Fundraising

<p>My intent IS to raise funds for the Cancer Society. I don't give a crap if my community knows who i am. I just said that about my peers because they are not exactly the trustworthy people you can come across to help with the intent. You have not visited my school to be saying what you did.
And ok, my community is pretty active relatively. I take back what i said about that. I don't if this is coming out right but my ulterior motive is DEFINITELY NOT TO MAKE MYSELF LOOK GOOD. I dont care about that. So, please don't infer that from such scanty info that i provided.</p>

<p>However, this is not to mean that EVERY peer in my high school is like that. We do have a bunch of caring people in our school. Im saying, though, that we have MORE uncaring people than caring people so one would get tthe impression that our school OVERALL sucks. Also, with adults, its easier to get sponsored no?</p>

<p>bump. could some1 answer my questions in post #16?</p>

<p>
[quote]
1) Do you think i should tell my plans to my principal and if he agrees, then he can have the entire school represent me? I can also get my interact club to help me out. I can get them to represent me. Which is a better idea?

[/quote]

Your principal can only give you permission to do this. It will be up to the other people in the school (students and adults alike) to give their time and resources to it. Note: What's in it for them? You've got to create something that makes your volunteers want to give. </p>

<p>Also, don't be surprised if the principal says you need to get approval from the town school committee or school board of ed.</p>

<p>
[quote]
2) I didn't know i needed insurance. How would i get the participants insured?

[/quote]

Talk to various insurance companies. Talk to folks who have organized events in the past.
By the way, who will be putting their signature on all the legal documents? </p>

<p>
[quote]
3) I didn't even know we had a chamber of commerce. (if you want to know where i live, PM me)

[/quote]

Whether you do a golf tournament or 5K road race/run, you have a lot of legwork ahead of you. We have a town 3K/5K road race ever year (a fund raiser) and it takes a large team to organize (police & fire details, fund raising, registration process, credit card system setup to collect registration fees/donations, road closures, EMT coverage, beverages, recognition ceremony at the end, PA system w/speakers, electricity,...). </p>

<p>Don't assume if you build it, they will come. It takes lots of labor intensive promotions on many fronts to get runners to sign up. You'll need a certain number of runners just to cover the cost of the event.</p>

<p>
[quote]
4) Im going to a kick off breakfast for the American Cancer Society on the 12th of August. What should i do to maximize my chances of taking advantage of the breakfast in regards to my project?
Should i ask for an opportunity to announce my plans and see if adults are willing to help me out?

[/quote]

The ACS has large fund raising departments. Ask them for ideas.</p>

<p>Do you have the money to pay all the up-front costs until the registration fees come in?</p>

<p>Shouldnt the mere fact of help to raise money for cancer be enough motivation?
Ok, if the principal says, that i will certainly announce it to the board of ed.</p>

<p>By the way, who will be putting their signature on all the legal documents?</p>

<p>I will be turning 18 in September.</p>

<p>And thanks for the rest of the answers. I realize that i have alot to do but i will definitely try to get the help of past organizers to help on this tournament.</p>

<p>Do you have the money to pay all the up-front costs until the registration fees come in? </p>

<p>no i don't have that kind of money. Thats why i said that i would try to get my school to represent me to have a better chance of getting sponsored.</p>

<p>And thanks for the reply!
Ill let you know how i am doing in the next couple weeks to come.</p>

<p>"Hmm, I don't know about doing a golf tournament, but hosting a 5k/10k race doesn't take that much. Well, that's coming from someone that has been trying to get a race to work since March, but the actual preparation doesn't take that much time. "</p>

<h2>Doing a 5k, 10k race takes a lot of time. You've already been working on it since March. I was with an organization that wanted to do such a race last year for a good cause, and ended up not doing it because the paperwork -- including obtaining insurance and liability forms -- was far more than people expected. </h2>

