Advice for NYC

<p>So I have an internship in NYC this summer and I'm pretty much on my own and far from home for the first time.</p>

<p>I was wondering if anyone had advice in terms of not losing to much money from food costs. How do most people go about eating w.o cooking? Btw, I will be living in Manhattan area.</p>

<p>Learn how to cook.</p>

<p>treat lunch as your main meal (dinner) when you will eat with collegues - lunch is generally cheaper than dinner - then get a smaller take-out for supper back in your room...get breakfast bars or something easy for breakfast....hopefully you will at least have access to a small refrigerator so you can keep some food on hand. Good luck!</p>

<p>Street vendors sell fresh fruit very cheap all around manhattan and a bagel with cream cheese is a cheap (albeit high carb) choice that sticks with you a long time.</p>

<p>learn to cook is the first step. Buying lunch can really drive up a budget in NYC, most places try to get $10-15 from each person for lunch (selling soups, sandwiches, salads, etc.). Ask if you work has a cafeteria, it's often easier to eat cheaper there, though it's usually not the best food.</p>

<p>Save your money for special dinners out on the town.</p>

<p>Our you could always have Gomestar invite you over for dinner. When are you doing your braised pork medallions with roasted fennel and goat cheese in a reduced cider vinaigrette?</p>

<p>(That actually doesn't sound half bad for throwing four completely random things out there.)</p>

<p>but then I wouldn't have any food for lunch! </p>

<p>And if I'm doing goat cheese, I'd put it with beets rather than fennel. The sweet/tangyness inherent in beets and goat cheese would be ideal for a braise.</p>

<p>I'm not sure braising any kind of cheese would be ideal. :P </p>

<p>You could braise the pork medallions with the beets, then top the braised beets with a fennel slaw and a slice of goat cheese, and drizzle with an apple cider vinaigrette. Then make a jus li</p>

<p>
[quote]
You could braise the pork medallions with the beets, then top the braised beets with a fennel slaw and a slice of goat cheese, and drizzle with an apple cider vinaigrette. Then make a jus li</p>

<p>Oh man...what a terrible thread to stumble upon while I'm ravenously hungry!</p>

<p>yeah, braised cheese is not recommended. Usually for braising, the vegetables I serve the meat with are not the vegetables that were cooked with the meat. I don't like the flavor and texture loss, so I'd roast some beets separately (like I did last night but served with a Morel mushroom risotto). I'll be attempting the braised short ribs from Ad Hoc sometime, I just need to get a bigger cast iron pot first.</p>

<p>There's always Ben's Pizza and Papaya KIng.
But I would strongly suggest cooking.</p>

<p>for breakfast, go to Whole Foods in Union Square and load up on bagels or pastries. You can freeze bagels, too. You can also load up on fruit there, but avoid the expensive pre-cut stuff. It's easy enough to do yourself. Then, get some deli meats, they usually have good quality stuff and you can make a sandwich for only a few bucks. And their breads are good, too, no need for Wonderbread. Get a rotisserie chicken for $6, eat for dinner, then use the leftovers to make chicken salad.</p>

<p>Despite some stigmas, I find WF to be much higher in quality yet much lower in price than most NYC grocery stores. I actually save quite a bit of money by shopping at WF and not places like Food Emporium or Eli's.</p>

<p>You must not be shopping in the same grocery stores that I'm shopping in, because Whole Foods is where people on a budget in Manhattan don't shop. In fact, stop at the Farmers Market in Union Square to get better deals on fruits and vegetables.</p>

<p>And if you're going to get bagels in Manhattan, I wouldn't recommend Whole Foods (why go to a supermarket to buy bagels when you're in Manhattan?). Try a bagel store--for some reason, a baker's dozen at a bagel store in Manhattan is usually 14, not 13. Of course, the size of your freezer will dictate whether this is reasonable!</p>

<p>Other tricks: find some of the vending carts and purchase from them. They're inexpensive and some are very popular (they even tweet their location). Bring your lunch (as noted). You'll also find some places that have great values for meals (Hell's Kitchen area comes to mind) if you want to eat out.</p>

<p>And if all else fails, cereal for dinner every so often isn't bad!</p>

<p>
[quote]
You must not be shopping in the same grocery stores that I'm shopping in, because Whole Foods is where people on a budget in Manhattan don't shop.

[/quote]

Must be. But I do save money at Whole Foods. They key is to not load up on buckets at the olive bar or get roped in to bricks of English Stilton cheese. This will cause the bill to go up, one must shop smart. Still, I bought halibut fillets for $11 less per pound than I have found elsewhere. Lamb leg from New Zealand is $5.99 a pound at Whole Foods ... but lamb leg from Pennsylvania sold at Dean and Deluca is $14 a pound. At 6 to 8 pounds per leg, the savings can be huge.</p>

<p>
[quote]
fact, stop at the Farmers Market in Union Square to get better deals on fruits and vegetables.

[/quote]

agree, I have one farmer (as recommended by my restaurant friends) that I buy from exclusively and the quality is always as good as it gets.</p>

<p>Is this the Hotelies Unite thread?</p>

<p>Gomes and I are both ILRies. Chendrix is an engineer.</p>

<p>as an ILRie, I believe in the value of a well rounded education. Food and wine are part of a well rounded education.</p>

<p>Good engineers have marketable social skills, including an appreciation of food, wine, and the art of small talk.</p>

<p>Gomestar & CR2005, have you ever looked into a makeshift sous vide at home? I've read of using a food saver and a well temperature controlled pot to make some fantastic duck confit sous vide.</p>

<p>Sous vide can produce astonishing results. Sadly, an immersion circulator is something beyond my budget and well beyond my storage capacity. I've heard of the alternative methods that you speak of, but I'd have too much difficulty trying to maintain that narrow temperature window over a long period of time required for some dishes. Thomas Keller's book on the method is fantastic.</p>

<p>And if I really need something done sous vide, I know a good number of chefs that would help me out (and I know some ridiculous chefs)</p>

<p>There are some great sous vide videos on the Eleven Madison Park website. I eat there quite frequently as it is easily my favorite restaurant in NYC. Highly recommended.</p>

<p>and while jus li</p>