Is Lacrosse one of College's major sports?

<ol>
<li>Syracuse 5,832 </li>
<li>Ohio State 5,762 </li>
<li>Navy 5,263 </li>
</ol>

<p>given Navy's school size compared to Syracuse and Ohio State, that is pretty impressive</p>

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[quote]
given Navy's school size compared to Syracuse and Ohio State, that is pretty impressive

[/quote]
</p>

<p>True, but unlike OSU and Syracuse, Navy has the power to mandate attendance for its students. :p</p>

<p>a little surprised at the low average attendance for football games for Divisions other than IA:</p>

<p><a href="http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/Attendance/2009.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/Attendance/2009.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Div. IA - 46,281
Div. IAA - 8,654
Div. II - 3,539
Div. III - 1,841</p>

<p>Cuse, so that is it?</p>

<p>only football and basketbal, out of about 30 sports, would be considered "major sports" in colleges?</p>

<p>How about baseball, track & field, hockey and soccer?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Lacrosse is a great sport and is very exciting to watch, but it is not a major college sport. Who knows what the future may hold, but as of right now only football and basketball deserve to be characterized as "major" college sports.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>"a little surprised at the low average attendance for football games for Divisions other than IA:</p>

<p><a href="http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats...dance/2009.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats...dance/2009.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Div. IA - 46,281
Div. IAA - 8,654
Div. II - 3,539
Div. III - 1,841"</p>

<p>I would venture to guess that the average football attendance at the non Div1A schools still triples that of lacrosse at the same schools, if they even keep the attendance figures of lacrosse games (which are usually free except for the most diehard lacrosse schools).</p>

<p>this might be final four attendance, but I don't know what they use for football</p>

<p>NCAA</a> Men's College World Series 2010 - College World Series Attendance Records</p>

<p>2006-07 NCAA DIVISION I CHAMPIONSHIPS
Top 10 Total Paid Attendance</p>

<pre><code>1. Baseball 682,880
2. Men's Basketball 589,402
3. Football (FCS) 179,551
4. Women's Basketball 148,775
7. Women’s Volleyball 126,369
5. Men’s Lacrosse 120,975
6. Men’s Ice Hockey 116,147
8. Wrestling 88,761
9. Men’s Soccer 77,973
10. Softball 74,517
</code></pre>

<p>"this might be final four attendance, but I don't know what they use for football</p>

<p>NCAA Men's College World Series 2010 - College World Series Attendance Records</p>

<p>2006-07 NCAA DIVISION I CHAMPIONSHIPS
Top 10 Total Paid Attendance</p>

<ol>
<li>Baseball 682,880 </li>
<li>Men's Basketball 589,402</li>
<li>Football (FCS) 179,551</li>
<li>Women's Basketball 148,775</li>
<li>Women’s Volleyball 126,369</li>
<li>Men’s Lacrosse 120,975</li>
<li>Men’s Ice Hockey 116,147</li>
<li>Wrestling 88,761</li>
<li>Men’s Soccer 77,973</li>
<li>Softball 74,517"</li>
</ol>

<p>lol, this is like comparing watermelons to grenadines. What does this prove? First of all, the FCS is the non Div 1A teams---ie the small schools that play in the football "championship subdivision". Those are the attendance stats for the playoff games and don't even count Div 1 bowl games etc, which aren't "championships".</p>

<p>Second, the "NCAA baseball championship" lasts about 3 weeks so that figure probably includes all the playoff games, or at least all the games played in Omaha. The basketball numbers must be for the whole tournament (589,402 divided by 63 games = 9355 per game. Which includes all the early round games).</p>

<p>What this does show is that even the football playoff games for the minor non D1 schools that no one pays much attention to draws more fans than the Final Four in lacrosse, lol.</p>

<p>No, only football and men's basketball are major college sports. LAX is probably the third biggest college sport and it is followed by either hockey or baseball. Like many others on this thread have said, LAX is a regional sport. I haven't heard of a major LAX team west of South Bend, Indiana. </p>

<p>PS: GO IRISH! BEAT DOOK!</p>

<p>This is the best thing about the Lacrosse championship:</p>

<p>Notre Dame 8 Princeton 5
Notre Dame 12 Cornell 7</p>

<p>ND tops the Ivies in yet another category, lol.</p>

<p>The main college sports are Basketball and Football, in no particular order. After those two, you have a significant drop. </p>

<p>Baseball and Hockey are next and can also be classified as major college sports in my opinion. </p>

<p>Given the promise of professional fame and fortune, those four sports tend to attract the best athletes and the most attention. </p>

<p>After those 4 sports, I would say Lacrosse and Soccer are 5th and 6th, and can also be described as major college sports. However, until you start seeining a large number of their athletes making millions of dollars in salaries and advertisement money,and dating major celebrities and models, I don't see the status of those two sports matching those of Baseball and Hockey, let alone Basketball and Football.</p>

<p>The main college sports are Basketball and Football, in no particular order. After those two, you have a significant drop. </p>

<p>Baseball and Hockey are next and can also be classified as major college sports in my opinion. </p>

<p>Given the promise of professional fame and fortune, those four sports tend to attract the best athletes and the most attention. </p>

<p>After those 4 sports, I would say Lacrosse and Soccer are 5th and 6th, and can also be described as major college sports. However, until you start seeining a large number of their athletes making millions of dollars in salaries and advertisement money,and dating major celebrities and models, I don't see the status of those two sports matching those of Baseball and Hockey, let alone Basketball and Football.</p>

