UChicago vs. NU vs. Ross

<p>I disagree with you. </p>

<p>NU recruiting is not strictly greater than Ross's recruiting. If anything, Ross >= NU. </p>

<p>Prestige is stupid.</p>

<p>I agree that the NU Econ degree in itself is more worthwhile than the Ross BBA, but it depends what you're interested in studying, really.</p>

<p>Furthermore, UM social/fun >> NU social/fun</p>

<p>For what its worth, I go to another semi-target in the big 10, and we have interns and FT going to every BB in NY and Chicago plus a few going to Moelis, Allen & Co, and Blackstone...so theres no ****ing way that there's nobody going to GS from Michigan. And I GUARANTEE you that IB recruiters do not get on their laptops and look at USNews/BizWeek to look at rankings and see where they're going to recruit. Thats retarded. Either way, I there's no gap in recruiting at either of the three schools mentioned. If I had my pick I would definitely go to UM as it would be the most fun as well as provide you with the same opportunities that the other two would.</p>

<p>And I love how the OP is tossing the UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO out of the equation because it's getting "no love" on college confidential haha.</p>

<p>I would argue that there are much fewer kids at NU who are interested in IBD than the number at Ross. The fact that NU still sends so many to BB's goes to show that we are as much of a target, if not more of one for these banks. And of course, we ARE a private university. From what I've heard, and correct me if I'm wrong, Ross kids cannot go around their career website applying to every single firm they want to -- they're limited to a certain number by some university policy. Not the case at NU. </p>

<p>And for what it's worth, at my BB superday in NYC, there were only kids from the Ivy League, Stanford, NU, and UofC. Probably a few from Georgetown and MIT as well.</p>

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NU recruiting is not strictly greater than Ross's recruiting. If anything, Ross >= NU.

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<p>Sorry if I was under a misconception then; this statement was purely anecdotal as I've met MANY more NU kids than Ross kids, but it's no where near logical to extrapolate from my own narrow experience generalities for the entire industry. If this is the case, my apologies. </p>

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Prestige is stupid.

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<p>Not when employers/grad schools care about prestige, which is in many cases true. </p>

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I agree that the NU Econ degree in itself is more worthwhile than the Ross BBA, but it depends what you're interested in studying, really.

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<p>I wasn't even referring to the job market, but that rather personally as either a person or even if I was an employer, I would much rather choose a student with a well-rounded education than one who studied "business", which in my opinion isn't something that will necessarily make you more intelligent/a better thinker. Also if the OP decides not to go for fiance, they will have many more options with the NU degree. </p>

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Furthermore, UM social/fun >> NU social/fun

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<p>I guess it's all relative. Although I do party in college, I'm much more of an EC guy, and when I visited NU I loved the social setup of NU.</p>

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Ross kids cannot go around their career website applying to every single firm they want to -- they're limited to a certain number by some university policy. Not the case at NU.

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<p>False. You can drop your resume to every single firm you want to at Ross.</p>

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Prestige is stupid.

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Not when employers/grad schools care about prestige, which is in many cases true.

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<p>After separating recruiting out of the equation, prestige is stupid.</p>

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I agree that the NU Econ degree in itself is more worthwhile than the Ross BBA, but it depends what you're interested in studying, really.

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I wasn't even referring to the job market, but that rather personally as either a person or even if I was an employer, I would much rather choose a student with a well-rounded education than one who studied "business", which in my opinion isn't something that will necessarily make you more intelligent/a better thinker. Also if the OP decides not to go for fiance, they will have many more options with the NU degree.

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<p>I completely agree. But if recruiting is the end goal, the content of the degree is less important.</p>

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Furthermore, UM social/fun >> NU social/fun

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I guess it's all relative. Although I do party in college, I'm much more of an EC guy, and when I visited NU I loved the social setup of NU.

