Class of 2014: Waitlisted

<p>Wait list and yield information form the class of 2013:</p>

<p>Class</a> of 2013 Yield Falls Despite Huge Increase in Number of Applications - The Tech</p>

<p>So I haven't posted on this site in a while, but I saw this thread and felt compelled to reply.</p>

<p>I was one of those applicants that was accepted off the waitlist last year, to my total surprise. I had originally paid my deposit at UPenn and was all ready to go there. I had no thought in my mind that MIT would call anyone off the waitlist, let alone if it was me.</p>

<p>It may be really tough for all of you waitlistees right now, but my best advice is to hang on until April 1, and assess your options at that point. Trust me, you'll be so involved in deciding between your available options that all the stress you're feeling about the waitlist right now will completely be erased from your mind.</p>

<p>I hadn't checked the MIT Admissions Blog on the week of the waitlist decisions, so I was completely shocked when I checked my email while I was driving home one day. Needless to say (since this is the MIT forum), shortly thereafter, I accepted MIT's offer and withdrew from Penn's.</p>

<p>But I'd just like to emphasize that you all have accomplished something that many people would kill to have. Being waitlisted from MIT proves the strength of your application and your academic merit. Sit back and relax until April 1, and expect to hear a lot of good news. </p>

<p>If anyone has any questions (about MIT, the waitlist, or otherwise) feel free to ask.</p>

<p>@bmehopeful Thank you for your post!</p>

<p>anyone know where i can find my mit applicant ID #? I want to email the admissions office about some stuff but I don't know what my ID # is.</p>

<p>It should be fine if you list your name, your high school, and your birthdate.</p>

<p>K thanks a lot</p>

<p>
[quote]

Due to an increased number of applicants EVERYWHERE thanks to Common app, I guess almost everyone is expecting a higher yield.

[/quote]

Wait.. maybe I'm just being stupid here, but why would colleges expect higher yields when they have more applicants? Wouldn't this just mean that the applicants have more colleges to choose from, leading to lower yields?</p>

<p>^ yes</p>

<p>I guess I should be more precise: Yes, I'd think it would result it lower yields (so, no, I don't think you're being stupid)</p>

<p>@Hanflebears and @STMoore I agree,it would result in lower yields that is why the WL is larger, last year was around 500 this year is around 700. IF the yield is lower they will take people off the WL. WE HOPE! :)</p>

<p>MIt has a great fin. aid policy, it will have a high yield.</p>

<p>@DMOC We have a chance! Please see the article below
Information from last year's class. </p>

<p>Class of 2013 Yield Falls Despite Huge Increase in Number of Applications</p>

<p>"MIT’s yield fell for the class of 2013: 64 percent of students accepted MIT’s offer of admission, down from 66 percent for the class of 2012 and from a record high of 69 percent for the class of 2011."</p>

<p>Class</a> of 2013 Yield Falls Despite Huge Increase in Number of Applications - The Tech</p>

<p>Also take into account that MIT will be increasing our financial aid budget by 6.7% accompanied with an increase in tuition by 3% (although the increase in financial aid outpaces the increase in tuition, therefore actually making it MORE affordable to MORE people).</p>

<p><a href="http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/financial-aid.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/financial-aid.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>How many originally wait-listed students chose to get off the wait list for Class of 2013?</p>

<p>How large was the wait-list after the April "do you want to stay on the wait list?" (acc. to MIT website: 455) for Class of 2013?</p>

<p>How many students chose not to go to MIT Class of 2013?</p>

<p>How many students are in the Class of 2013?
Like, how much room is in this inelastic number that they choose will be the class size? </p>

<p>That way we can estimate how many they will take off the wait-list.</p>

<p>Also, keep in mind that many students will not elect to stay on the waitlist, i am sure many waitlisted will get into HYPS, be happy and too lazy to submit additional letters (as I would be) and decline their spot...that should whittle it down quite a bit</p>

<p>Feliz, YEAH!!! :) Man I am so hoping that HYPS accepts all the people who got in MIT. :)</p>

<p>Hi everyone! This is from Matt McGann, our Associate Director of Admissions: </p>

<p>
[quote]