<p>it has to be a bitter pill for Princeton grads to swallow that they are now inferior in the one sport which they (the Ivy leaguers) see themselves as dominating and used to have an exclusive hold over for the most part, to a bunch of Catholic kids at a school where Lacrosse is the 5th or 6th most popular sport, lol. Symbolic of the loss of Ivy League prestige overall maybe........?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Cuse, so that is it?</p>

<p>only football and basketbal, out of about 30 sports, would be considered "major sports" in colleges?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yes.</p>

<p>
[quote]
How about baseball, track & field, hockey and soccer?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Nope. And this is coming from someone who loves and regularly attends college baseball and lax games.</p>

<p>"it has to be a bitter pill for Princeton grads to swallow that they are now inferior in the one sport which they (the Ivy leaguers) see themselves as dominating and used to have an exclusive hold over for the most part, to a bunch of Catholic kids at a school where Lacrosse is the 5th or 6th most popular sport, lol. Symbolic of the loss of Ivy League prestige overall maybe........?" </p>

<p>It's comments like this are why so many people dislike ND and it's fanbase.</p>

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</p>

<p>No. All this means is that the Ivy League (including Princeton) does not treat their lacrosse players like professional athletes and pay them a salary like ND does (and Duke and Virginia do). Your victory against Cornell rings hollow.</p>

<p>It's one thing for ND to compete with Big East, Big Ten, Pac Ten, SEC, etc. schools in football (and other sports) where the playing field is level and all competitors offer athletic scholarships. It's quite another for ND to beat up on schools that do not give them (and then shamelessly brag about it).</p>

<p>Let me ask you: is the fact that ND is currently inferior to the USCs and Floridas in football "symbolic of the loss of [ND] prestige overall maybe........?" You cannot even use academics as an excuse because you lost to Navy and Stanford, which has much, much higher academic and admissions standards for student-athletes than ND.</p>

<p>As a lacrosse player and a lacrosse fan at a powerhouse high school in North New Jersey (a known hot bed lower than LI/NY and Baltimore, but still up there) lacrosse is major sport to me. Just look at the games this past weekend... there was giant numbers there. The girls final: Northwestern vs. Maryland had the highest attendance for a girls lacrosse game EVER. Though lacrosse is no where near basketball and football, I would say it is definitely 3rd, and is definitely on the rise. I'd say in about 10 years it is going to be a HUGE sport; it is definitely on the rise. Anywhere on the in the Northeast... it would be considered a huge sport today, but nationally- give it time.</p>

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</p>

<p>No. Women's basketball is 3rd. Followed by baseball, hockey, soccer, volleyball, etc. in no particular order. Unlike the others which are international (and Olympian) sports, lacrosse is a regional U.S. sport.</p>

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</p>

<p>Lacrosse advocates probably said this 10 years ago and will probably be saying the same thing 10 years from now.</p>

<p>Lacrosse is indeed a major sport, but it is not third. Baseball and Hockey are third and fourth. Soccer is fifth. I would say that Lacrosse is sixth. Of course, on many campuses, Lacrosse is indeed the primary sport. But on a national level, it is not among the top 5 and will most likely not be a top 5 sport anytime in the near future.</p>

<p>I looked at this a few years ago. My conclusion is that there really are only 4 major sports that are national in nature on the college scene: football, men’s and women’s basketball, and baseball. Everything else is either regional or attracts little national publicity. </p>

<p>With specific regard to lacrosse, claims that it is anything but a regional sport are off. No school in major conferences like the Big 12, SEC, and the Pac 10 even field a men’s team. I don’t think any schools south of Durham, NC nor west of South Bend, IN compete in the men’s game and the women only have spotty representation. </p>

<p>Furthermore, the “diversity” that some colleges love to tout as demonstrating their compassion hasn’t found its way yet into this sport. It’s a rich kids game and has almost no racial diversity. Give lacrosse sticks to some of the black athletes on U Florida/U Texas/etc football team and it’s pretty obvious the NE prep school crowd would be outclassed and out of the game. </p>

<p>Here are the numbers by sport of colleges nationally competing in Division I:</p>

<p>Div I Men , Sport</p>

<p>329 , Basketball
299 , Cross Country
289 , Golf
287 , Baseball
264 , Track, Outdoor
260 , Tennis
241 , Track, Indoor
236 , Football
198 , Soccer
136 , Swimming
87 , Wrestling
59 , Ice Hockey
56 , LACROSSE
22 , Volleyball
22 , Water Polo
19 , Fencing
16 , Gymnastics
13 , Skiing
3 , Rifle</p>

<p>0 , Archery
0 , Bowling
0 , Equestrian
0 , Field Hockey
0 , Rowing
0 , Rugby
0 , Softball
0 , Squash
0 , Synchronized Swim</p>

<p>Div I Women , </p>

<p>328 , Basketball
325 , Cross Country
316 , Volleyball
308 , Tennis
307 , Soccer
304 , Track, Outdoor
293 , Track, Indoor
272 , Softball
234 , Golf
192 , Swimming
86 , Rowing
81 , LACROSSE
81 , Ice Hockey
78 , Field Hockey
64 , Gymnastics
32 , Water Polo
29 , Bowling
24 , Fencing
18 , Equestrian
14 , Skiing
9 , Squash
9 , Rifle
4 , Synchronized Swim
1 , Rugby
1 , Archery</p>

<p>0 , Baseball
0 , Football
0 , Wrestling</p>

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</p>

<p>That makes a lot sense, since you previously said that "Lacrosse and Soccer are 5th and 6th." So you just switch the order to fit your "top 5" argument. You seem to consistently make stuff up to suit your (especially Michigan-related) arguments. What you "would say" is virtually meaningless.</p>