Dartmouth-the "is that really" an ivy league school

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<p>I think that was the point - that far away from the northeast many people cannot distinguish between Penn and Penn State and mostly have never heard of Penn.</p>

<p>But why is this main question on this thread even asked? If you are choosing Dartmouth in order to wear the Ivy label you are picking it for the wrong reason.</p>

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across the country, Dartmouth is known by those who are hiring in most industries - especially finance, sci, and tech.

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<p>I would suggest that Tuck is well known by those hiring in finance/business, just as Wharton is well known. Not (half?) as many actually know the parent school, however - nor even care. But Dartmouth in science, tech? Huh? (Easily beat out by top publics and even Cornell.)</p>

<p>But when you graduate you realize 99% of the people you run into know it. I honestly almost never run into someone who hasn't heard of Dartmouth. I'm actually surprised by the number of people that do.</p>

<p>^Nah, its just exaggerated here on CC. I bet a lot of people know about Dartmouth easily.</p>

<p>And contrary to other random CC beliefs, a lot of people DO know the difference between Penn State and UPenn.
People DO know that Brown isn't just a color, but an amazing Ivy League university.</p>

<p>Everyone needs to calm down here. MOST, yes MOST, high school students will have no idea that Dartmouth, as well as Brown and UPenn and maybe Cornell (except here in NY), are Ivy League schools. We are talking about most kids, meaning average and below average academically. HYP are the ones that the not-so-smart kids know about</p>

<p>-- most people on this forum are most likely surrounded by, or are friends with, kids who are above average intellectually, top of the class, etc. Take this from me, I have maybe 3 friends tops who care about school work -_-</p>

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<p>Here in CA a lot of people do but a lot of people don't as well. I'm not sure which is in the majority. And I mean man-on-the-street, not CC members or people in academia. Heck, here a lot people think you are talking about Cal Poly Pomona when you mention Pomona College, and those are both CA schools. A couple of colleges 2500 miles away in PA are that much more likely to be confused.</p>

<p>Lol, I get a lot of both.</p>

<p>"What is Dart-mouth?"</p>

<p>"Wow, you go to Dartmouth!"</p>

<p>I feel like of the Ivies, Dartmouth and Penn definitely are among the least known, but it definitely depends on the crowd. At a dinner table with blue collar workers from the midwest or west coast? Probably not many people would know what Dartmouth is, but know about HYP.</p>

<p>Dinner with white collar Wall Street execs or high government officials? I think most people would know.</p>

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<p>Don't you hate it when they act like you're their friend, but then they talk about you behind your back?</p>

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<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/1064580954-post73.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/1064580954-post73.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

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I feel like of the Ivies, Dartmouth and Penn definitely are among the least known, but it definitely depends on the crowd. At a dinner table with blue collar workers from the midwest or west coast? Probably not many people would know what Dartmouth is, but know about HYP.</p>

<p>Dinner with white collar Wall Street execs or high government officials? I think most people would know.

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<p>This. (10 char.)</p>

<p>Here we go again. Much ado about what started solely as an athletic league of 8 schools. If you look at peer assessment (i.e. rankings by leadership in other colleges and universities), the top tiers (+or- 2 points in the scoring) include:
I HYP, MIT Stanford
II Swarthmore, Williams, Amherst, Cal Tech, U Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Penn
III Dartmouth, Brown, et al,</p>

<p>and so on and so forth. All are great schools, all are in the uppermost stratum of reputation among those who know. The same candidate matriculating at any of these colleges will accomplish their life goals (at least in terms of graduate study and career) equally well, assuming no weird mismatch that affects his/her happiness/productivity at said schools.</p>

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It's actually a fair question. On the west coast, few have ever heard of Dartmouth, but that goes for every NE LAC as well. Penn is known as the school with the great football team coached by JoePa (Wharton is its own school, no?). Outside of HYP, Cornell is probably the best known Ivy on the left coast....likely due to its strong sciences (and larger alumni presence).

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<p>This has been my experience too. In CA, people in general will obviously know about Harvard (which will register in their minds as being as good as Stanford, UCLA, and Berkeley...not the other way around) and <em>probably</em> Yale and Princeton too. If they're smart, then Cornell and Columbia, because they're pretty big-sized schools with big names. They won't know that UPenn is an Ivy League school, but at least it'll sound like a real university to them. Dartmouth and Brown, on the other hand...I've had people (yes, plural) seriously ask me if Dartmouth was a 2-year or vocational. What a slap in the face.</p>

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<p>No, the Ivy League did not start as an athletic league of 8 schools. And it has NEVER been solely an athletic league. It is also used to refer to the educational traditions, method, and philosophy of the nation's oldest schools. </p>

<p>It started as an informal collection of old, prestigious, and academically rigorous schools in the northeast that eventually formalized their relationship and rivalries into an athletic league. The term "Ivy League" was in commonly used to refer to these schools for at least 20 years prior to the establishment of the athletic league.</p>

<p>I knew Dartmouth was an Ivy since the day I found out the Ivy League consisted of eight schools in New England.
Or maybe even before that, seeing as I'd read about Dartmouth in Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld.</p>

<p>^^Actually, only 5 of the 8 Ivy schools are located in New England. Cornell and Columbia are both in New York and Princeton is in New Jersey.</p>

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Or maybe even before that, seeing as I'd read about Dartmouth in Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld.

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<p>that's how I knew about top schools when I was younger haha. Lee wanted to apply to Brown and Tufts to be near the guy she liked. Oh memories...</p>

<p>since we're correcting people... only four of them are in new england...</p>

<p>Mid-Atlantic:
Cornell & Columbia (NY)
Princeton (NJ)
University of Pennsylvania (PA) </p>

<p>New England:
Dartmouth (NH)
Harvard (MA)
Yale (CT)
Brown (RI)</p>

<p>^^You're right. Penn slipped my mind.</p>