I know that folks on the waitlist have lots of questions; hopefully this post will be helpful.
**
How does the waitlist work?
**
We are aiming for a class of about 1,075 students this year. Based on our estimates of the percentage of admitted students who will attend (known as the "yield"), we admitted 1611 students. However, it isn't possible to exactly predict how many student will attend this year. To help with the uncertainties, we also keep a waitlist of students.
**
Is the waitlist ranked?
**
No.
**
How many people are on the waitlist?
**
We offered 722 applicants -- approximately 4.3% of applicants -- a spot on the waitlist. Not all of those students will choose to remain on the waitlist.
**
Can you tell me where I am on the waitlist?
**
As I've said, the waitlist is not ranked. We will reconsider all of the waitlisted students again in May, when we know how many students remain on the waitlist, and how many we wish to take from the waitlist.
**
How many people will you admit from the waitlist this year?
**
It is impossible to know. We will have no idea how many people, if any, we will take from the waitlist until after the reply date of May 1.
**
What has the waitlist looked like, historically?
**
Last year we admitted 78 students from the waitlist. The year before that, we admitted 35 students from the waitlist, and the year before that we admitted 20 students. However, the four years before that, we didn't take anyone from the waitlist. But there was another year in this past decade where we admitted more than 100 students from the waitlist. So, it's hard to know how this year will look. Over the past few years, the "waitlist admit rate" has ranged from 0% to 18%.
**
What are the realities here?
**
I know that while we plan for the worst, usually things don't go quite so badly. Thus, it's likely that most people on the waitlist will not be admitted. I hope that you will have another great choice to fall in love with, so that no matter what happens with the MIT waitlist, everything will still turn out well for you in the end.
**
Who do you admit from the waitlist? For example, if someone from state X or major Y declines, are you likely to look for another student like them?
**
If we go to the waitlist, we will consider what our class looks like as one factor in choosing students. But we're not strict about it. So, if an oboe player decides to go somewhere else, we may, or may not, try to take another oboe player.
**
Are domestic students given priority over international students on the waitlist?
**
No, but we do consider whether admitting international students from the waitlist would put us over our 8% international quota.
**
I'm still very interested in attending MIT. What should I do if I hope to be admitted from the waitlist?
**
Certainly, you should return the postcard coming in the postal mail with your waitlist notification (decision letter). This letter was mailed yesterday. Additionally, I would recommend sending us a letter in mid-late April with an update on what you've been up to since our last contact. You can also feel free to provide any other information you think would be helpful.
**
What should I not do?
**
Here are some things you should not do: Fly to campus to make the case in person. Send us ridiculous items or bribes. Submit a whole new application. Bombard our office with way too much stuff. Be pushy. Be sketchy. Let your grades drop. Not choose another college to attend by May 1.
**
What should I do about the May 1 reply date for other colleges?
**
You should accept the offer of admission from another college before May 1, even if it means making a deposit. After May 1, when all students have sent their replies, colleges will determine if they need to go to their waitlist or not, and if so, how many students they need to admit. At this point, colleges will begin admitting students from the waitlist. Students who accept this offer will "unenroll" at the first college and enroll at the second. This shifting can lead to a second round of waitlist admissions. All of this is a standard part of the admissions process. We colleges recognize and accept this.
**
If I'm admitted off of the waitlist, do I have to go to MIT? What about financial aid?
**
You're not required to enroll. We'll give you a financial aid package and you'll have time to consider your decision before letting us know one way or the other. It is in your best interest to complete your financial aid application now, so that if you are admitted from the waitlist, we'll have a financial aid package ready to go. Our waitlist process, like our entire admissions process, is need blind, and we will meet full need for all admitted students.
**
Okay, what should I do now?
**
If you are still interested in MIT, you should stay in contact with us. A letter, a phone call, notes from people who know you well... these are good things to provide. Please always be very nice in all of your interactions with us! Keep us up to date all the way through May 1 and beyond if you remain interested.</p>

<p>And in the meantime... be patient. There won't be any waitlist news until after May 1.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>D got her WL card today. She will stay on the WL. Should she sent it certified mail?</p>

<p>
[quote]
That way we can estimate how many they will take off the wait-list.

[/quote]

It is absolutely impossible to estimate how many they will take off the wait-list.</p>

<p>MITChris: "A letter, a phone call, notes from people who know you well... these are good things to provide."</p>

<p>Does a letter from a teacher who already wrote a rec for the application help? My wait-listed S has begun an independent study of number theory for the 2nd semester at school with the Math teacher who wrote him a rec for his MIT EA app. I think she is able to provide information about my S's recent progress in Math.</p>