BACS or BSCS

<p>BACS or BSCS
Okay i started out college as a math major but decided i did not want to go to grad school and there are not many jobs for a math major so i deiced to switch to computer science i have a problem. I want to take the BSCS but it will keep me in college an extra year and i do not have the money for it, or i could take the BACS and graduate on time. Does the BACS not as competitive as the BSCS, will i not be able to get any good jobs, or will i not be able to work in the engineering or sciences firms? will i strictly be business or something not technical? Both degrees are awarded form the college of engineering, the BSCS is ABET certified but the BACS is not. I have listed the programs courses and requirements below.</p>

<p>BACS
I. COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGR COURSES
(78 Hrs.)
A. Required Computer Science Courses
(27 Hrs.)
CS 240 Computer Programming I 4 ___
CS 241 Computer Programming II 4 ___
CS 242 Computer Programming III 4 ___
CS 302 Client Server Databases 4 ___
CS 400 Data Structures & Algorithms 4 ___
CS 415 Soc. Implications of Comput. 3 ___
CS 466 Formal Languages 4 ___
B. Required Computer Engineering Courses
(16 Hrs.)
CEG 233 Linux and Windows 4 ___
CEG 320 Computer Organization 4 ___
CEG 355 Information Tech Systems 4 ___
CEG 460 Intro. to Software Engineering 4 ___
C. CS/CEG Electives (32 Hrs.)
At least 16 hours must be at the 400 level.
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
3. _____________________________ ___ ___
4. _____________________________ ___ ___
5. _____________________________ ___ ___
6. _____________________________ ___ ___
7. _____________________________ ___ ___
8. _____________________________ ___ ___
D. Technical Communication (3 Hrs.)
EGR 335 Technical Communications 3 ___
II. GENERAL EDUCATION (48 Hrs.)
Area I- Communication and Mathematical
Skills
ENG 101 - Composition I 4 ___
ENG 102 - Composition II 4 ___
Mathematics (see Quantitative Reasoning)
Area II – Cultural-Social Foundations-8 Hrs.
History – Select 1 Course:
CLS 150, HST 101, HST 102, HST 103
__________________________<strong><em>4 _</em></strong>
The Non Western World( WI)-Select 1 Course:
CSE/CST,RSE/RST,HLT202,SW272,URS 200
_
___________________________ 4 ____
Area III – Human Behavior – 8 Hrs.
Select Two Courses from Different Rows:
Economics: EC 200(Some WI), EC 290 (WI)
Political Science: PLS 200
Psychology: PSY 105
Sociology (WI): SOC200, SOC205
1._____________________________ 4 ___
2._____________________________ 4 ___
Area IV – Human Expression – 4 Hrs.
Select one course:
Great Books (WI):
CLS, ENG, PHL or REL 204
Fine and Performing Arts:
ART, MUS, TH 214, MP 131 or MUS 290
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
Area V – Natural Science – 12 Hrs.
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
3. _____________________________ ___ ___
Additional courses from Areas II, III, and IV-
8 Hrs.
Select one course from two of these three areas.
Except for Area II, the course selected must
come from a different subcategory than the
course(s) chosen to meet the area requirement.
(See under- graduate catalog-Gen. Ed. Section
for complete details).
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
2. _____________________________ 4 ___
Area VI – College Component (4 Hrs.)
Select any Area VI College of Liberal Arts
College Component Course.
_______________________________ 4 ___
III. QUANTITATIVE REASONING (17 Hrs.)
MTH 228 Calculus for Social Sciences 5 ___
MTH 257 Discrete Mathematics 3 ___
STT 160 Statistical Concepts 5 ___
PHL 223 Symbolic Logic 4 ___
IV. GENERAL ELECTIVES (40 Hrs.)
Must include at least two courses from COM
101, 203, 221 or PHL 124, 200, 211.
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
3. _____________________________ ___ ___
4. _____________________________ ___ ___
5. _____________________________ ___ ___
6. _____________________________ ___ ___
7. _____________________________ ___ ___
8. _____________________________ ___ ___
9. _____________________________ ___ ___
10. ____________________________ ___ ___</p>

