under $50,000 if they qualify for simplified needs test, assets aren't considered.
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 10,946 Senior Member
    Let's say a $60,000 income family managed to save up $40,000 for college.

    Let's say asset protection allowance based on age is around $13,000.

    So they would have an increase in FAFSA EFC of around $1,000 (compared to not having the savings) and in both cases would most likely have an EFC too high for Pell anyway.
  • BelknapPointBelknapPoint Registered User Posts: 4,123 Senior Member
    BelknapPoint anything to add?

    Nope. Well said.
  • Cheapdad00Cheapdad00 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    [Besides your "badge of honor" nonsense, @homeeducator, I find it incredulous that anyone would encourage scamming the federal government. I thought, in my naivete, that you, as a parent, are supposed to try to save money for your child's/children's education.

    Relying on others, to pay your bills, just sounds too "entitled" to me. It backfires. Putting down your savings doesn't "disqualify you" for other pay options from the colleges. Also, when you and your child electronically sign the FAFSA app, you are confirming that you have provided truthful information with your signature. Anything else constitutes fraud. ]



    Wouldn't the appropriate step be to put the money in a Roth IRA in the parents name (since it is the parent's money) and then use it to assist in payment of tuition? You can withdraw the contributions out penalty-free to pay for higher education costs. [There may be an impact to future year's aid offset by the amount withdrawn, so people recommend withdrawing in senior year - if you qualify for substantial need based aid.]
  • projectmgrprojectmgr Registered User Posts: 85 Junior Member
    Sorry if this was posted previously but I didn’t see this specific question posed yet...understanding that baseline assumption should be that merit aid is not coming, looking for insights here re: how to best navigate in our daughter’s case.

    She was accepted EA with no initial merit aid to her school of choice. We’re prepared to pay full OOS tuition but would obviously prefer not to unintentionally harm any remaining chance she may have of receiving any merit aid by putting down the official tuition deposit.

    Specifically - does confirming enrollment help or harm either her pending application to the school’s Honor College or potential merit award?

    Ie - does the school think “they haven’t committed yet, so maybe offering Honors College and/or merit aid increase the likelihood of this applicant enrolling?” Or does enrolling/committing now show that the student is truly interested and they’re not risking an Honors spot or merit award to some OOS kid who may not really be interested in attending?

    Thanks in advance for any insights!
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