Anyone out there still deciding which university to attend?

<p>Making your final college choice is the final major step in the college admissions process, but it is by no means an easy one. The deadlines are approaching rapidly, as I'm sure you've all been hearing nonstop. So, this thread is designed to help students like me who are still indecisive on where to attend, and for anyone to give some last minute advice.</p>

<p>Some simple rules. . .for those posting their choices, try to include as many factors as possible, such as what region of the country you live in, what do you want to major in, etc. For those giving advice, please don't simply say "Go to Blah Blah U", but explain the choice by providing reasons. With that said, let us begin.</p>

<p>The universities I'm considering from the ones I got accepted to are:
Caltech
University of Pennsylvania (got into the dual degree program for Computer and Cognitive Science)
Duke
Cornell
Dartmouth
Johns Hopkins</p>

<p>Considerations:
- I live in Long Island, New York. Distance is a problem that could be overcome, but its still a big problem.</p>

<ul>
<li><p>Money, thankfully, isn't a concern. I'm not getting any real scholarships to any of these schools anyway -_- .</p></li>
<li><p>I'm interested in studying biology integrated with computer science. I feel that the computer is a virtually limitless tool that can be applied to the many important biological problems we have yet to solve. Likewise, a knowledge of biology helps one in the field of computer science as well, such as artifical intelligence, distributed intelligence, etc.</p></li>
<li><p>However, I'm not sure what profession I want to go into as yet.</p></li>
<li><p>Academics are the most important consideration. I would like a school that specializes in science and technology, but at the same time offers respectable courses in the other fields because I believe that one's education should be comprehensive. This is especially important for undergraduate studies.</p></li>
<li><p>I would prefer a moderately urban surrounding (such that there are always things to do nearby, but there isn't a lot of crime, for example), but I could make do anywhere.</p></li>
<li><p>Size isn't a big issue either because there's a trade off. I like big campuses because there's always something to do and people to meet as well as many resources to consult, but I like small campuses for their cohesive communities and personalized attention.</p></li>
<li><p>One thing is important though - I want the school name to be recognized by many. It may sound a little fickle, but I want people to be impressed when I say I went to "Blah Blah U", especially my employers. I worked hard for my education, after all.</p></li>
<li><p>Dorms are also important. Obviously, I want to get the cleanest and most spacious dorms possible. Campus appearance is also important to consider.</p></li>
</ul>

<p>Those are just the most basic of the considerations to be made, and already that's too much to think of, so any advice would be very appreciated. At least I truly believe there is no wrong choice here, which is why making a choice is so difficult.</p>

<p>(BTW: Post #100, yay)</p>

<p>I am deciding between Berkeley and Georgetown, and I am currently undecided in terms of major (though I know I want to do something that is humanities-related, NOT math or sciences).</p>

<p>Things about Georgetown:
-smaller classes
-more indivualized attention
-better "connections"
-more student/prof. interaction (=better recommendations)
-DC is pretty cool
-it does have a very good "name"</p>

<p>Things about Berkeley:
-bigger school (I would prefer smaller)
-that means bigger classes ( " )
-it is more competitive, and I don't really like being very competitive
-I would probably have more trouble getting good grades there
-I really like the campus, and I know I like the area (I don't really care that I already live like 10 minutes away)
-however, I got in for the SPRING semester
-I heard that the humanities (what I will study) at Cal are looked down upon (in the eyes of employers and grad schools)
-it is SO MUCH CHEAPER than Georgetown... and even though I could pay for Georgetown, if I went to Cal we would be saving close to 90,000 dollars (which could help pay for grad school)</p>

<p>ANY HELP? This is probably the hardest decision of my life. :(</p>

<p>money is something u can pay back later (take out loans, im sure gettin a good job out of georgetown wont be too hard), it seems like ur partial to georgetown and would thrive there. two of my friends got in to berk for the spring semester, and they have to take some ****ty classes (history of dinosaurs when shes majoring in business). anyways. i say go with g-town and love it.</p>

<p>besides money, all of your georgetown list were positives, while much of your Berkeley list were negatives. I think you have made the decision for yourself.</p>

<p>Chaoticcranium</p>

<p>My vote is for Johns Hopkins</p>

<p>Considerations:
- I live in Long Island, New York. Distance is a problem that could be overcome, but its still a big problem.</p>

<p>Baltimore is not that far from LI. Besides, the worst part of a trip from LI is getting off of LI. I think I spent half my life on the Belt Parkway.</p>

<ul>
<li>I'm interested in studying biology integrated with computer science. I feel that the computer is a virtually limitless tool that can be applied to the many important biological problems we have yet to solve. Likewise, a knowledge of biology helps one in the field of computer science as well, such as artifical intelligence, distributed intelligence, etc.</li>
</ul>

