Adopted... Hispanic? :D

<p>Hi, my name is Steven and I'm adopted. I was adopted when I was an infant. My birth mother is Hispanic and my birth father Italian I hear... does that make me eligible to check off the Hispanic box on a college application?
Thanks</p>

<p>Yes it does, but be prepared to verify it if you get asked.</p>

<p>Thanks!
Think that it would help me to get in to schools more easily?
(I feel like I'm cheating) lol</p>

<p>
[quote]
Yes it does, but be prepared to verify it if you get asked.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I'm sorry but this comment is not correct for two reasons:</p>

<ol>
<li><p>The fact that a biological parent is Hispanic is not to sole determinate of Hispanic status. Please see the first post of the Definition sticky thread for the criteria used in college admissions.</p></li>
<li><p>Verification is used for some scholarships and special programs, but not generally to check URM status except for NA applicants.</p></li>
</ol>

<p>entomom,
Is it not correct that he could check off the Hispanic box (along with white of course)? That is what I was saying. Whether or not a school considers him hispanic would be an entirely different story I understand. But why would he not be able to check the Hispanic and white boxes (for origin) if a parent is Hispanic? Just trying to understand. Thanks! :)</p>

<p>stevenmbittner~
Even if you can technically check the box, it will not necessarily make it easier for you to get into schools UNLESS you have other things that you do that truly make you diverse for a campus. Like do you speak fluent Spanish, are you a Hispanic Scholar, are you actively involved in the Hispanic culture? There is alot more that goes into a school determining that you are a truly Hispanic URM than just the origin checked on the box(es).</p>

<p>OM2,
The point I was trying to get across to the OP is that the critical element is that the applicant 'self identify' as Hispanic. This is particularly important because while race is a biological trait, being Hispanic is an ethnicity and does not necessarily stem from biological parents with Hispanic backgrounds. [Sorry if I was not clear in my earlier statement, but I wanted the OP to read the Definition sticky thread ;).]</p>

<p>I'm not trying to say that the OP is or isn't Hispanic, only they can determine that. My point is that it does not absolutely follow that since one of the OPs biological biological parents is Hispanic that the OP self-identifies as Hispanic.</p>

<p>Fluency in Spanish is not always a good indicator of Hispanic identification due to various reasons, but you are correct that within the pool of Hispanic candidates, there are other factors such as involvement in the Hispanic community that influence how big a part being Hispanic will play in college admissions.</p>

<p>Just randomly going to state this. It's kind of irrelevent that they have a Hispanic option knowing that their is not such place as hispania. Lol I'm considered Hispanic but I find that option kind of unsmart.</p>

<p>Sent from my Desire HD using CC</p>

<p>Random and irrelevant, say no more :rolleyes:</p>

<p>I feel I need to clarify some things. First, one doesn't need to "verify" anything. If you say you're Hispanic, admissions takes you at your word. </p>

<p>Second, identifying as Hispanic doesn't necessarily mean you'll speak Spanish or that you identify with "Hispanic" culture, or even be involved in the Hispanic community.</p>

<p>My son does none of those things mentioned above but definitely identifies as being Puerto Rican (he's 1/2 Puerto Rican) rather than white even though we, his parents, are white.</p>

<p>Sometimes, things are not as simple as they seem.</p>

<p>okay since you are all on the adopted thread and I have looked around on cc this evening and can't find the answer to this question-what about a situation where you are white and adopted by a Latino family. Your surname is spanish and you identify with the Latino culture but you are blond and blue-eyed-can you check off Hispanic for that situation?</p>

<p>I thought I had read someplace on cc you could and I can't find it now. My DD's friend falls in that category and has asked for my advice. If anyone has the answer to that situation it would be appreciated.</p>

<p>I do speak fluent Spanish and I do love the language and culture. If you look on my other thread posted by me it tells all my ECs and academics :)
Steven</p>

<p>steven,
The question is not about language or what you like, the question is: when you think of yourself, do you consider yourself Hispanic?</p>

<p>This is for the general discussion, not specifically for the OP:</p>

<p>Adoption may complicate the question, but it is not the major determining factor in whether someone should mark Hispanic on college applications.</p>

<p>The key criteria is still whether or not you self-identify as Hispanic. Things such as appearance, surname and speaking Spanish have never been limiting factors.</p>

<p>Thanks entomom! I'm gonna bow out of this thread now. I'm in wayyyyy over my head! lol! ;)</p>

<p>I definitely do consider myself Spanish (de Puerto Rico y Espa</p>

<p>
[quote]
I definitely do consider myself Spanish

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Again, this is the only thing that matters.</p>

<p>Your name could have been McDonald, Chang, Goldman or Sorensen, surname does NOT matter.</p>

<p>Hi everyone. Haven't been here in a while...</p>

<p>itsv, that is a really good question. If we follow the logic of college applications and Hispanic/Latino is a self-identifying ethnicity regardless of race (and biology), it would seem that someone adopted by a Hispanic family could well self-identify as Hispanic regardless of biological background. Might also make for a very good essay topic for the application.</p>

<p>Hope you're all well.
cg</p>

<p>^Good to hear from you Cg! Hope you and your S are both doing well!</p>

<p>I think itsv's example is analogous to Alberto Fujimori and the other Asians that immigrated to S. American countries and are ethnically Hispanic.</p>

<p>Thanks copterguy and entomom-I clearly remember reading about the adopted by a hispanic family situation but can't find it know. Person I am helping wants to know if they can apply to summer scholarship programs that are directed for URMs. She explained her background and I was stumped. I know the question has been answered before I just can find it. </p>

<p>With school and everything I have been super busy. Hope everyone is doing well.</p>

<p>* If we follow the logic of college applications and Hispanic/Latino is a self-identifying ethnicity regardless of race (and biology), it would seem that someone adopted by a Hispanic family could well self-identify as Hispanic regardless of biological background. Might also make for a very good essay topic for the application.</p>

<p>*</p>

<p>I find this odd. I think if a kid is of one race/ethnicity and is adopted by another, he still is his original ethnicity.</p>

<p>If a White child is adopted by AA parents, I don't think he should be checking the AA box. That would seem unethical because of the potential admissions advantages.</p>