Correcting application errors after submission … or not

<p>I mistakenly put for one of my minor EC's that I participated for 20 hr/wk for 3 wks instead of 3 hrs/wk for 20 wks... Does anyone think I should contact the schools?</p>

<p>kgoodwin18--Rather than submitting these awards and events as application errors or omissions, simply send your colleges a resume that includes them. I'm a big fan of what I call the "annotated activities list." This is sort of like a resume on steroids ... i.e., it includes brief explanations (a sentence or so) of your various endeavors. You don't need to provide this sort of explanation for EVERY item on the list ... only for those that aren't self-explanatory or where you have put in atypical effort that might not be obvious from the listing alone. (This can also be a handy place to toss in a touch of humor here and there.) </p>

<p>The two book awards are impressive and colleges should see them. The "Junior Marshal" is a good example of an entry that requires a brief explanation because many admission folks won't know what you mean.</p>

<p>That's a good idea! Thanks Sally_Rubenstone. Just one more question: I actually think I have the organizations where I volunteered in the 9th and 10th grade. I just don't have the hours. Do you think this would be okay with colleges?</p>

<p>kgoodwin18--A ballpark estimate of the hours is all that colleges want. You should be able to remember if you volunteered a couple hours a week or a couple hours a month, etc. If your hours were variable, just average them out. </p>

<p>HatesScreenNames--If your "20-hour per week" activity took place during the school year, admission officials will probably figure out that you made a mistake. Unless this was a very recent activity or unless you find OTHER mistakes on your applications that should be corrected, too, you can let this one go.</p>

<p>Thank you, Sally! The activity was during the school year, and it was a peer tutoring group that I formed, so I thought they'd figure it out... But thanks, I was getting a little paranoid ;)</p>

<p>Would it be a good idea to send in this annotated resume along with my mid-year report to save postage money? Also (sorry for all the questions, but I promise this is the last one), in my middle school years, I was named a Duke TIP Scholar. However, upon entering high school, I've received no other information or news from this program. Could I still include it in my resume. </p>

<p>OH, just remembered something! I attended Notre Dame's Seminar for African-American Scholars and Windows on Williams, a program for Williams College. I'm applying to both of these schools, they probably have record of these programs. But to other schools, would these things matter? Both programs required an application, essays, test scores, etc. and were selective.</p>

<p>Would it be a good idea to send in this annotated resume along with my mid-year report to save postage money? Also (sorry for all the questions, but I promise this is the last one), in my middle school years, I was named a Duke TIP Scholar. However, upon entering high school, I've received no other information or news from this program. Could I still include it in my resume. </p>

<p>OH, just remembered something! I attended Notre Dame's Seminar for African-American Scholars and Windows on Williams, a program for Williams College. I'm applying to both of these schools, they probably have record of these programs. But to other schools, would these things matter? Both programs required an application, essays, test scores, etc. and were selective.</p>

<p>I talked about a school's international RELATIONS major when they only have an international STUDIES major. How big of a deal is that? Should I try to fix it?</p>

<p>^
I'd argue that that's basically the same thing and can be chalked up to a somewhat minor typo. I wouldn't bother correcting that. They'll know what you mean.</p>

<p>One of my Common App essay's sentences lacks a phrase. It reads something like: "No longer worried about mistakes, . I found that music, etc. etc."
It really disrupts the flow of the essay, and kind of leaves a bit of information out. Should I email the admissions with the corrected sentence?</p>

<p>For my common essay, I misspelled the word "available". I have no idea how. I've only sent applications out to a fraction of my colleges, so is it possible to fix this mistake for ones I haven't sent it to yet?</p>

<p>For my Yale supplement, I wrote "it's" instead of "its" twice. I can't get over it. I was doing all of my essays on Google Docs, and only after I saw them on Microsoft Word yesterday did I realize. My jaw dropped, I have no idea how I allowed such stupid mistakes to slip...</p>

<p>@kgoodwin18</p>

<p>
[quote]
Would it be a good idea to send in this annotated resume along with my mid-year report to save postage money?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yep</p>

<p>
[quote]
in my middle school years, I was named a Duke TIP Scholar. However, upon entering high school, I've received no other information or news from this program. Could I still include it in my resume.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Ordinarily I discourage using middle school endeavors in college resumes, but TIP is a well-respected program and your participation as a middle-schooler does show that you were qualified for--and interested in--this level of academic challenge at a early age. So go ahead and include it under a "Summer Activities" heading but don't devote a lot of space to it (i.e., no annotations ... admission folks will recognize it).</p>

<p>
[quote]
I attended Notre Dame's Seminar for African-American Scholars and Windows on Williams, a program for Williams College. I'm applying to both of these schools, they probably have record of these programs. But to other schools, would these things matter? Both programs required an application, essays, test scores, etc. and were selective.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>These programs are basically recruitment events for the sponsoring colleges. Even though OTHER colleges realize that you're applying elsewhere, there's no need to rub it in their faces. So I suggest that you customize your resume for Williams and ND. Include their programs on their respective resumes but don't share the info with other schools. (However, if you do end up sharing it, no biggie.)</p>

<p>
[quote]
I talked about a school's international RELATIONS major when they only have an international STUDIES major. How big of a deal is that? Should I try to fix it?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>xenophilia-I agree with RedSeven. In a perfect world you would have caught that small error before you sent the app, but it's no big deal, and to correct it at this point would probably just make you look a bit obsessive. Keep in mind also that, at most colleges, half the admission staff won't know the official name of the program either. ;)</p>

