2400 in three different test dates?

<p>After the June SAT test scores, I now have scores from three different test dates.
My combined score is 2400, but I got the 800 in each section at different times. (Ex: 800 Math first, 800 Writing second, 800 Critical reading third). Just my luck!</p>

<p>However, I was wondering if this would be in any way look down upon.
My highest single seating was 2290.</p>

<p>I'm unclear with the whole super score process. Is combined score what you would generally "say" or is it single seating?</p>

<p>Thanks!</p>

<p>bump 10char</p>

<p>It depends if the school you apply to accepts score choice. If it does, you can send the 2400 as your "superscore" (of course, they'll know its from 3 different test dates, but still...)</p>

<p>You would usually simply state your highest combined, at least that's what I have always presumed. Almost all colleges will consider your highest across all sections, so for all intensive purposes you have a 2400, but some schools do not allow the use of score choice and require all dates. In that case, I am not really sure how they weight superscore and such, but in either way your standardized testing seems great and that should not be a reason for concern as your apply.</p>

<p>Some schools accept your super-scored score, and some only accept your highest score in a single seating. It depends on the school.</p>

<p>Alright, thanks!
I was just sorta confused over the whole superscoring deal</p>

<p>wow! great job with the 2400!</p>

<p>Some of you guys seem somewhat wrong.</p>

<p>He can't explicitly send the 2400. He can only send the scores from each individual testing date. Whether he can decide which of the 3 to send depends on whether he is allowed score choice. Score choice is simply the ability to choose which scores to send on a checklist when you decide to use a score report from the College Board website. The checklist gives you 3 options for 3 testing dates. You cannot mix and match scores from individual sections of the SAT.</p>

<p>Super-scoring, on the other hand, is a process used by some colleges. THEY decide to look at only your highest sections, in which case you should send all 3 scores. </p>

<p>
[quote]
It depends if the school you apply to accepts score choice. If it does, you can send the 2400 as your "superscore" (of course, they'll know its from 3 different test dates, but still...)

[/quote]

No, it doesn't depend on score choice. If a school accepts score choice and super-scores, then you should send all 3 scores. If a school does not accept score choice and super-scores, then you should (and technically have to) send all 3.

[quote]
You would usually simply state your highest combined, at least that's what I have always presumed. Almost all colleges will consider your highest across all sections, so for all intensive purposes you have a 2400, but some schools do not allow the use of score choice and require all dates. In that case, I am not really sure how they weight superscore and such, but in either way your standardized testing seems great and that should not be a reason for concern as your apply.

[/quote]

You don't state your highest combined unless they ask you for it on an application. You have to send your official score reports. Whether these amount to a 2400 or a 2290 depends on whether the school super-scores by its own discretion. If you decide to apply to a school that does NOT super-score, then it will see that your score is a 2290, and you should send only your highest single score (the 2290, or if the school doesn't consider the writing section the highest composite CR + math score), or if the school doesn't accept score choice you must send all 3.

[quote]
Some schools accept your super-scored score, and some only accept your highest score in a single seating. It depends on the school.

[/quote]

Either way you would have to, or should, send all 3. In order for all 3 scores to be super-scored you would have to send all 3; if they only accept your highest score in a single seating, you might as well send all 3.</p>

<p>Oh thanks, crazybandit for your very detailed explanation and clearing things up !</p>