Automatic acceptance?

<p>UC</a> Admissions</p>

<p>I did this with my ACT scores and subject test scores in Math 2 and Chemistry, and it scored to a 450. They said a minimum 425 for nonresidents, so does that mean I'm automatically accepted to Berkley?</p>

<p>Wow I'm curious about this as well. I have a 432.</p>

<p>No, it means you're accepted to Riverside or Merced -__-
Do you really think Berkeley would just accept high test scorers?</p>

<p>You're right. That was a pretty stupid assumption.</p>

<p>They never gave any details :(</p>

<p>Yeah, I figured it was too good to be true. From what I heard, this one dude got a 2320 on his SAT and an 800 on his math 1 and 2 subject test and got waitlisted at Berkley.</p>

<p>@Handlebars: Did you get that from intuition or actual facts?</p>

<p>it is actual fact that the high scores just guarantee a spot at one of the UCs, not at all of them. In practice, that means the two mentioned.</p>

<p>Facts AND intuition.
A friend of mine got 2360 SAT, 2 x 800 SAT II and only got waitlisted to Berkeley, didn't get into UCLA.
And ELC kids don't even get automatic acceptance to Cal/UCLA/UCSD. You only get acceptance to places like Merced and Riverside
And if you think about it, why the heck would they want some nerd who's only good at taking tests? Admission to top colleges is about extracurriculars and the overall quality of an applicant, not some numbers. Otherwise it would be like China where everyone puts all their effort into this one test that determines their fate.</p>

<p>Well, they would probably automatically accept someone who got a perfect score on a USABO or USAMO test... no matter how nerd-ish.</p>

<p>In other words, the numbers have to be REALLY good. </p>

<p>But I get the point. Alright then. UC should put that up there to stop confusing all of these berkley applicants!</p>

<p>One bit of advice: stop misspelling Berkeley. It's plastered all over these forums, there's no excuse.</p>

<p>If you've been careful enough, you would have also realized that the website is for the whole University of California system. IIRC, if you dig further in the FAQs, it mentions that only a spot in the UC system is guaranteed, but preferred campus is not. That is, if you only apply to UC Berkeley and do not get accepted, by basis of the criteron, they will offer you a spot at another UC (most likely either Riverside or Merced, but you don't get the choice).</p>

<p>Sorry to be harsh, but that's a reality check for you. If you don't start catching these things yourself, you will be in for a really harsh college experience, especially at places with lots of red tape, like UC Berkeley.</p>

<p>RockyChen - Cal admissions are holistic and definitely NOT driven by the stats alone. No score, no matter how high, is going to guarantee you get in. It is not a numbers driven process.</p>

<p>Just like other top ranked schools, you need some pretty decent stats to be considered, but on the other hand there are people accepted here with not so impressive stats because they have other factors that are outstanding.</p>

<p>@ExcellBlue:</p>

<p>
[quote]

One bit of advice: stop misspelling Berkeley. It's plastered all over these forums, there's no excuse.</p>

<p>If you've been careful enough, you would have also realized that the website is for the whole University of California system. IIRC, if you dig further in the FAQs, it mentions that only a spot in the UC system is guaranteed, but preferred campus is not. That is, if you only apply to UC Berkeley and do not get accepted, by basis of the criteron, they will offer you a spot at another UC (most likely either Riverside or Merced, but you don't get the choice).</p>

<p>Sorry to be harsh, but that's a reality check for you. If you don't start catching these things yourself, you will be in for a really harsh college experience, especially at places with lots of red tape, like UC Berkeley.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Well, Firefox screwed me with their spelling correction thing :).</p>

<p>I did notice that, which is why I'm wondering if they would accept people for all UC campuses.</p>

<p>I did not dig that far...</p>

<p>Well, I kind of figured it was too good to be true (I know someone who got a 2320 and got waitlisted at berkely with an 800 in math 1 and 2). I just wanted an explanation.</p>

<p>Also, I researched Riverside and Merced, and assuming the person did half decent in school (and really, even if they didn't), if they had the capacity to get a 425 (based on UC calculation), they should be able to get into Riverside or Merced regardless of the UC calculation or not.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Cal admissions are holistic and definitely NOT driven by the stats alone. No score, no matter how high, is going to guarantee you get in. It is not a numbers driven process.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Well, if you REALLY want to go to the extreme... If you get a perfect score at a USABO or USNCO or USAMO olympiad at nationals.... (well, for USNCO, internationals....).</p>

<p>You keep wanted to believe that at some score on some test, it is a 100% lock. No amount of counter logic or evidence seems to dissuade you. All the evidence of people with 2400 SATs being rejected from Ivies and other top schools to the contrary, you want the comfort of a sure thing. </p>

<p>Good luck with that in the college admissions process. You can have very good odds with great stats, but the system has a way of proving there are no guarantees.</p>

<p>Clearly, you don't understand the difference between the SAT and national olympiads.
Furthermore, he is merely posting it as a hypothetical.</p>

<p>Past 19 years, 9 USAMO perfect scorers</p>

<p>Past 19 years, ~6000 SAT perfect scores</p>

<p>SAT perfect scores don't indicate much.</p>

<p>It is still looking for faith that there is some absolute guarantee. </p>

<p>Are you saying that no person with a perfect USAMO score was rejected by any college they applied to? Inexplicable rejections and waitlists are part of the admissions process. </p>

<p>Extremely, hugely likely to be accepted? Sure. Guaranteed? No. </p>

<p>Sending in just one application because of faith in a sure-thing yes is risky, even for the best candidates.</p>

<p>There are only 9 people who got perfect USAMOs so the chance that they got accepted everywhere is great. Probably only two got it before college applications though. </p>

<p>De facto guaranteed</p>

<p>You can say RSI is not a guarantee for MIT. But that would not be accurate. Only one RSI alumnus has been rejected from MIT but you can still call it a lock. Obviously, certain factors can make you lose your spot no matter how qualified(i.e. criminal record)</p>

<p>And it isn't looking for faith because there is no way anyone looking at this thread is getting a perfect score on a national olympiad</p>

<p>@Entropy</p>

<p>Please explain RSI.</p>

<p>@Rider</p>

<p>Also, if I were looking for faith, I would have gotten a perfect score or at least placed in a national competition (and if I did, I would not be worrying about the 425 scale thing, as Entropy states). </p>

<p>Oh, I did not get a 2400 or a 36, just so you know.</p>

<p>I was being hypothetical, just to argue really. :) (but you started it!)</p>

<p>RSI is a highly competitive summer program at MIT. Being in RSI is more competitive than getting into MIT and makes MIT a safety. Only 1 RSI alumnus got rejected and it was because they caused problems.</p>

<p>Is it USNCO competitive, or even more so?</p>

<p>Well, yeah. Understandably, if I was the best applicant in the world and applied to a tier 4 school and in my essay wrote, </p>

<p>"The reason I'm applying to this school is because it was a free application and so I can get 50 acceptances and 0 rejections. Oh, and I hope you don't mind me smoking weed there."</p>

<p>I'm pretty sure a college will send me a rejection letter, or at least a waitlist.</p>

<p>Oh, and a comment on USAMO. </p>

<p>WTC?!?!?!?!?! I looked at their questions for the national exam and I didn't even know how to start them. And I consider myself good at math.</p>