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<p>UM social/fun >> NU social/fun</p>

<p>UChicago is probably the best of your choices in terms of sheer recruiting, buut if you can't stomach the hardcore nature of the school...pick Ross or NU</p>

<p>Thank you guys so much! It's a really hard choice for me right now, so your perspectives are really helpful right now.</p>

<p>I think I will try for one of two Certificate Programs at NU if I go there, and probably try to get a dual Econ/BBA if I choose that. Is it true that NU gets recruited regionally mostly, and that Ross gets more from NYC? Also, is there any similar programs in UChicago that tries to help students get into finance?</p>

<p>You honestly do not even need the Kellogg certificate to get into IBD (NYC offices) from NU. A lot of the incoming first year analysts don't have it and a good number of the summer analysts don't either. Also, many students are going to the NYC office of BB's this summer. Networking is everything. You can't just rely on on-campus recruiting.</p>

<p>Get a grip on who is giving you advise abous Ross, students at big state schools. They are fine schools and they do place a handful of students at some IB, but they are not target schools. As an Econ or math major at a top private liberal arts school, like NU, will serve you better later. UG business is worthless unless it's a school like Wharon, and only because of calibre of students they admit and also combination of required liberal arts courses. </p>

<p>I have been in the business for 25 + years from front to back. My daughter knew that she wanted to go into IB since high school. She didn't decide to ge a liberal arts education without consulting my friends. She also didn't pick math as her major because she liked pain. She interviewed this winter and received 4 offers on her own through her school. She did better than most people in AEM. </p>

<p>The street has a certain view of students from Chicago, unless you are not the norm you won't get the same love as NU. </p>

<p>This is all I am going to say about this matter because I understand most people are very defensive of their schools.</p>

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Cornell ILR or NYU Stern? Cornell ILR.

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NYU isn't a state school so I don't see what you're getting at.</p>

<p>Don't know much about business and was reading this for fun but that post bothered me.</p>

<p>I would probably be between Northwestern and UMich if I were you. Maybe visit both and see where you fit better? I'm sure you could be VERY successful from either school and you don't want to be miserable for 4 years.</p>

<p>What view does the street have of chicago students? That they come from a school with an academic rigor harder than ivies? That they have the best econ program in the world with more faculty winners of the Nobel Prize for economics than any other school? It's not like recruiters are going to look down on you for going to UofC, thats just ridiculous. All three schools have a TON of alumni working in IB and all three schools are target schools. Since the definition of a target school is a company that actively recruits on campus, and since all schools have all the BB's and top boutiques hire from there, then choose which one fits you best. If you want the incredibly hard/prestige factor then go to UofC, if you want a top liberal arts education then go to NW, if you want the typical party/sports/academic college experience go to UofM. They'll all provide you with ample opportunities to get into IB.</p>

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Get a grip on who is giving you advise abous Ross, students at big state schools. They are fine schools and they do place a handful of students at some IB, but they are not target schools.

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<p>With all due respect, you are highly mistaken. Are you actually claiming that Ross is not a target school? Why does Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Lazard, Evercore, Greenhill, JP Morgan, Credit Suisse, UBS, Citi, DB, BarCap, RBS, Perella, etc., etc., the list goes on and on and on -- every major investment bank that has an office in America recruits and hires analysts and summer analysts from Ross.</p>

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UG business is worthless unless it's a school like Wharon

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<p>A worthless degree? That is the most ridiculous statement I've read all night (see above).</p>

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As an Econ or math major at a top private liberal arts school, like NU, will serve you better later.

