Adopt another dog, or that's just nuts!?

<p>We already have 2 fairly large dogs, ages 2 and 6 (male and female, neutered). Today we were at the vet and someone had a foster dog who was just a love. I would have taken her home on the spot. I would never have thought I would even consider a THIRD dog. So now I'm wondering - do I call and say we might be interested if the other parties don't take her, or is that just nutso, plain and simple? </p>

<p>We have a 1/2 acre lot, an electric fence, and I'm home most of the time. OTOH, dogs 1 and 2 are eating us out of house and home, lol.</p>

<p>If it's a money issue, then no- it's not fair to the dog or to you. However, if you have the money, space, and the other dogs won't mind then no, not crazy at all! </p>

<p>We're foster parents and we've had (at times) 3-4 large pit bulls, rottweilers, etc roaming around our house. The more the better at times since they keep each other occupied and require less human play time!</p>

<p>Awww, go on, you know you want to!</p>

<p>We have four, two are rescues. I agree that if you have the time, money and space, it's wonderful to have another new furry friend. One thing that my vet usually reminds people is to be aware of the possibility of unexpected costs. It's nothing you can predict, obviously, but a sick dog can cost you a lot of $$. One of our dogs was recently very sick and with continued costs, we're currently approaching $7000 in veterinary bills. We're fortunate that we can afford it and weren't faced with the only option being to euthanize our beloved dog. We've had this dog since a pup so, of course, when you get a puppy, you imagine a life of costs (or you should!) but it's difficult to resist a cute face and a spur of the moment acquisition. We've always been successful at resisting those opportunities and gave careful thought to bringing a new dog into our home.</p>

<p>I echo the suggestion that it's almost always easier to have two dogs than it is to have one. More than two is wonderful, too, but it always depends on the dogs in question. I can't imagine ever again having only one. :) Good luck with your decision!</p>

<p>Total up how much more money you will be spending on food, medications, licenses, vet bills, pet sitting/boarding, crates, grooming etc. for yet another dog. Consider whether your family ever wants to go away for a couple of days on vacation and how much more boarding another dog will cost you. How many more hours a day you will be spending walking, interacting with the dog etc.</p>

<p>Then make the decision. Pet adoption should never be done on impulse.</p>

<p>Up until last year we had 5 rescue dogs, 2 kitties and 1 bunny. All rescues (daughter works in a vet hospital, 1 of the other docs has 11 rescue dogs!). Due to age and illnesses we now have 3 dogs and 1 kitty, very sad year at our home. 2 of the dogs are now over 15, and the remaining kitty is now 19. </p>

<p>The more the merrier was our family motto!! </p>

<p>Its like having kids, more than 2.....no real difference. (of course, I have 5 kiddos!)</p>

<p>Kat</p>

<p>I guess katwkittensdogsnbunnies was too long. Wife was just reading about the local Great Dane rescue with 250 dogs! Set me off on a rant about people who want a really cool giant dog and then figure out they can't take care of it, but actually I have no idea how or why the rescue organization has that many dogs.</p>

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I have no idea how or why the rescue organization has that many dogs.

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<p>Unfortunately, some "rescue" organizations are just fronts for animal hoarders. </p>

<p>I have two dogs and three cats and feel like I am at capacity. However, I would get another dog before I'd get a fourth cat!</p>