Are the SAT II subject tests intelligence or effort?

<p>Do the SAT II test pure intelligence or how much effort you put into studying for them? My brother (who attends Cornell) said that it tests how you can critically problem-solve-- for example, the math level II isn't just straight forward material; you have to apply what you know to solve the hard problems. Is this true?</p>

<p>For MathII, your brother may be right. However, if you does sample tests, you will be at an advantage.</p>

<p>For other tests as US History, Chemistry, and Biology, it's straight up effort. The more you know, the higher your score.</p>

<p>Heavily tied into the AP curriculum as well. if you've taken AP classes such as History and English you will be used to thenm.</p>

<p>They are achievement tests and, thus, test effort more than intelligence. </p>

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for example, the math level II isn't just straight forward material; you have to apply what you know to solve the hard problems.

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<p>My impression is the exact opposite: Math Level 2 seems very straightforward.</p>

<p>Subject tests are all effort. the SAT is intelligence-but for like history for example- its all about how much you put in. it can defintely be advatnaageuos</p>

<p>For science and math tests, they are very straightforward. You need some basic knowledge and that's it. So basically its intelligence.
for history, you need knowledge, but you can substitute intelligent guessing if you go pretty fast and have time for it.</p>

<p>For Math II, I would say neither intelligence nor effort... all you need to know is how to use your graphing calculator... or not even, use some hidden functions of scientific calculator.</p>

<p>And well, other things differ greatly depending on which subject it is. E.g. literature requires "naturals" (imo) that can get into the lit-nerd mind. But things like physics, as long as you practice, it's not hard (esp. 'cause it's got a generous curve)</p>