Asian representation in the upper echelons of employment/life

<p>Note: I posted this here as well because the CC cafe is apparently dead.
I figured that as the grown-ups that most of you are, you might have some actual experience with this particular phenonmenom (sp).</p>

<p>If mods want to delete either of the two, please delete the one in the original cafe.</p>

<p>Sorry for violating any Terms of Service, if I had done so.</p>

<p>Disclaimer: I want to make it clear that I'm neither demeaning nor exalting Asians.</p>

<p>Pardon my ignorance throughout.</p>

<p>One of the many observations I have made in my limited observation of the world is that Asians are poorly represented in exactly the title says they are poorly represented in.</p>

<p>-Besides Citigroup, I don't remember the last time I saw an Asian CEO of a non-Asian company.</p>

<p>-We have never had an Asian SC judge.</p>

<p>-Have we ever had any Asian HR's or Senators?</p>

<p>-The only clients going to Asian law firms are Asian themselves.</p>

<p>-Actors, actresses, singers, musicians--entertainers in general.</p>

<p>-Asian-sounding last names popping up as authors or editors in NYT articles are very rare.</p>

<p>Supposedly, Africans Americans received a big break with President Obama's victory, that it was a giant step for ecumenicalists. But is it really true? Have we as a nation moved towards greater unity, or is that only true in regards to the historic black-white struggle?</p>

<p>Are Asians truly 400 years behind African Americans in achieving equality?</p>

<p>Considering they are of a race that makes up such a great percentage of the upper stratums of education and academia, what I have listed above must be at least a little surprisingly to most if not all of you.</p>

<p>Surely not are Asians are heading into college as pre-med participants or biology majors in hopes of becoming doctors and dentists?</p>

<p>Even in that field, only 1 of the 6 doctors/dentists I have been to in the past year or so has been Asian. No I don't get sick a lot; I just, oh nvm. </p>

<p>Is it because they are gauche? Myopic--in both senses of the word(lol)? Inept??!</p>

<p>Here you go:</p>

<p>Business</a> & Technology | Why haven't Asians scaled corporate heights? | Seattle Times Newspaper</p>

<p>FYI, there is a Parents' Cafe - it is pretty active.</p>

<p>Have we ever had any Asian HR's or Senators?</p>

<p>do governors count?
How about the current Secretary of Commerce?</p>

<p>EK, you killed two birds with one stone ;)</p>

<p>No governors do not count because their rises to their respective positions are localized.</p>

<p>Louisiana's election of an Asian governor does not mean that we as a country have achieved equality for all.</p>

<p>As for the SoC, no, that does not count either because secretaries are appointed.</p>

<p>Naming one or two exceptions does not disprove what I have said; the fact still remains that they are, dare I say, underrepresented.</p>

<p>That article doesn't do more than restate the problem and offer one interviewee's vague suggestion of a remedy.</p>

<p>Also, are the distinct demarcations within the Asian race relevant? e.g. South Asian, East Asian, etc. </p>

<p>fix up of original post:
[quote]
phenonmeno*n*

[/quote]
I swear it was a typo.</p>

<p>
[quote]
poorly represented in exactly what the title says they are poorly represented in.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>
[quote]
Are Asians truly 400 years behind African Americans in their quest to achiev*e* equality?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>
[quote]
Surely not all Asians are heading into college

[/quote]
</p>

<p>"While East Asian cultures and educational systems tend to encourage technical excellence and respect for authority, they may not do as good a job developing leadership and communication skills, Gee and Hom say."</p>

<p>I think it's summed up pretty well in the article. Blacks were at a MUCH greater disadvantage than Asians have ever been. Right now it seems to be a cultural attitude that needs to change in the community itself.</p>

<p>What about the East Asian that had been educated in American educational systems for the entirety of his life?</p>

<p>Well, as an Asian, I'll leave a few remarks. Most who go to the USA do it for development in technical areas. Most of the asians I know have a strong cultural connection to their country of origin (regardless of where they were born) so those who look for connections, etc just stick it out in Asia since building a network in the West won't help you (many asians stay in the west until after college or work a few years and then head back). I'll pose the reverse question too: why do you never non-asian heads of asian firms (ibanks etc don't count, contrary to popular belief they're actually small fry compared to the domestic market)? The issue is more of a cultural one. In Asia, to rise to the top, you can't be quite as aggressive as you'll be seen as unreliable. There's also more empasis on education (some banks require their top execs to have phds). In the West, the advantage is reversed.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Surely not are Asians are heading into college as pre-med participants or biology majors in hopes of becoming doctors and dentists?

[/quote]

Both my doctor and my dentist are Asian. One of my former bosses was Asian - a high level executive.</p>

<p>
[quote]
-Have we ever had any Asian HR's or Senators?

[/quote]
Dan Inouye - Senator from Hi.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Are Asians truly 400 years behind African Americans in achieving equality?

[/quote]
No. Why would you think they don't already have equality? How do you define it? Do you think they're being repressed due to their race?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Surely not are Asians are heading into college as pre-med participants or biology majors in hopes of becoming doctors and dentists?