<p>Someone (can't remember who) who posted thought that publicizing things is easy: That you just have to put up posters and flyers. First, those materials have to be attractively designed (the better the design, the more people will notice them, so unless you're a highly skilled graphic artist, better to get a very experienced person to do this, preferably someone who works professionally at this), carefully proofread and purchased. The information also has to be posted at least 2 weeks in advance of the event. </p>

<p>Second, PR is far more than putting up flyers, which in itself is a lot of work. Putting up flyers may work when one is doing something for your school or church, but community-wide events require more publicity: public service announcements on radio and TV, info in newspaper and on-line calendars; and lots of word of mouth. Press releases and public service announcements need to be written and in some cases video or audio recorded. You need to make extensive use of social media. Get on local talk shows. All of this must be arranged at least 2 weeks before the event.</p>

<p>For things like tournaments, races -- participants usually expect something like a T-shirt or hat, and those need to be designed and ordered and purchased well before the event. That in itself takes more time and research than you could imagine: What company to get, what colors to use, what fibers to use, what sizes to use, how to pay for the items....</p>

<p>It's not just a matter of build it and people will come. These are not projects that one attempts to do by oneself. One needs a team of responsible, respected people, preferably some who some experience in doing this. That's why these are fulltime jobs for some people (such as events planners and marketing experts).</p>

<p>I thought you'd be interested in knowing how much work a small fundraiser takes. I wanted to raise money at my Buddhist center to help Haiti hurricane victims. Steps in doing this:</p>

<ol>
<li><p>Located a legitimate, reputable organization to receive the funds. From a friend who had done a fundraiser for Haiti, I learned that the Red Cross was a good organization. I talked to the Red Cross representative and asked if the Red Cross would be willing to come and accept the funds in person or to act as co-sponsor. They said they only sponsor their own fundraisers (there was an indication that they do this to avoid being caught up in scams), but would be glad to receive the funds.</p></li>
<li><p>Asked the Buddhist center board if I could use the center to raise funds for Haiti. I sent a written proposal with information about how the project would be done (during the center's open house, which is a part of a neighborhood openhouse. We would provide free food for visitors, and would offer visitors a chance to donate money for Haiti. We also would have musicians play.), and where the money would go. I am very involved with the local Buddhist center, and have done other projects there, so they know me well, and approved the project without question. This would not have occurred, however, if I hadn't had a long reputation of volunteering at the center.</p></li>
<li><p>Talked in person with and e-mailed several musicians affiliated with the center to ask if they'd help. They know me well, and agreed to play music during the open house.</p></li>
<li><p>Talked in person with and e-mailed all members of the center, explaining the project and asking them to donate food and drinks for visitors. </p></li>
<li><p>Asked a variety of people to help during the event including by greeting visitors and by keeping watch over the $ -- something is vital. It's best to have 2 responsible people watching the money at all times because charities have lost money due to volunteers -- even established members of organizations -- stealing it.</p></li>
<li><p>Creating flyers and posting them at the center a week in advance.</p></li>
<li><p>Creating a display board with information about Haiti, the hurricane, and how the Red Cross uses the money donated to that cause. I had gathered the materials for this well in advance, and thought that I was planning well ahead to start creating it about 8 hours before the event was to start. Creating it took far longer than I had expected. Fortuitiously, an artist friend stopped by and finished it for me. </p></li>
<li><p>Getting to the location early to make sure it was clean and to set it up.</p></li>
<li><p>During the event, I spent a lot of time making sure visitors were greeted, food was displayed attractively and with utensils, etc.</p></li>
<li><p>After the event, I helped with the clean-up and counting the money, and also was the person responsible for sending the $ to the Red Cross, and giving the center's board a receipt.</p></li>
<li><p>I also sent follow-up thank-you e-mails to everyone on the center's listserv and Facebook letting them know how much was raised. We raised about $140.</p></li>
</ol>

<p>This project still was very time consuming even though it didn't require things like press releases, insurance, liability forms, T-shirts, renting a space, prizes, judges, contingency plans for inclement weather, etc. Even doing this kind of project would be a very challenging one for a high school student, but it is the type of project a student could institute with their NHS, church group, etc.</p>