<p>valoriane--Here are instructions on making changes to the Common App after you've already submitted it.</p>

<p>From the Common App instructions:</p>

<p>
[quote]
Application Versions</p>

<p>The Common Application should generally be completed once, with identical copies sent to all colleges. You should create a new version if you wish to correct an error discovered after submission or provide new information not available when you first submitted the application. It is not necessary to "customize" your Common Application for individual colleges. Individual college supplements and supplemental essay questions should be used to provide special information to different colleges. Below are the steps necessary to create an alternate version.</p>

<p>Step1: You must submit the Common Application to at least one institution first. You cannot create an alternate version until this has occurred.</p>

<p>Step 2: You must log out of the application then go to this special URL:
<a href="https://www.commonapp.org/CommonApp/Default.aspx?allowcopy=true%5B/url%5D"&gt;https://www.commonapp.org/CommonApp/Default.aspx?allowcopy=true&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>and login using your existing User Name and Password.</p>

<p>Step 3: Upon login you will be taken to the 'Common Application' page, where you will see information about the application you have already submitted. The ability to create an alternate version of your submitted Common Application is now activated, and you should click on the ‘Replicate’ link to make an alternate version of your submitted application. When this is complete, a second version will be visible on your screen and a special drop down list will appear in the upper right corner of your application. You can use this drop down to move between application versions.</p>

<p>All data from your original version of your Common Application will be transferred to your alternate version, with the exception of any documents that you uploaded. You may edit any of this information before you submit it to another institution.</p>

<p>You only need to go to the special URL the first time you create an alternative version. Thereafter, additional application versions can be made by going to the ‘Common Application’ section within your original Common Application and using the ‘Replicate’ link. You may make up to 10 versions, including the original version. You only need your original User Name and Password to access all versions.</p>

<p>When you create the first alternate version of your application you will see a simple confirmation message. If you create any additional alternate versions of your application you will need to complete two affirmation statements then click the 'OK' button. You may also click the 'Cancel' button to not create the new alternate version.</p>

<p>You will have a separate My Colleges page for each application version. Each institution can only be on the My Colleges list of one application version, and you can have a total of 20 institutions across all versions.</p>

<p>You can move an institution from one version to a different version at any time prior to submitting the Common App to that institution by selecting the college on the My Colleges page and clicking on the "Move College" button.

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</p>

<p>Depending on exactly where in your app you misspelled "available," a new version may not be worth the hassle.</p>

<p>Re your Yale snafu ... not ideal but not a deal-breaker either. Don't worry about it.</p>

<p>smashedpumpkin65--</p>

<p>I don't see enough of the essay here to evaluate the extent of your error. Maybe you can add more, or perhaps another CC member gets what you're saying and can advise.</p>

<p>Hi! I've filled 2 fields wrong in my application.
1. In the 'Earnings towards' blank, I filled in 'towards coll fees, coll fund, and so on'.
2. In the Awards section, I meant to write that I was the editor of my school and college English paper, but the description just reads 'Editor - sasad'.</p>

<p>These were the last 2 changes to my application and I'm guessing they weren't saved, I don't know why.
Is it worth sending a message to the Admissions Counsellor asking him to please change these fields? Or will he just be peeved?</p>

<p>My disastrous app mistakes that may(/will) destroy all my chances:</p>

<ol>
<li><p>My common app short answer got cut off....in the end it is like: ....also in our abil (instead of also in our ability to help). I tired to edit the last line minuted before the deadline, and I got no error message from common app when i pressed save.</p></li>
<li><p>I have a " had began" in the same answer.</p></li>
<li><p>I miss a "the" in my common app essay, and a "in". They are just gone..</p></li>
<li><p>In my Princeton supplement, which is something I was very proud of, I have "year" instead of "ear".</p></li>
</ol>

<p>Have I royally screwed my chances? I am the worst proofreader in the world. ever. Period. </p>

<p>I contacted 3 colleges about the common app missing words. One replied saying that I can submit a revised version. Others did not reply.</p>

<p>Sally_Rubenstone: Woah. Thank you soo much. I just did this, it worked and I'm really grateful. Cheers!</p>

<p>You're welcome, valoriane. I'm glad this worked out for you.</p>

<p>To everyone else ... yesterday I spoke with a friend of mine who is a Smith College admission officer. I asked her what she thinks about application corrections. Her response was what I expected: She only wants to see them if the changes are EGREGIOUS. The example she gave was, "If a student volunteered for 200 hours and, after sending the application, noticed that it said 2 hours (or vice versa), then it's worth a note to admission offices." But in most cases, she insisted, it's a pain to have to deal with post-submission corrections, especially for mistakes such as spelling. She also echoed my earlier advice which was NEVER send corrections more than once. If you do have some changes to submit, be sure to compile them in one email only.</p>

<p>However, one common snafu I've seen that does cry out for correction is when the end of an essay gets cut off. (Students haven't properly previewed the app before sending or they may be unclear about how to tell when an essay is inadvertently truncated.) So my advice is that, if you do find that the version of the essay that colleges received is missing a couple final sentences (or even final words), then you should send a complete version of the essay to all your colleges with an explanatory note asking them to disregard the original essay and to use the new one.</p>

<p>But, again, this is NOT something you should do if you catch a few typos or spelling errors. Only take this approach if some critical section of the essay was not properly transmitted.</p>

<p>I accidentally self- reported on my application a higher SAT subject test score, by a 10 point margin to Yale. Should I just rely on the fact that I sent my (correct) scores via college board and not give a short e-mail to them, explaining the "typo"? Thank you.</p>