Transfer Admissions 101

<p>enzo, I found that this is a grey area. If you got dual credit and it is reported on your hs transcript, I don't think you will need the separate transcript.</p>

<p>My S took one college class during a summer while still in hs. He reported it on the applications under the list of "all colleges attended", where you put the school, year(s) attended and whether you were a degree candidate. Only one or two schools wanted a transcript on that one. He was not seeking college credit for that class, though.</p>

<p>Can you clarify more about your situation?</p>

<p>Thanks for your expertise Andale. </p>

<p>I went to a HS that was closely affiliated with a CUNY college, as it was located on its campus. Therefore, students were asked to take college classes during senior year, which they called bridge year. I am pretty sure the grades were not reported on the HS transcript because for humanities seminar, which I received credit for at my current college as Literature, the grade that appears on the HS transcript is from our teacher (who taught the class with the professor) and the grade that appears on the college transcript is from the professor. </p>

<p>I am faced with a dilemma because I was able to transfer those credits to my current college so I am assuming I will have to put down that I attended that college on my transfer application correct? I was also put on probation by the college for my 1.something GPA. I do hope to receive credit for the four classes I have taken but it seems unlikely I will since my grades were C,C,D,A. </p>

<p>So Andale, what do you think?
Will I have to report it on the apps under list of colleges attended?
and equally as important...Will I have to get a Dean's Statement from that college, because seeing as though I was on probation, I'm not sure that is going to go over so well with the adcoms. </p>

<p>And yes, the moral here is to work hard in hs!</p>

<p>This thread is a great idea! Thank you for all the great information.</p>

<p>Well, enzo, I'm really <em>not</em> an expert. And I don't know the answer for you. I believe you will only need a Dean Statement from your current college. As to the courses you took from a college, while at hs.... I really don't know. You'll have to scour the website of the college where you want to transfer and/or ask the admissions office and/or start a thread here with your specific qx and see if anyone has the answer.</p>

<p>Best of luck.</p>

<p>If I am starting college in fall 07, and want to transfer for fall 2008, do they look at my first semester GPA and give me provisional admission on that basis?</p>

<p>Yes, they look at your first semester GPA. Some will ask for mid-semester grade estimates for your spring term. Some of these will let you self-report; some will want prof signatures/initials.</p>

<p>Some will make it expressly conditional on seeing your grades, if they feel they need more information to evaluate you, before they give you firm acceptance. But this is not particularly common.</p>

<p>Virtually all will in effect be provisional, because they will ask for your spring transcript and if your grades tank spring term, that could be a problem.</p>

<p>In terms of recommendations, is it a big negative if multiple recommendations come from different professors in the same academic department? For some reason, I have two good relationships with two history professors with an additional third history professor willing to write me an optional rec as she got to know me through freshman forum introduction classes and when I visited her office hours.</p>

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In terms of recommendations, is it a big negative if multiple recommendations come from different professors in the same academic department? For some reason, I have two good relationships with two history professors with an additional third history professor willing to write me an optional rec as she got to know me through freshman forum introduction classes and when I visited her office hours.

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<p>Recommendations tend to be more in the iffy area. They're not going to really make up for any part of your application if you're lacking in an area, so I don't suggest getting that many. I'd only send 3 recommendations at most. If you believe that your professors, all of them, can tell a different story about you, and have it be unique things specific to what they saw in you, then by all means, get all 3. But if they are just going to be the same things, then you only really need 1. Repetition isn't that good.</p>

<p>Re 3 recommendations from profs all in the same field: I think it depends a lot on your intended major. Two from profs in your intended major would generally be a good thing. Sending a 3rd - I agree with Cvjn not to do 3 if they do not provide different insights. Further, even if they were in my major field, I would prefer to see the 3rd from a different field.</p>

<p>Can anyone give instructions on how to finish the "Midterm report"
Thank you.</p>

<p>
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Can anyone give instructions on how to finish the "Midterm report"
Thank you.

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<p>Since I have only a faint idea of what you mean...</p>

<p>Is your Mid-Term report basically what you turn into colleges on your Midterm to show them that you're keeping your grades up, other than your first semester, and heading into the roughly same direction with second (or better) semester?</p>

<p>If that is what you mean...</p>

<p>What I did was, I typed up some stuff on Excel, and made it look professional. I had professors write my grade, my expected final grade, a signature and then a rough 1-2 sentence explanation on how I was doing. I think I went a bit overboard... but that's the rough idea.</p>

<p>This might have been said, but if not...well here it is.</p>

<p>Some colleges ask whether or not you've been in contact with anyone from the school. Whether it be a coach or an admissions counselor, via phone or e-mail. It'd be best to record this person's information (name, position, etc.) and the date you two made contact. I'm pondering why they might ask it, but it might be for the sake of seriousness. Make a spreadsheet with transfer schools with contacts and other essential information. Losing track of schools is easy if you're throwing out transfer apps such as much myself. Organization is the first thing you need in order to transfer properly.</p>

<p>


</p>

<p>This is an issue that arises with Transfer Admissions.</p>

<p>PROBLEM:</p>

<ol>
<li>As you say, there is no universally accepted date for response to transfer admissions decisions.</li>
<li>This often creates conflicts, where one or more schools want to hear back from you before you have even heard from other schools.</li>
<li>To make matters worse, there often seem to be a few schools which are VERY VERY late in transmitting their admissions decisions (well into June, sometimes).</li>
</ol>

