Chance Me - Ivys/T20

Can we move on from debating where or if the OP falls on the URM continuum. It is what it is.

4 Likes

The finance world, especially investment banking is filled with very pretentious hiring managers. They want students from “target” schools, whatever that means. But in their jargon, this typically translates to higher ranked colleges. Generally the pecking order is Harvard/Stanford/Yale, then other T10 colleges (Columbia, Chicago, Duke, Penn, Brown, etc). Outside of the T20 its hard to get traction for IB jobs. Recently the big banks have started hiring students outside of the traditional targets, but its not easy.

If non-IB finance is what you’re after then there are many colleges where you could get a great education. Being full pay will be a big advantage, especially at need-aware colleges, also out of state publics. UCSD for instance accepts a high percentage of OOS applicants.

Still unclear to me if you are a junior or senior. If you’re still a junior, then retake the SAT, or take the ACT and get your scores up.

1 Like

Yeah, definitely not IB. I have many contacts (relatives, close family friends, etc.) in the areas of finance/consulting I’d maybe go into, so hopefully, they’ll be some help. I’m currently a junior.

What exactly do you mean by “like Babson?” To my knowledge, Babson solely focuses on degrees in business.

Exactly.

editing to add that it has liberal arts courses and is in a consortium with Olin and Wellesley…see next post

1 Like

Regarding Babson, you may want to read this recent post: Match me CA junior looking for target/reach - #15 by Bill_Marsh

If non-IB finance, then please consider a more technical degree like CS, math, statistics, etc. Learning python and R will be valuable in the long run. As long as you have a decent GPA you’ll be fine. Use your connections, as networking and internships are key for finance.

Use binding ED1 and/or ED2 to maximize your chances. Your full pay status will make a huge difference here.

It depends on the school. You pick the school first, and do the major that the school offers. There was a discussion in a recent thread on whether business or Econ is the preferred major for IB. So if you go to Wharton, you do business, if you go to hypsm or Chicago, you do Econ etc…

Even within non IB finance, it is nice to have a quantitative major/minor and an Econ major/minor — eg BB trading jobs or asset management firms etc. Only for explicitly quant finance jobs is it ok to completely drop the Econ major and just do a hard technical major — specifically TCS and or Math. Physics is also fine.

2 Likes

Babson, Bentley.

Lots of focus areas that could work. So whether or not you want a school like that it’s a good suggestion for you to review. Both highly respected. Babson a harder get.

1 Like

If you can get your scores up, I would consider UChicago. They have one of the top economics programs, and they like prep school kids. My son graduated from Lville, and in his graduating class they accepted ~15 students to UChicago. Even if your grades are not in top decile, you might stand a decent chance.

2 Likes

They strongly prefer ed1/ed2.

4 Likes

True. In my son’s graduating class, of the 15, only 2 were RD admits. Both of these were URM. So if you want to take a shot at Chicago, I’d go for ED1 or ED2.

2 Likes

For context, this is a recent college matriculation list for Lawrenceville:

1 Like

Deleted

1 Like

Wow. Crazy at some small colleges such a large # matriculated from one school. Thanks for sharing.

Edit. Reading it’s over five years. Makes more sense.

1 Like

I’d also normalize for the size of the destination college.

1 Like

Deleted

Can you all return focus to the OP, please. He has said he doesn’t attend Lville, so we don’t need posts analyzing their matriculations. I’m sure his college counseling office has its own list.

UChicago, regarding their location and core curriculum, is definitely a no for me.

3 Likes