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<p>Could you please elaborate? Why will it serve you better later? In terms of the intellectual value to yourself? Definitely. Professionally? Probably a negligible difference.</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/808375-what-better-business-major-econ.html?highlight=business%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/808375-what-better-business-major-econ.html?highlight=business&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Read JHS and my posts on the first page. I believe JHS is a graduate of Yale and a senior partner at a law firm. There were many posts on that thread by business professors and people with MBA degrees.</p>

<p>This is from one of JHS posts:

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On the other hand, this is what the head of an Arthur Andersen (RIP) office told my Intro To Financial Accounting class -- a speech that literally changed my life: "I'm not here to recruit CPAs. CPAs are a dime a dozen. Anyone with decent study skills can learn the rules and pass a CPA exam, and anyone who does that and owns a calculator can be a competent accountant. What I need, what's in short supply, is someone who can have an idea, and can develop it and express it clearly, and then go into a boardroom full of people who are 30 years older than he is and impress the heck out of them. If you're that kind of person, I really want to hire you, and I don't care how good your accounting skills are now. I know how to train accountants, but I need people worth training." (Note: reconstructed from memory, but that was the clear idea.)

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<p>Students who are already in business school I would encourage to combine it with courses in liberal arts school - philosophy, psychology, math, econ or even art history. On the other hand, what my daughter had to do was to take finance courses at her university's business school to demonstrate that she's capable of understanding those topics. One course someone told her to take was psychology if she wanted to go into S&T.</p>

<p>For the record I go to a private school and have worked and will work on WS... so that "everyone saying Michigan goes to a B10 school" is false. </p>

<p>I have no stake in this, I'm just telling you from a pure recruiting standpoint I'd go with Ross>NU. As someone noted, prestige on Wall Street essentially means whether the school is a target.</p>

<p>I have no idea why nobody is talking about chicago??? I suggested Michigan because it's literally the ONLY public school I would consider taking over the likes of UofC, NW, IVY, etc (throw Berkley in there as well, although not as much as Michigan). The fact that it has sports, typical party college atmosphere, as well as a sick b-school makes it pretty damn appealing. But if were talking b/w UofC and NW, I would have thought Chicago would win be leaps and bounds. It's definitely the most prestigious and has incredible recruiting. The only downside I can think of is that it's ridiculously hard. I can't think of any reason to pick NW over Chicago however I can pick a few for the opposite argument. Not saying NW isn't incredible I'm just stating my opinion.</p>

<p>oldfort, I agree with you on the whole, all else equal (i.e. recruiting, enjoyment of undergrad experience). I am actually a Math & Econ major. I'm just saying that, once you get your foot in the door (which is very easy to do coming from a school like Ross), your degree is not what will keep you back from climbing the corporate ladder over a NU liberal arts major.</p>

<p>Keep in mind that these two specific people: giants92 and Alexandre, are STRICTLY orthodox people who believe that U michigan ross is SECOND ONLY to Wharton and HYP. I have a brother who graduated from Ross and he told me that most students from Ross graduate and go to commercial banking instead of Investment banking.</p>

<p>Don't get me wrong, commercial banking gets you very good ($50 - 60k) salary in the beginning, feasible working hours, but have very VERY poor exit opportunities (a.k.a only enter commercial banking if you have a family, or cannot find a job in IBD)</p>

<p>U Mich is nothing close to an ivy or Duke. Get over yourself.</p>

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Keep in mind that these two specific people: giants92 and Alexandre, are STRICTLY orthodox people who believe that U michigan ross is SECOND ONLY to Wharton and HYP.</p>

<p>U Mich is nothing close to an ivy or Duke. Get over yourself.

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<p>Alexandre, maybe. Me? No. When did I ever say that? I have never asserted that Ross is "second only to HYP + W". Ross is behind Stanford, Dartmouth, Duke, Columbia, Cornell, and MIT in terms of getting into IB. However, you are wrong in saying it's "nothing close". Just look at placement stats. It's certainly not behind NU though (roughly equal/possible slight edge to Ross).</p>

<p>Don't put words into other people's mouths.</p>

<p>At top BB this summer (only IBD):</p>

<p>NU 5
UMich 2
UofC 1</p>

<p>of course this is only a single data point.</p>

<p>Cant rely on single data points at all. sometimes schools will send like 10 to one bb and 0 to another. Based on my experience interning and now working as an analyst at a top bb, all three schools are basically equal for recruiting and any perceived difference is just pointless nitpicking and/or blind alumni loyalty.</p>