[/quote]
I don't know where you're located but regional demographics plays a role in this.</p>

<p>"I'll pose the reverse question too: why do you never non-asian heads of asian firms (ibanks etc don't count, contrary to popular belief they're actually small fry compared to the domestic market)?"</p>

<p>Sony</a> USA - Howard Stringer</p>

<p>Here is one non-Asian CEO of a reputable Asian firm who needs to be fired because their products have gone from being "cream of the crop" to "total crap".</p>

<p>
[quote]
Naming one or two exceptions does not disprove what I have said; the fact still remains that they are, dare I say, underrepresented.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Regional demographics? By country or by state within the U.S.?</p>

<p>
[quote]
How do you define it? Do you think they're being repressed due to their race?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Not in the obvious ways as discrimination was applied to African Americans, but, some study done a few years ago on the old SAT indicated that to admission committees, being Asian was equivalent to an 150 point deduction.</p>

<p>Asians are commonly perceived as pedantic (as if it were bad thing) and gauche. Are they not as aggressive? Perhaps, but is it out of culture? </p>

<p>Culture is inured in its suscribers, so, with great effort, it can also be excavated. While some people may be born with naturally aggressive personalities, I'm can't imagine why aggressiveness cannot be a skill that can be acquired; I doubt that it is a quality that one must possesss in the greatest amount possible--being above a certain threshold may suffice.</p>

<p>Also: are Asian accents bad? In my past (so as some may say, I'm already jumping to hasty generalizations if I am referencing my past and only my past), I have met very few Asians-Americans whom I was not able to pinpoint their race solely based on their voices. Again, not to demean, but it's not as euphonic as what I wish I could've described them as.</p>

<p>That either means one of two things:</p>

<ol>
<li>That I have absolutely no idea what I'm talking about</li>
</ol>

<p>or</p>

<ol>
<li>That accents also elicit negative opinions from employers and colleges.</li>
</ol>

<p>
[quote]
"I'll pose the reverse question too: why do you never non-asian heads of asian firms

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Why do they what?</p>

<p>Lastly, in regards to the entertainment industry: </p>

<p>I don't think the lack of Asians in the entertainment industry can be ascribed to a reason as a crude as "they don't possess the acting skills necessary," because there are entertainers that cater to Asian media markets. Is it simply a matter of differing tastes, and if so, are the strictures solely based on aesthetics and phonaesthetics?</p>

<p>Is it possible that, as Asian-Americans, the youth lack a precedent to reference to? Does the absence of an exemplary figure discourage Asian-American youths from pursuing that specific industry? Cycles must be broken somewhere, but where? How? When?</p>

<p>Sorry for all the questions. I'm asking because I don't know the answers to them.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I'll pose the reverse question too: why do you never non-asian heads of asian firms

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Usually, non-Asians never master an Asian language well enough to be culturally integrated at the highest levels of an Asian corporation.</p>

<p>18 till i die yeaow</p>

<p>
[quote]
I'll pose the reverse question too: why do you never non-asian heads of asian firms

[/quote]
</p>

<p>CEO of Nissan.</p>

<p>There certainly have been a number of Representatives and Senators from Hawaii who are of Asian ancestry. (Senators Hiram Fong, Spark Matsunaga, Dan Inouye, Reps Spark Matsunaga, Patsy Mink, Pat Saiki, Mazie Hirono). Many corporations in Hawaii have been headed by people of Asian ancestry, for example: Connie Hee Lau is CEO of Hawaiian Electric Industries, the state's electric utility. I'm sure there are many others.</p>

<p>From California, S.I. Hayakawa was a U.S. Senator, while in the current congress California has a number of Asian-American Representatives: Matsui, Honda, Chu.</p>

<p>I will shed some light on Chinese because I can't speak for other Asians. Chinese are into making money in the US. How much do HR or judges make? As far as going into politics, forget about it! It's a thankless job. A writer for NY Times? Not a profession too many Chinese parents are going to encourage their kids to do (your starve before you get one article published). Actors/Actresses? They are considered to be lowest profession in China. You do that when you have no skill/education, and only have a face/body to earn a living. </p>

<p>Most Chinese (or Asians) I know work in Wall Street, own their business, are doctors, lawyers, programmers. They are all doing things that require a specific skill, so they couldn't be displaced because of their race or language problem.</p>

<p>If you look it from the economic side, you'll find the Chinese has higher income relative to many Americans and URM. At my kid's private school, which charges $35,000 for tuition, there are a lot more Asians (% wise) than whites or URMs. If you go to any top tier universities, there are higher % of Asians than any other race. In the next 10 to 20 years, education is going to play an even a greater part of "haves and have nots." With that economic power, you will see more Asians in politics.</p>

<p>^^Agree with oldfort. Remember the immigration restrictions placed on Asians well into the 20th century? Many of the parents are still working the "first generation" jobs such as restaurant owners and dry cleaners. They are the ones footing the bills for their college students. The influx of Asian students into higher education will change this.</p>

<p>Does anyone else think OP is writing a paper?</p>

<p>At my current student's school the Asians tend to self segregate.....Latinos, whites and AAs mingle much more. This is a bit of a disappointment to her. She has been to China and hopes to someday return to "make a difference" in an impoverished rural area there.</p>

<p>It takes time. Just look at the Jews in this country. It takes quite sometimes for them to become mainstream, then onto the top of many professions. I suppose we're talking about Americans of Asian heritage (Asian Americans). Otherwise, I would be worried for the furture of this country. I don't want a bunch of Asians running America. I am sure no Japanese would like to see a bunch of Americans running their cournty either.</p>

<p>
[quote]
She has been to China and hopes to someday return to "make a difference" in an impoverished rural area there.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I don't think there are that many impoverished rural area in China.</p>