Asia's too big

<p>Quite frankly, Asia is too big and diverse to be considered one continent. Its boundaries encompass all the world's major religions, as well as a plethora of ethnic diversity. Turkey can't get into Europe because they're too Muslim and a tad dark-skinned, yet everybody in Asia's supposed to have some kind of collective identity? I find that it is an extreme case of Eurocentrism, where after you organize the all-important identities and cultures of the Europeans, it really doesn't matter where the rest of the world goes, hence the hodge-podge world that is Asia.</p>

<p>Yea, that's about right. I admit it, all the white people got together last Saturday and lumped all the brown people into a giant, continuous landmass so we wouldn't have to worry about categorizing them all. Too bad somebody figured us out! Good going, chief...call CNN and let them in on your scoop.</p>

<p>Umm...then what's Siberia all about?</p>

<p>Siberia isn't part of Europe. Only a small western portion of Russia is part of Europe.</p>

<p>virtuoso, that apparently went way over your head. And then you further proved his point about Russia.</p>

<p>North America's huge and diverse. There's Mexico and Cuba and that whole area. Then Canada, and America, with ~65% whites only.</p>

<p>Continent is a geographic term. It has nothing to do with ethnography.</p>

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North America's huge and diverse. There's Mexico and Cuba and that whole area. Then Canada, and America, with ~65% whites only.

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<p>People usually refer to the sub-Mexican countries that are north of South America as Central America, but is that considered North America? I'm not quite sure.</p>

<p>I never heard of the continent of Central America:) Couldn't find the word, but yeah, continents are based on georgraphy, not people or size.</p>

<p>[q]virtuoso, that apparently went way over your head. And then you further proved his point about Russia.[/q]</p>

<p>What are you talking about?</p>

<p>

<a href="http://www.only-maps.com/europe-map.jpg%5B/img%5D"&gt;http://www.only-maps.com/europe-map.jpg

</a></p>

<p>I don't see all of Russia being included in Europe.</p>

<p>race is a political construct.</p>

<p>did you know that Arabs were considered Asians, now they're considered whites.</p>

<p>Mexicans were also considered whites in the 1920's but are now classified as Hispanic.</p>

<p>Any continent is diverse. Africa has whites (in the north) and black people everywhere else. Asia isn't the only one that has aton of different people.</p>

<p>I had no idea that Arabs were considered Asians before. I didn't know that they were white either. They're caucasian I think (but I think that caucasian and white are the same thing, right?)</p>

<p>I think the big races in the world are Asians, Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, Middle Easterners, Indians.</p>

<p>As a previous poster said...a continent is a geographic term - not a political one. it just has to do with where the tectonic plates are.</p>

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As a previous poster said...a continent is a geographic term - not a political one. it just has to do with where the tectonic plates are.

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<p>Europe and Asia are both on the Eurasian plate, while India and Arabia have their own plate. So no, it cannot be based on the tectonic plates.</p>

<p>
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I think the big races in the world are Asians, Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, Middle Easterners, Indians.

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<p>I would agree, except I would not use the word "race" and use instead the term "cultural" or "political". Why? Because out of the 6 you mention, 4 of them can be considered Caucasian: Whites, Hispanics, Middle Easterners, and Indians. Yet they're of a separate race? Only because of human factors such as culture and politics. There is nothing racially, meaning genetically predetermined, about any of those groups, except for maybe some minor superficial features.</p>

<p>nbachris,</p>

<p>I know it's hard to imagine that the term "Asia" isn't some sort of white conspiracy to keep down the rest of the world, but some of the terminology arose out of convention.</p>

<p>I hate to break it to all the "it's all Euro-centrism"-types, but the term Asia is in use in Asia as well.</p>