Application GPA

<p>Hi,</p>

<p>Does anyone know about the average GPA that the applicants got? Is that like 3.7?</p>

<p>no idea, but i'd emphasize that cumulative gpa probably isnt as important as the gpa in the most recent semesters. which i expect would have to be near perfect</p>

<p>I'm sure it was at least a 3.0 as that is the minimum to apply. :P I think the applicants GPA's are weighed against other factors such as the life story, etc. i.e. you could have a 3.3 and talk about dodging bullets in Iraq and have imho have a decent shot.</p>

<p>Again, just my opinion :)</p>

<p>Make sure that you don't have a "D" in any of your classes, or more than 3-"B's" in your classes. The admission officers are VERY picky when it comes to grades, even if it is above a 3.5 GPA overall. While your essays, class work, recommendations, and test scores are important, the admission officers want to see at least a 3.7+ GPA and Test Scores in the 90th percentile. Anything less than that is a rejection(which is quite bias) in my opinion.</p>

<p>What do you base that opinion on..?</p>

<p>wow redlinekid2. interesting.
let's just hope that your analysis is inaccurate.</p>

<p>and for the record, how does an objective standard such as the one you described support the typical "non traditional student"? in many cases "non traditional" equates to a period of non-traditional grades/behaviors/circumstances/etc, right?</p>

<p>not that Columbia is looking for typical students. but I can’t imagine one D or three B's could really be the end of your chances in a school that is specifically geared for non-traditional students, provided you prove yourself, whether through recent grade improvement, the essay or with test grades.</p>

<p>Additionally I have to link to this site (In the Selection of Students box) which directly contradicts some of your claims:</p>

<p>Columbia</a> University, School of General Studies Admissions Information - CollegeData College Profile</p>

<p>Just because you got a D and more then three B's does not mean that it is a rule of admission at General Studies. The Admissions Officers I spoke with a month or so ago basically contradicted everything you just said as well.</p>

<p>Yeah, totally agree with the last two posters. i think some below-A grades in admitted students' pasts are fairly common, hence making sub 3.5 cumulative GPA's common as well. i think the most recent coursework and coursework in the intended field of study are weighted much more heavily</p>

<p>When I applied for admissions in 2006, my application was rejected on the basis of having 6-B's and 1-D on my academic transcript. The 12 remaining grades that I got were all A's, along with a strong essay and recommendations. According to the admissions officer that I had spoken to concerning my rejection application, I was also told that my application essay was excellent. However, my GSAE scores were in the upper mid-range, which meant that I passed the test; but not the top-tier scores that they expect. In conclusion, I was told that Columbia GS expects their applicants to have straight "A's" on their academic record, which made me very angery. I was never given an opportunity to obtain provisional status that would had allowed me the chance to prove that I could manage the school's academic program. This is my personal experience from speaking to the admissions officer who replied to my phone message regarding my rejection letter.</p>

<p>I apologize things did not work out for you.</p>

<p>It is important to note / ask some things.
1) 5 years is a long time and the world, much less Columbia has probably changed in many ways.
2) Did you explain why you got all those B's and a D? Further, did you retake any of those classes and get a higher grade?
3) Were you taking a rigorous / varied courseload?</p>

<p>In summary, I think there is more to your case then just getting a bad grade or two and getting rejected. Nor do I believe "straight A's" are required to get into GS as evidenced by the Admission Statistics website provided which displayed GPA's as low as 3.3 and SAT scores down to 1330 getting accepted. (Granted I'm sure they had exceptional situations to warrant a low score in one category or perhaps the rest of their package was just that overwhelming.)</p>

<p>I am currently sitting in Butler Library on the 4th floor studying for midterms as a recently enrolled GS student. After perusing this forum as a mere spectator I now feel inclined to address the GPA admissions "standard." I was accepted this past spring and my overall cumulative GPA was hardly a 3.7</p>

<p>Here's my stats, in a nut shell:</p>

<p>Poor HS grades
2001-2003: Went to a small liberal arts college in NYC and got dismissed with a 1.8 GPA (35 units)</p>

<p>Long Break</p>

<p>2008-2010: 3.96 GPA (58 units)</p>

<p>I'm not sure what my cumulative GPA was, but I wrote strong essay's (both the autobiography and the extra optional essay), had great recs., and felt so-so about the GSAE exam.</p>

<p>I thoroughly explained my previous collegiate endeavor and was accepted without even having to do an interview. Its all about the essay and recent grade performance in my humble opinion.</p>

<p>It's interesting to hear, I think the most important word you mentioned is 'recent'. They don't focus on overall achievement as much as on recent academic rigor.</p>

<p>I've been visiting Columbia GS in January, and from what I felt out of the people I was talking with, is that the three major things they are looking for is 1. Recent academic excellence 2. Essay/Life Experience.</p>

<p>It is an Ivy league school, therefore they do expect us to apply with some challenging courses and above average performance.</p>

