A couple of Q's regarding BME and engineering as a whole.

<p>Alright so I plan to go to Community College of Philadelphia where I will do get an associate's degree in engineering science. Then I will sign up for dual-admission to Drexel program that is offered at CCP.</p>

<p>Aside from school courses and things like that, what do you guys recommend for independent study? Like books on math, physics, chem, etc. etc.</p>

<p>I want to be atleast semi-prepared for the heavy courseload that will follow with an engineering major.</p>

<p>also, this is kind of off-topic, but should I study my ass off for the SATs even if I'm going to community college? Do colleges even look at SAT scores after you have done two years of college?</p>

<p>MIGHT WANNA GO HERE
SOME TIPS I GOT FOR BME</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showthread.php?t=222845&highlight=Biomedical%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showthread.php?t=222845&highlight=Biomedical&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>BASICALLY IN ONE SENTENCE- ITS BETTER TO MAJOR IN A MORE TRADITIONAL ENG. MAJOR TO GO INTO BME FIELD.</p>

<p>I SUGGEST u TO take one of these majors AND MINOR IN BME to go into BME field</p>

<p>Electrical Engineering - for students wishing to study the design and development of medical devices, signal processing, and medical imaging. </p>

<p>Chemical Engineering - for studies of transport within physiological systems, drug delivery, and development of engineered tissues. </p>

<p>Mechanical Engineering - for studies of the mechanics of the human body in health and disease and applications to medical devices and orthopedics.</p>

<p>Well, from a personal standpoint I'd say a major in mechanical engineering and then going into BME would be more interesting and enjoyable for me.</p>

<p>However, what does the future hold for mechanical enigneering, electrical engineering, or chemical engineering?</p>

<p>I've got my mind set on one thing BME, but which one of these majors would be the BEST in combination with BME? In terms of like lucrativeness and the future of these professions.</p>

<p>Thanks for your input!</p>

<p>BME or anything related to biotech is garbage now, because of the hype. No offense.</p>

<p>So you are telling me that BME is garbage? In this day and age where prosthetics and immortality are focal points in the future of medicine? I find that really hard to grasp!</p>

<p>What do you plan to major in, subject?</p>

<p>I am currently a bioE at UCSD, I think I will apply to ChemE, MechE, and math programs for transfering.</p>

<p>There is one very major limiting factor to the biotech field that most people just don't see. no, i am not talking about ethical considerations, much more concrete than that. and i don't feel philanthropic enough to give out this kinda valuable info, because I think it is funny to see idiots jump into fad majors.</p>

<p>i think majoring in chemE to go to the BME field is a good idea</p>

<p>Government economists expect chemical engineering jobs to grow as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014. There should be job growth outside manufacturing -- in research and testing, biopharmaceuticals, biotechnology for example. There should also be job opportunities as experienced engineers retire.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the average yearly earnings of chemical engineers in 2005 as $79,230. </p>

<p>Government economists expect job growth for electrical engineers to be as fast as the average for all careers through 2014. Use of foreign engineering services will limit job growth. However, there should be enough job openings for graduating electrical engineering majors.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the average yearly earnings of electrical engineers as $76,060 in 2005</p>

<p>Government economists expect job growth for mechanical engineers to be as fast as the average for all careers through 2014.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the average yearly earnings of mechanical engineers in 2005 as $70,000.</p>

<p>At my school, majoring in ChemE and minoring in BME is not posssible because there are NO engineering minors at my school.</p>

<p>oh thats not good. well what options r there in Chem E</p>

<p>i think u said ur school has biochem in chemE, so thats a good option to enter BME</p>

<p>"I am currently a bioE at UCSD, I think I will apply to ChemE, MechE, and math programs for transfering.</p>

<p>There is one very major limiting factor to the biotech field that most people just don't see. no, i am not talking about ethical considerations, much more concrete than that. and i don't feel philanthropic enough to give out this kinda valuable info, because I think it is funny to see idiots jump into fad majors."</p>

<p>hmmmm.............</p>

<p>Yea my friend is doing BioChemE, with a double major in BioChem. She is graduating this december and already has some job offers lined up.</p>

<p>where is she planning to go into..</p>

<p>subject, I consider that really egotistical of you. Even though I doubt you have this "secret" you claim to have, just the thought of you leading people astray for entertainment is utterly disgusting.</p>

<p>tom725, thanks for your input. I'm going to do a bit of reading about chemical engineering and see if it's right for me. I'm also going to be looking at schools which allow you to major as an engineer (chem, mech, electrical, etc. etc.) and then minor/double major as a BME. Oh and do recommend any universities which allow you to do the latter?</p>

<p>She is going into the pharmaceutical industry.</p>

<p>please, I told you in my first reply that biotech is garbage, how is that leading people? but I also do not feel obligated to tell you my reasoning, because it is a rather valuable piece of info that I don't want people spewing all over the internet.</p>

<p>Penn State University: College of Engineering
Dept. of Chemical Engineering</p>

<p>Chemical Engineering: Bioprocess & Biomolecular Engineering Option (BBE)</p>

<p>Recent advances in the life sciences - the sequencing of the human genome, the development of transgenic animals and plants, the use of recombinant DNA technology, and the unraveling of the molecular basis of disease - have opened up exciting new opportunities for Chemical Engineers. By combining these advances in molecular biology with the unique capabilities of chemical engineering, Chemical Engineers are making novel contributions to the production of new medicines, the development of artificial organs, the detection of biological and chemical toxins, and to our quantitative understanding of complex biological processes and systems. </p>

<p>In order to effectively contribute to this diverse field, students in the Bioprocessing and Biomolecular Engineering Option need to develop a strong foundation in molecular and cell biology, biochemistry, biomolecular engineering, and the biophysical processes required to purify biological molecules. This is accomplished through a combination of core science and engineering courses, along with a set of electives that give students an opportunity to pursue specialized areas of particular interest. The impact of biological advances on human health, agriculture, industry, and the environment will increasingly depend upon the skills of chemical engineers who have a strong understanding of the life sciences. Employment opportunities for students in the Bioprocessing and Biomolecular Engineering Option are thus expected to be very good. There are currently over 1200 smaller biotechnology companies in the U.S., in addition to a number of very large pharmaceutical companies. And many traditional chemical companies are now developing significant "life sciences" programs. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) estimates that 15-20% of all chemical engineering graduates are currently employed in biotechnology and biopharmaceutical related industries.</p>

<p>I have been interested in Chemical Engineering, there's a grt option (shown above) in my school to enter the the BME field.</p>

<p>the thing in BME is that to get a good position in the field you have to have a masters or Phd.</p>

<p>and the number of graduates r just increasing, in 02 there were 7000 now theres about 10,000, imagine how much it is in 2015.
so theres gonna be competion.</p>

<p>and this field is mainly influenced by the baby boomers so in the 2020s or 2030s the demand may go down.
biomed is limited to medical and health field.</p>

<p>if you take a traditional one like Chem E, M E....the options r more broad</p>

<p>subjecttochange,
your comments really show how much you know about the BME major or even grad school as a whole. </p>

<p>You do know that many labs have a mixture of EE, MechE, chemE, BME grad students, right? Many professors integrate biology and electronics, so being a BME, meche, cheme, ee major doens't matter. Plus, as a grad student you can take whatever class helps you with your research. I'm a BME grad student taking EE classes to learn about lasers and non-linear optics. So i wouldnt' say BME is a garbage major when you can do the same stuff all other engineering majors do.</p>

<p>that guy is just messing w/ us, ignore him.</p>