Silverturtle's Guide to SAT and Admissions Success

<p>
[quote]
For SAT Subject tests, 750 or higher is a good score (with perhaps the exception of Math Level 2)

[/quote]
So what is a good score for Math Level 2?</p>

<p>
[quote]
So what is a good score for Math Level 2?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Merely given the percentiles, I would say 780+.</p>

<p>Thank you very much for the guide, silverturtle. It is indeed the greatest contribution you have made in CC, and many present and future CCers will find this guide one of the greatest resource they have ever used on CC. I should also thanks the reviewers, too. So thank you, christiansoldier, mifune, TurquoiseHexagon, crazybandit, and Jersey13.</p>

<p>Amazing job, Silverturtle. And everyone else who edited and contributed..:)</p>

<p>This is a good summary of CC's exceptional SAT and admissions advice. I wish I had started my SAT prep when this thread was around.</p>

<p>I really appreciate this. I'd say that this guide perfectly sums up what I refer to as the "CC conventional wisdom". I will share this with anyone who has questions about the process.</p>

<p>The UC system does not have any sort of a ED program.</p>

<p>so it doesnt matter which SAT you took then right? October and November will be the same thing then right?</p>

<p>^ That is correct.</p>

<p>
[Quote]
Thanks alot silverturtle! I will tell you my SAT results after reading your guide and applying them to practice tests. And can you be honest for my question? Is it possible to go from 1510 to a 1800+ within 4months on studying? I scored a 1510 because I was rushing through every question. When I took the QAS at home untimed I only missed 2 writing questions! Surprising!!

[/Quote]
</p>

<p>First of all Silver Turtle PHENOMENAL JOB. </p>

<p>To the cited question, there is no doubt in my mind that most people could jump from 1500 to 1800 in one month's prep time. It would depend upon they are stronger and whether they made silly mistakes or not. My daughter jumped 100 points in Math in 3 days from doing concentrated review.</p>

<p>For marking the CR section, what do you do? Underline, bracket, or something else to the line references or the specific words mentioned in the question? What would be more effective? </p>

<p>Thanks and great job on the guide.</p>

<p>Very well done. How long did you work on this, per chance?</p>

<p>
[quote]
For marking the CR section, what do you do? Underline, bracket, or something else to the line references or the specific words mentioned in the question? What would be more effective?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I put a mark next to the referenced line.</p>

<p>
[quote]
How long did you work on this, per chance?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I don't have an exact figure for the number of hours, but I began working on it shortly after school ended.</p>

<p>Fantastic Guide, Silverturtle. The Writing Guide is by far the best I have seen. You have made a great contribution to CC and we are thankful to have this guide.</p>

<p>Amazing work. Between this and xiggi's advice one has a pretty comprehensive guide to the process.
Silverturtle: What do you suggest would be a good testing schedule for an incoming junior. This student is NOT looking to 2400 it, but will likely need to establish a SAT vs. ACT preference and likely retakes. (Already has a less than satisfactory subject test score). Student might well ED, so last possible test date would be Nov. of senior year.</p>

<p>Should he start testing fall of junior year already? Any thoughts appreciated!</p>

<p>
[quote]
Should he start testing fall of junior year already?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I recommend starting with some light preparatory work with both the SAT and ACT this summer or when school starts. Ideally, he would develop a preference relatively quickly. At that point, just focus on the one test. He should take the test whenever he feels ready, as long as he takes it at least once during his junior year.</p>

<p>Man i have more than 3 months to study for the SAT, using the blue book once a week just for testing is enough?</p>

<p>On the other days i will be learning grammar, vocabulary, writing essays, reading and solving
math problems, so that means im only going to use the blue book in sunday and just for a complete test and review.</p>

<p>Is this a good way to study?</p>

<p>PD: Im a rising junior</p>

<p>
[quote]
The only way that you can be relieved from this is if the college accepts a petition that your financial aid is not sufficient to allow your attendance. Nonetheless, you should not apply ED to a school if you need financial aid, nor should you apply ED if the school is not your first choice. ED does generally afford an admissions advantage, though.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Please post the source of this info about a "petition" and which schools require it. This is at odds with the Common Application ED agreement:
[quote]
Should a student who applies for financial aid not be offered an award that makes attendance possible, the student may decline the offer of admission and be released from the Early Decision commitment.

[/quote]

<a href="https://www.commonapp.org/CommonApp/docs/downloadforms/ED_Agreement.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;https://www.commonapp.org/CommonApp/docs/downloadforms/ED_Agreement.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>It's also at odds with the real world:</p>

<p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/04/education/edlife/strategy.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/04/education/edlife/strategy.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Imagine what would happen if such a "petition" were denied. Imagine a school expelling a student somehow compelled to attend when the bill couldn't be paid. Imagine the publicity.</p>

<p>Some schools have given up, eliminating ED due to this myth, where too many well-to-do students were applying ED. Many students get acceptable financial aid at ED time; some schools keep trying to attract top students who have one dream school and need financial aid.</p>

<p>I believe, vossron, that it is a matter of word choice.</p>

<p>From Columbia University:</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you are admitted under the Early Decision program, you are obligated to accept Columbia's offer of admission. Once you accept Columbia's offer of admission, you may file no further college applications and must withdraw any other applications that have already been submitted. Only students who (after consultation with the Financial Aid Office) cite financial reasons for not attending will be released from the Early Decision agreement.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>The "petition" the OP mentioned was probably in reference to the citation of financial reasons for not attending the university that many colleges have in place.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Man i have more than 3 months to study for the SAT, using the blue book once a week just for testing is enough?</p>

<p>On the other days i will be learning grammar, vocabulary, writing essays, reading and solving
math problems, so that means im only going to use the blue book in sunday and just for a complete test and review.</p>

<p>Is this a good way to study?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>From what sources will you "be learning grammar, vocabulary, writing essays, reading and solving math problems"?</p>

<p>
[quote]
The "petition" the OP mentioned was probably in reference to the citation of financial reasons that many colleges have in place.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yes, you correctly read what I wrote. </p>

<p>@vossron: I personally know someone who had to fight very hard to get out of the ED agreement even after indicating financial reasons because the school maintained that their initial offer was sufficient.</p>