<p>Thanks a lot for posting that, Tsar10027...i can't tell you how encouraged I am by that story</p>

<p>I'm glad I could help. Just make sure you spend a lot of time crafting a great essay. They want to hear your story, and why that story works for GS specifically. Good luck, but just know that if your accepted and you decide to enroll here, it is no joke. They throw you right into the fire. I would advise taking University Studies, its a class Columbia offers on how to succeed here. Get familiar with culpa.info, as it will provide much needed insight on classes/profs.</p>

<p>I'm going to take issue with a few things redline wrote:</p>

<p>"Make sure that you don't have a "D" in any of your classes, or more than 3-"B's" in your classes."</p>

<p>Well, that's pretty specific. I think you'll meet plenty of people who have successfully matriculated with Bs and, YIKES, Ds on their transcripts. It happens. And, usually when an applicant can otherwise demonstrate a keen intellectually ability, some grades can be mitigated.</p>

<p>"While your essays, class work, recommendations, and test scores are important, the admission officers want to see at least a 3.7+ GPA and Test Scores in the 90th percentile. Anything less than that is a rejection(which is quite bias) in my opinion."</p>

<p>This just isn't true. All criteria, even grades and test scores, are considered as part of GS's holistic application process. </p>

<p>"When I applied for admissions in 2006, my application was rejected on the basis of having 6-B's and 1-D on my academic transcript."</p>

<p>Typically, admissions officers don't do post-decision counseling to tell an applicant where they underperformed. If they do this at GS, it'll be the first I've ever heard of it.</p>

<p>"However, my GSAE scores were in the upper mid-range, which meant that I passed the test; but not the top-tier scores that they expect."</p>

<p>I didn't take this exam. But, like any other standardized test, there is no pass/fail number.</p>

<p>"I was told that Columbia GS expects their applicants to have straight "A's" on their academic record, which made me very angery."</p>

<p>That's simply not true. I didn't have straight As. In fact, I know few who have.</p>

<p>Always good to hear people attending GS step in to set the record straight :)</p>

<p>Hellojan,
My comments are from personal experiences with the Admissions Office at that time. They seemed to singled out my class grades and GSAE test results as the reason for denying me admission. The person I spoke to said that my essay and recommendations were excellent. If that was the case, why was I rejected outright? If they had any doubts about my academic abilities, they could have allowed me to enroll in a few class on a provisional basis. Some of the classes that enroll in at my former college were honors classes and courses that prepared me for the challenges of GS academic program. However, the standards for Community College students might be a lot higher than a 3.5GPA. I worked very hard in all of my classes because I wanted to prepare myself for the challenges that are expected of me at a 4-Year University.</p>

<p>For some reason your name rung a bell redlinekid2 and now I remember why. I've seen you post on another board (Princeton) that a "D" is the kiss of death. You keep spreading these misconceptions on boards and other posters almost immediately stand up and say you are wrong. (Such as in this thread.) </p>

<p>Here are two other things I saw from your posts:</p>

<p>1) You continually mention in many of your posts that at least a 3.7GPA is required to get into GS followed with your post here that you had a 3.5GPA. Yet, you do not understand why you were rejected..?</p>

<p>2) I saw your course load posted as well:</p>

<p>Fall 2000
English Composition I (Honors) Grade: A
Intro. to Astronomy Grade: A
Intro. to Religion Grade: A
World History (Honors) Grade: A</p>

<p>Spring 2001
English Composition II (Honors) Grade: B
Intro. to Philosophy (Honors)Grade: B
Honors Seminar Grade: A
Intro. to Sociology(Honors) Grade: A</p>

<p>Spring 2003
College Algebra Grade: B
World Literature Grade: A
Intro. to Psychology Grade: B
Earth Sciences Grade: W</p>

<p>Fall 2004
Muli-Ethnic America Grade: A
The Humanities Grade: A
Literature and Culture Grade: B
Social Environment Grade: A</p>

<p>Spring 2005
World History Grade: A
Social Problems Grade: A
Political Philosophy Grade: B
Intro. to Logic Grade: D </p>

<p>In my opinion, this is not a rigorous course load. It also gives a dimmer view of your 3.5GPA. This coupled with spending nearly 5 years on your degree, your gaps between semesters (some up to 2 years), an essay you posted mentioning your learning difficulties along with the low Intro. to Logic grade would make it more clear why the GS Admissions committee would hesitate at extending admission.</p>

<p>Please stop going around CC and worrying people that a single low grade or some "B"s will kill our chances for a top level education. It is simply not true and we worry enough already.</p>

<p>If it helps ease anyone's mind that might be looking at this thread: I had an F and a W in my first semester at college (2005). I went back to school in 2008 and achieved a 3.9 over 60 units and was admitted to GS. The key word in this thread is "recent" - that's what matters GPA-wise, as well as your essay and overall story.</p>