<p>N.B. I was able to get so much help because I was well known to everyone involved. People don't agree in general to projects done by strangers or people who are not friends of friends and who have no track record of doing projects. Lots of people have great-sounding ideas, but most people lack the organizational skills to do them, and many people with great ideas are scam artists.</p>

<p>Consequently, it's far easier and better to do fund raising projects as part of a team, not on your own. I highly doubt that you're the only person at your school who cares about raising funds for charity. You need to connect with others -- responsible, students and a responsible adult who'd serve as an advisor -- and you need to have a realistic fundraising idea (the golf tournament is, as I mentioned, a job for a full time professional events project) to have a successful fundraiser.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Shouldnt the mere fact of help to raise money for cancer be enough motivation?

[/quote]

If it were that easy, there would be lots more fundraisers. It will take lots of time from lots of people to get enough runners to pay your costs and make some money for ACS.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Ok, if the principal says, that i will certainly announce it to the board of ed.

[/quote]

Sounds like you don't understand it. The principal has no authority to simply endorse this and just announce it to the board of ed. I'm certain the board of ed will need to hear your presentation, and to ask questions to understand their liability. They will ask lots of questions. If you don't want to be bumped to subsequent board of ed meetings, you'd better have done exhaustive homework to be able to answer the questions they will ask. I've seen causes like this get shot down from a board of ed because they couldn't get all the answers to their questions.</p>

<p>
[quote]
> By the way, who will be putting their signature on all the legal documents?
I will be turning 18 in September.

[/quote]

OK. That sounds acceptable to you, but you need to find out if your signature will be acceptable to those whose documents you'll be signing. I don't know the answer but I know several vendors who wouldn't be comfortable with doing business with an 18yr old HS student with no deep pockets. When you put your signature on something, it's their right to want to know that there's something there they can go after if the deal breaks down. One more task for you to chase down ahead of time.</p>

<p>
[quote]
> Do you have the money to pay all the up-front costs until the registration fees come in?
no i don't have that kind of money. Thats why i said that i would try to get my school to represent me to have a better chance of getting sponsored.

[/quote]

Don't expect the school to lend you seed money. That's not what town school funds are allocated for.</p>

<p>^^^
My mistake when I wrote:</p>

<br>


<br>

<p>I can see now that's not what you intended. Sorry for the confusion.</p>

<p>") Im going to a kick off breakfast for the American Cancer Society on the 12th of August. What should i do to maximize my chances of taking advantage of the breakfast in regards to my project?
Should i ask for an opportunity to announce my plans and see if adults are willing to help me out?"</p>

<p>Have you ever been involved with the American Cancer Society before? Have you helped with any of their fundraisers.</p>

<p>Organizations like that are approached by many people -- including scam artists and well-meaning incompetents -- who want to raise money to help them. Organizations like American Cancer Society, however, have well established ways of raising funds by using their board members, paid staff, and volunteers.</p>

<p>They tend not to lend their paid staff, board members, volunteers to help with projects done by someone with no experience. For the hours (and fundraising takes a lot of hours) that their staff and volunteers put into such projects, the return may be very little.</p>

<p>If you haven't ever been involved with ACS or their fundraising, it would be wise now to start from the bottom, by getting involved with the projects they're already doing, and then learning how to do such projects from the bottom up. That's typically the way that people learn to do the kind of major projects you're describing. </p>

<p>If you haven't been involved in a major way in fundraising, it will sound arrogant and naive to ask the ACS to lend their support and resources to the project you're proposing.</p>

<p>In addition, netting $1,000 after all the work that a golf tournament would require, is a small return for a very big investment of time and resources.</p>

<p>" Do you think i should tell my plans to my principal and if he agrees, then he can have the entire school represent me? I can also get my interact club to help me out. I can get them to represent me. Which is a better idea?"</p>

