Academics

<p>This is for anyone who knows much about AC's academic programs:</p>

<p>AC claims to be quite student-driven. Being such a small school, I get the impression that it's more able to focus on students than medium-sized or large institutions. That said, are there any characteristics of AC's academics that you wish you could change (if you're currently attending)? What are your favorite things about the academics there? How are your professors? Are they open? Do they seem to care about students and about their subjects? Do they seem overloaded or are they constantly going above and beyond? What are your class sizes like?</p>

<p>The reason I ask this is because I'm pretty much down to AC and Baylor on my college list. Though I'm not big on Baylor's religiousness and I hear good things about AC's academics, I'm thinking Baylor may have some things to offer that only larger schools can (better lab equipment/computers, better relationships with outside organizations, etc.), and I'm getting $13,000 more a year in scholarships from Baylor than AC. What would your decision be? Help please!</p>

<p>Thanks,
Kenan</p>

<p>Hi,</p>

<p>Alot of the academic quality at AC depends on your major. If you're pre-med, then you can expect the larger 'weeding-out' classes (large meaning 30 or 40 people); if you survive those, then you can expect close relationships with your professors, research opportunities, etc. Something like 90% are accepted in med school, but keep in mind the number of pre-meds drops dramatically after freshman year, and after you get your ass kicked in classes like organic chemistry.</p>

<p>The humanities and social science departments are decent. If you are interested in anthropology then I would not recommend coming here, as there is only one professor and it's difficult to create an anthropology major.</p>

<p>You have the option of going 'above and beyond,' but I only see the top 5-7% of the school doing that. Pre-meds are always overloaded with work, otherwise it depends on your major. The smallness of your classes (never going above 50 besides large lectures) means that you can foster close relationships with your professors. </p>

<p>But the smallness of the school does have its drawbacks. There are not that many classes to choose from if you're more interested in interdisciplinary studies. The library never has the books I need for my research (but that's just a personal pet peeve). Sherman becomes BFE if you don't have a car. For me, the smallness of the school is oppressive, and that's one of the main reasons I've applied to transfer for next year.</p>

<p>Did you go to Roo Camp? Are you in the Leadership Institute? Please feel free to PM me if you have any questions. I can probably hook you up with another AC student who has a more positive outlook on this school :)</p>