Do Employers Use Affirmative Action?

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Well my schools engineering program seems to have a lot of extra benefits for females and URMs if they apply and then get in.

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A lot of that is privately funded or organized, and that is perfectly acceptable. If someone wants to start a scholarship or support group, they are allowed to do so, and very few feel the need to create scholarships or support groups targeting the overwhelmingly largest demographic in engineering!</p>

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Its like my school would rather have 20 more unqualified URMs then qualified nonURMs

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Remember that your school is also trying to woo customers/students, and their research indicates that diversity is important to the majority of those customers/students.</p>

<p>I have never seen a problem hiring white males in engineering jobs. Indeed, finding anything BUT a white male can be a real challenge. Personally, I find that dissappointing, as my experience with minority engineers has been overwhelmingly positive. All of them seemed well-qualified, and often had subtly different ways of approaching a problem that helped the team.</p>

<p>Hispanic engineering student here...
Trust me, there are lots of URMs that want to be engineers at my school. But by the time they see an integral they pass out and sign up for Art History major. It's sad. Many of them have gotten scholarships.
A good handful graduate too but their scores and extra curriculum is so low, they don't work into their field.
Because I'm a lower division student, I couldn't qualify for any scholarships by my school. I'll try again this year...</p>

<p>Well thats what I'm saying. They have all the opportunity in the world to major in engineering if they want but they choose not to (for w/e reason, no interest, can't do it, etc.) but there is still a drive to get more. I don't get what else you can do before you start taking unqualified students.</p>

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<p>That is not necessarily true in some fields and some regions.</p>

<p>OP, have you seen the race FAQ? I know it is primarily about college admission, but there is some useful info, for example about why the info is collected, and declining to state there. </p>

<p>Also, I know this is a bit off topic, but whenever someone mentions all the scholarships for URM's, I want to compile them. So far I don't have much. For those of you frustrated with scholarships that exclude you, but not an otherwise identical URM point me in that direction? And not a google search; those have yielded very little once you drill down.</p>

<p>Shrinkrap- are you talking about individual colleges, or the scholarships that are independent of the colleges? Most all colleges have at least one scholarship for URM's, and most have multiple. </p>

<p>If you are talking about scholarships indepdendent of the college, there are a number of those too.</p>

<p>Or when you apply for a scholarship or internship or something and at the end it specifically says it "encourages" females and URMs to apply or something. Easy to take the hint.</p>

<p>"are you talking about individual colleges, or the scholarships that are independent of the colleges? Most all colleges have at least one scholarship for URM's, and most have multiple."</p>

<p>Neither of my kids schools, and none of the thirty or so that they applied to, had scholarships limited to african americans of average for the school ability and income.</p>

<p>"If you are talking about scholarships indepdendent of the college, there are a number of those too. "</p>

<p>If course I READ this a lot, but few people actually come up with links, which would allow me to figure out what I and other URM's might be missing. Maybe this is an outreach issue. Non-URM's are being taunted with these scholarships, and URM's (some of us at least) somehow aren't aware of them. For example, someone once came up with a link for a specific school for URM's at the grad school level for engineering. Good to know!</p>

<p>Edit; I may not be remembering my D's experience perfectly as it was four years ago, but she did not get any diversity scholarships that I can recall. She got some merit scholarships, generally around 5k for a 55k school, and for the most part similar stats seemed to get similar offers. If most were diversity scholarships, they did not mention it.
One exception at D's school I can recall, but certainly not for URM's of average ability (and income) for the school.</p>

<p>it "encourages" females and URMs to apply or something. Easy to take the hint. "</p>

<p>Sorry to be so dense; what is it hinting at? That the scholarship is limited to women and URM's and others need not apply? I've looked at a few of those, and the results do not suggest that is true.</p>

<p>There do seem to be more "incentives" for URM's who are ALSO poor, and this might not be "fair" either, but the amount rarely seems to make a difference in ability to attend.</p>

<p>DeadSupra, do you mind saying what school? Is it a CCC? Were these scholarships merit scholarships limited to URM's, or based on need?</p>

<p>"They have all the opportunity in the world ..."</p>

<p>Seriously?</p>

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Or when you apply for a scholarship or internship or something and at the end it specifically says it "encourages" females and URMs to apply or something. Easy to take the hint.