<p>Bio is Hopkins. or is it Hopkins is Bio.</p>

<ul>
<li>Academics are the most important consideration. I would like a school that specializes in science and technology, but at the same time offers respectable courses in the other fields because I believe that one's education should be comprehensive. This is especially important for undergraduate studies.</li>
</ul>

<p>Lots of "other" good departments at Hopkins.</p>

<ul>
<li>I would prefer a moderately urban surrounding (such that there are always things to do nearby, but there isn't a lot of crime, for example), but I could make do anywhere.</li>
</ul>

<p>Urban generally means more crime. Baltimore is no exception. It's good practice for the real world where most likely you aren't going to work in a small town in NH.</p>

<ul>
<li>One thing is important though - I want the school name to be recognized by many. It may sound a little fickle, but I want people to be impressed when I say I went to "Blah Blah U", especially my employers. I worked hard for my education, after all.</li>
</ul>

<p>no problem there</p>

<p>Calidan</p>

<p>My advice to you, based mostly on the spring semester admission to Berkeley, is to try Georgetown. If you don't like it, transfer. If you do like it, it's worth the money.</p>

<p>I'm between Columbia, Dartmouth, Rice, Wellesley, and William and Mary</p>

<p>Columbia: close to home (i live in CT), I'll definitely get a good education (I am somewhat attracted to the core, but I could live without it too), my sister went there and raves, but I think NY might be too big a city for me. I worry about how much a sense of campus community is to be found there. Also, they don't currently have a linguistics major (though i hear they're working on this)</p>

<p>Dartmouth: by far the best foreign language program of all. I went to a Drill practice, which was fun. Close enough to home (~3.5 hours by car). I attended some classes as well (a 100+ student lecture in which the teacher knew all the students' names, and an intimate 14 person seminar), loved them both. Worried social scene might be too drinking-oriented (I don't at all)</p>

<p>Rice: I sufficiently liked the academics. I love the residential college system (close, smaller communities within big, but def. not huge, school), and the fact that its near, but not really in, a good-sized city. The people I met at one of their programs were all very nice. Its also cheaper than C, D, or W. However, really really far. Being close to my family is really big for me. Also, I'm a New Englander - dunno if I could stand the heat / lack of winter.</p>

<p>Wellesley: the all-girls thing is neither a pro nor con for me - I don't really mind either way. I do like the cross-registration with MIT (awesome linguistics there). I love that its near Boston, and there are so many other schools in the area. I havent stayed overnight yet (tomorrow - kind of last minute, I know), but I went to a local reception and I was very impressed with all the women there. Also seemed like there was a very strong sense of community between the women, even after they'd graduated. Finally, it too is acceptably close to home</p>

<p>William and Mary - I got a ~$7k scholarship, meaning I'd pay about $13 per year. Also, I was accepted into their James Monroe scholars program, which comes with a $3k summer stipend, which past students have used to go abroad, do research, etc. I hear this program is very good. I am going down to VA Thursday (again, really really last minute), but other than that, I don't know that much about it. </p>

<p>So - I'm really down to the wire. I want to study languages (particularly german, but others too) and linguistics, and I fear I may spend my Saturday morning pulling a college name out of a hat.</p>

<p>Cubed,
My vote goes for Dartmouth. Best foreign language program, fun drill practice, good distance-wise, you enjoyed the classes and the familiarity of students/professors. As far as the drinking thing, I would check into whether there are shuttles to local malls/movies/bowling etc. for when you want to get away from it. Get into a routine with others where you have an alternative social life.</p>

<p>Strike Columbia, for the reasons you stated. </p>

<p>Strike Rice b/c you want to be close to your family. No matter what others may think of that as a valid reason or not, your feelings are always valid and there is no reason why you shouldn't be within driving distance of your family if you want to be. And being from CT originally, I think Texas would be rough weatherwise. There is nothing like fall and winter in New England. </p>

<p>Wellesley: see how you feel after your visit. Could be a close call between that and Dartmouth. I still vote for Dartmouth. </p>

<p>William and Mary will be a hike. Having done the I95/GWB trek a million times or so, I can't recommend it.</p>

<p>Calidan, go with your gut. It's painfully apparent in your list that you prefer Georgetown due to the individual attention. I wouldn't throw out Berkeley just because it has bigger class size. They say that many professors actually encourage students to come into their office for help or to help with research. You can get close to professors if you have the initiative. But if you really prefer Georgetown, don't let money be the deciding factor. Scholarships and jobs are always available.</p>

<p><em>bump</em>
Gotta still be plenty of people out there who haven't decided yet. . .</p>

<p>(like me <em>sigh</em> . . .)</p>