<p>SOLUTIONS:
1. Extensions: Some schools will readily extend the time for your decision. Some even say so in their acceptance materials. Some don't say so, but you can call and ask. Some will say no, some yes. You might want to give some thought to the reason you give for wanting the extension - "waiting to hear from other schools" can work; but you might also consider "want to visit your school and can't make the time until after my finals," "don't have my financial arrangements fully worked out" or whatever you can think of (as long as it's honest). Re seeking an extension: It is OKAY to do this. Many times students worry that it will be frowned upon. YOU ARE ALREADY ACCEPTED, so it does not hurt to try.
2. Getting an earlier answer:You can try for an answer from the school(s) upon which you are waiting. Again, some will give you the earlier response; some won't. Sometimes they've actually made the decision, but you just haven't received it yet. Again, I don't think it will be a "black mark" to seek the earlier response. It can be scary, I know. But it really shouldn't hurt to ask. And, you're basically telling them that you're wanted elsewhere but prefer their school. No harm in that .
3. When you are finally and truly stuck: Let's say you have an acceptance to your second choice, but haven't heard from your first choice. Go ahead and accept the spot at the bird you have in hand. Let's hope that the deposit is not too stiff; because you do stand the chance of losing it.
a. This is not the same as double accepting as a freshman admit, which has the common May 1 reply date. You are truly in a bind, not of your own making. So it's not an ethical violation, imo (and I think most others who have commented on the issue feel the same way).
b. If you get a "Yes" from your first choice, let the other school know right away that you are withdrawing from your spot. Some will even give your deposit back. Again, it can't hurt to ask.
c. Related topic: Housing can be very tight for transfers at some schools. Sometimes they will tell you to return your housing form immediately upon acceptance <em>even if you are not sure yet if you are going to this school.</em> Go ahead and do this. Often there is no housing deposit until you actually make your decision to go to this school.</p>

<p>how much time should i give profs to write recs? i just found out that i can apply to a college for spring transfer, which i previously thought was not possible. the sooner i get all my applications materials, the sooner i will find out. so should i just tell profs to send in my recs ASAP, before Nov. 15? im hoping to have all my materials sent out within the next week or two, but i feel bad rushing my profs for recs.</p>

<p>does applying earlier then the deadline elp in transfer...i mean they dont have stuff like early decison or early application rite...so does applying early actually help....???</p>

<p>Not all schools have that program though. Only when a school has ROLLING admission, does applying early truly help.</p>

<p>Applying early only helps with rolling, as cvjn says, at the more selective schools. Many of the quite selective schools, with non-rolling admissions, don't really even BEGIN to process transfer apps until they have finished with the HUGE WORKLOAD of freshman apps. So, it often doesn't even work to check on whether your materials are all received until quite some time has passed - they just haven't entered it into their system yet.</p>

<p>At some of the less selective schools, even if they are not "officially" rolling admissions, it might help you get a quicker answer. Whether it enhances your admissions chances.... ??? But I'm talking about schools with pretty high acceptance rates anyway.</p>

<p>I have a couple of questions... one addressed to the rolling thing. </p>

<p>1) When a school says, "For spring admission, application review begins on a rolling basis in November with priority given to applications received by the Nov. 15 deadline," does that mean it will advantageous for me to send everything in by November 1?</p>

<p>2) Fee waiver for application - How do I get it?</p>

<p>3) High School Report - How does that work? Do I just call up my high school and ask them to write a recommendation for me?</p>

<p>Thanks in advance!</p>

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1) When a school says, "For spring admission, application review begins on a rolling basis in November with priority given to applications received by the Nov. 15 deadline," does that mean it will advantageous for me to send everything in by November 1?

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<p>Yup. However, my personal rule (not based on any facts at all) is when I see a school is rolling, I'll try and get my things in as soon as possible, while also making sure my app is as good as it can be. </p>

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2) Fee waiver for application - How do I get it?

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<p>Not too sure, I think you might have to call admissions office for that one.</p>

<p>
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3) High School Report - How does that work? Do I just call up my high school and ask them to write a recommendation for me?</p>

<p>Thanks in advance!

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<p>Are you sure it's recommendation? It might just be your transcript. I haven't met too many colleges that require a high school recommendation after you're out of college. The ones I've seen are ones that require recommendation from a professor, or the dean. </p>

<p>I'm just going to assume that's going to be the transcript, and so yes, you can just call them to send it, or get a sealed copy yourself and send it yourself. I did the latter cause my dates weren't going to line up well, and didn't trust my advisors from high school.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Are you sure it's recommendation? It might just be your transcript. I haven't met too many colleges that require a high school recommendation after you're out of college. The ones I've seen are ones that require recommendation from a professor, or the dean.</p>

<p>I'm just going to assume that's going to be the transcript, and so yes, you can just call them to send it, or get a sealed copy yourself and send it yourself. I did the latter cause my dates weren't going to line up well, and didn't trust my advisors from high school.

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<p>I think it is a recommendation. Under Oberlin's list of required stuff, they have the High School Report and the HS transcript as different things. They also provide a link to the report. I guess I'll call Oberlin tomorrow about how to approach it. Once again, thanks for answering my questions.</p>