<p>Take the "me" out of the project. If you approach the school, it should be to have the school sponsor the project as a school-wide effort. You'll have a better chance of being successful if you convince some advisors and students in your school's organizations to become involved, and then all of you approach the principal together. </p>

<p>I know someone who in high school got all schools in our district to raise the funds for and build a Habitat for Humanity house. This was not "his" project. It was "our" project. He was able to get people involved because he was well respected in his school, and had a high student government position as well as being on the local countywide student council. He also had extensive volunteer experience.</p>

<p>He made the project about his school and the school districts' making a difference, not him making a difference.</p>

<p>okay sorry for putting the "me". I didn't mean it like that. You guys are really picky with the words. I was just talking informally.</p>

<p>Believe it or not, potential sponsors will be even pickier than we are. When people's money or reputation is involved, people will become picky about things that will surprise you.</p>

<p>N.B. I was able to get so much help because I was well known to everyone involved. People don't agree in general to projects done by strangers or people who are not friends of friends and who have no track record of doing projects. Lots of people have great-sounding ideas, but most people lack the organizational skills to do them, and many people with great ideas are scam artists.</p>

<p>im well known in my school and people do like me. So forming a team shouldn't be THAAT hard. I can also ask my interact club advisor. There's no way she can say no. I've done alot of volunteering stuff for her, which doesn't necessarily mean that she will say yes but it's worth a shot. I guess we'll have to wait for school to start. I know im beginning to seem like a noob in front of all you experienced people, but i am really motivated to do this. It's not the motivation only, i get that. But I am willing to try.</p>

<p>Can I ask previous event organizers in my region for their help as well?
Do you think they would agree?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Can I ask previous event organizers in my region for their help as well?
Do you think they would agree?

[/quote]

This is where your legwork begins. </p>

<p>Setup time to meet with a variety of them. Let them know your plans. Ask them what they would be looking for if they were to support you. Since they've done this before, ask them to tell you, in their words, what they think you're up against, and if your plans are realistic. </p>

<p>It's clear you have lots of time consuming homework to do before you can stand and announce to your community that you will organize your given fund raiser.</p>

<p>You haven't said what your college plans are, but fall of senior year is often extremely busy with college visits, applications, SATs, striving to get/keep those grades up, sports, etc. Will you have time for this?</p>

<p>Fund-raising efforts, like the ones you've mentioned, are easily filled with pitfalls, regardless of how likable and well known you are. The replies you're getting here are not trying to kill your motivation. Rather, they are trying to keep you from hurting yourself. You have lots of homework to do before you can commit to anything. These things often take many months to prepare. Start now and by the time school starts, you should have a sense of whether you want to go public with your plans.</p>

<p>A very important question: Have you ever been involved in any way before with fundraising or community service? If you have, what exactly have you done with those things?</p>

<p>^Yes I've done a ton of volunteering. In regards to your second question, do you mean how i have taken the volunteering to another level?
If so, I haven't</p>

<p>I've attended events (hand-in hand for the mentally ill), dances for hand-in-hand, done community service river clean up projects twice, volunteered at library for a whole summer, was a camp counselor for a religious camp in pennsylvania. I've also attended a halloween event where we dress up and scare little kids (for two years), as volunteering, to give them a good time. I've never arranged any of these events, however.
I've started a debate club last year and this coming school year, I will start a fundraiser to raise money for the new club so we can take the club to the next level--local, county and statewide competitions. I will start a movie ticket fundraiser and get everybody in the club to be involved.</p>

<p>It's wonderful that you have previous volunteer experience. Still, since you've never organized a fundraiser before, it would be more feasible to start with a less ambitious project.</p>

<p>In addition, to be successful, the project you've proposed will need to take up the majority of your free time. You won't have time to be involved in other activities. As I mentioned before, paid full time employees typically organize (with lots of volunteer and staff help) the kind of project you're proposing.</p>

<p>Even the fundraiser and organizing your planning to do with your new debate club will be very time consuming. Of course, college apps and other important things you'll need to do senior year also will be time consuming.</p>