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<p>I managed to be selected as an alternate for the SMART fellowship as a white male even though it's very strongly aimed at women and minorities (it was very explicitly stated on the website back when I did the applications, too).</p>

<p>So by explicitly you mean, the website said only woman and minorities are eligible? And you applied anyway? Good for you! Half of the pictures on the site right now are white males!</p>

<p>It said the fellowship was aimed at women and minorities and there were essays about how getting this fellowship would help increase diversity in STEM fields.</p>

<p>Ah! I see. Interesting. If we are talking about the same scholarship, it doesn't even IMPLY that now!</p>

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<p>A white male would probably increase the diversity in engineering at some schools in California.</p>

<p>This is a quote from a Google engineering program you can apply for</p>

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The program is open to all qualified college students, and is committed to addressing diversity in our company and in the technology industry. Students who are a member of a group that is historically under-represented in the technology industry are encouraged to apply, including Women, Native-American, African-American, Hispanic, and students with disabilities.

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<p>This is what I meant by "encouraged" to apply. </p>

<p>Here is a quote from the SWE Scholarship site</p>

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The SWE Scholarship Program provides financial assistance to women admitted to accredited baccalaureate or graduate programs, in preparation for careers in engineering, engineering technology and computer science

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<p>AISES</p>

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The A.T. Anderson Memorial Sholarship program was established by AISES in 1983 in memory of A.T. Anderson (Mohawk), a chemical engineer and an AISES founder. Annual scholarships are awarded to members of AISES who are American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) college students pursuing academic degrees in the sciences, engineering, medicine, natural resources, and math.

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<p>There are a lot of scholarships like this, idk where you were looking</p>

<p>but the point of this thread was answered awhile ago. I'll just keep saying I am a white male</p>

<p>Would anybody like to hear from a female engineer from the 80's? I remember a Fall when my school recruited women like crazy and actually had a 50% female freshman class. By the following year we were back to normal (20-25% women on campus) Currently, same school, 25% female. I hope by now they just consider it their norm.</p>

<p>As far as those little boxes at the end of the job ap. The manager isn't even supposed to see them. That is only for HR metrics. And the EEOC will review those metrics if necessary. If they see the company consistently gets resumes from 25% female and 10% URM but has never hired a single one that would be a red flag. Also if they never get any resumes from an URM's then the hiring manager is no longer under investigation, but HR would be questioned as to what they are doing to bring in a broader pool. That is part of HR's job which is why there are special magazines and job boards for URM's. But HR never gets the final say in hiring.</p>

<p>MomfromKC, thank you for adding some reason and facts to this ranting and raving thread.</p>

<p>Thanks PurpleDuckMan.</p>

<p>So for my list, I will add that "The Society of Women Engineers", and "The American Indian Science and Engineering Society" have scholarships for women and American Indians respectively. </p>

<p>"idk where you were looking"</p>

<p>I wasn't exactly "looking", but my kids have primarily applied to schools in the west, and a few in the south. And since some say "Most all colleges have at least one scholarship for URM's, and most have multiple" and "If you are talking about scholarships independent of the college, there are a number of those too", I thought I would have happened upon some by now. Most of what I have seen is need and/or based, and rarely if ever, explicitly excludes white males. I now have at least two references for scholarships independent of a college.</p>

<p>As Shrinkrap said, most scholarships are need based and not minority based at my school at least. Well not most, all. 9 times out of 10 it is a minority that qualifies for this. </p>

<p>Majority of minority scholarships are funded by sources outside the college. Alumni, organizations, businesses. To say schools are giving minorities money for being a minority isn't completely accurate. I am a minority and I don't qualify for most minority scholarships because my parents are middle class and/or I don't go to a HBCU.</p>

<p>On the flip side, if a white male wanted to go to a HBCU he would qualify for a minority scholarship through the school. Just not a path a lot of white males take.</p>