2 more writing questions

<li>London (differs from) other cities, (such as) Paris and
New York, (in that) its shopping areas are so (widely)
spread out. (No error)</li>
</ol>

<p>Im not sure if "in that"should be “in which”, or is it no erorr?
22. The architect’s research shows that even when builders
(construct) houses (of stone), they (still)
use the hammer
more than (any tool). No error</p>

<p>Is the comparison between hammer and any tool correct? whats the correct usage? or is it NO ERROR?</p>

<p>first one, I think is no error.</p>

<p>second, it shouldn't be "any tool" it should be "any other tool" because the hammer is a tool, so it would be fault to say that it's used more often than itself.</p>

<p>In the first question, "in that" means "for the reason that" or "because."</p>

<p>ooh, thankyou guys =D</p>

<p>I know this is 2 years old but I stumbled upon it and I have to say, I think the answer is "widely". I think it's redundant.. if something is spread out it is already wide so widely is unnecessary.</p>

<p>For the second question "any other" would be the appropriate answer.</p>

<p>i disagree on the "widely" part. I think its no error. I could be wrong, but widely is definitely okay here.</p>

<p>I thought the rule for redundancy was that if you can remove an adjective without altering the meaning of the sentence in any way then the the adjective is redundant. As far as I can see there is no difference between:</p>

<p>London differs from other cities, such as Paris and New York, in that its shopping areas are so spread out.</p>

<p>and</p>

<p>London differs from other cities, such as Paris and New York, in that its shopping areas are so widely spread out</p>