<p>BSCS
I. COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGR COURSES
(86 Hrs.)
A. Required Computer Science Courses
(31 Hrs.)
CS 240 Computer Programming I 4 ___
CS 241 Computer Programming II 4 ___
CS 242 Computer Programming III 4 ___
CS 400 Data Structures and Algorithms 4 ___
CS 405 Intro to Data Base Man. Systems 4 ___
CS 415 Soc. Implications of Computing 3 ___
CS 466 Introduction to Formal Lang. 4 ___
CS 480 Comparative Languages 4 ___
B. Required Computer Engineering Courses
(16 Hrs.)
CEG 233 Linux and Windows 4 ___
CEG 320 Computer Organization 4 ___
CEG 433 Operating Systems I 4 ___
CEG 460 Intro. to Software Engineering 4 ___
C. CS/CEG Electives (36 Hrs.)
At least 16 hours must be at the 400 level.
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
3. _____________________________ ___ ___
4. _____________________________ ___ ___
5. _____________________________ ___ ___
6. _____________________________ ___ ___
7. _____________________________ ___ ___
8. _____________________________ ___ ___
9. _____________________________ ___ ___
D. Technical Communication (3 Hrs.)
EGR 335 Technical Communications 3 ___
NAME: ____________________________________
ADVISOR: _________________________________
MENTOR: __________________________________
Date: ____________
II. GENERAL EDUCATION (40 Hrs.)
Area I- Communication and Mathematical Skills
ENG 101 - Composition I 4 ___
ENG 102 - Composition II 4 ___
Mathematics (see required Math/Stat section)
Area II – Cultural-Social Foundations-8 Hrs.
History – Select 1 Course:
CLS 150, HST 101, HST 102, HST 103
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
The Non Western World(WI) – Select 1 Course:
CSE/CST, RSE/RST, HLT 202, SW 272, URS 200
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
Area III – Human Behavior – 8 Hrs.
Select 2 Courses From Different Rows:
Econ: EC200 (Some WI), EC 290 (WI)
Political Science: PLS 200
Psychology: PSY 105
Sociology (WI): SOC200, SOC205
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
2. _____________________________ 4 ___
Area IV – Human Expression – 4 Hrs.
Select one course:
Great Books (WI):
CLS, ENG, PHL or REL 204
Fine and Performing Arts:
ART, MUS or TH 214, MUS 290, MP 131
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
Additional courses from Areas II, III, and IV-8 Hrs.
Select one course from two of these three areas. Except for
Area II, the course selected must come from a different
subcategory than the course(s) chosen to meet the area
requirement. (See undergraduate catalog-Gen. Ed.
Section for
complete details).
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
2. _____________________________ 4 ___
Area VI – College Component 4 Hrs.
Select any Area VI College of Liberal Arts course.
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
III. MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE COURSES
(45 Hrs.)
A.Required Mathematics/Statistics Courses
(24 Hrs.)
MTH 229 Calculus I 5 ____
MTH 230 Calculus II 5 ____
MTH 231 Calculus III 5 ____
MTH 253 Matrix Algebra 3 ____
MTH 257 Discrete Mathematics 3 ____
STT 363, STT 360, or ISE 301 Statistics
1. _____________________________ ___
B. Science and Mathematics Electives (21 Hrs.)
Must include at least 18 hours of science courses, which
includes a three quarter laboratory science sequence
appropriate for science or engineering majors
Laboratory Sequence:
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
3. _____________________________ ___ ___
Additional Science/Math Course(s):
1. _____________________________ ___ ___
2. _____________________________ ___ ___
IV. GENERAL ELECTIVES (20 Hrs.)
Electives may be from any area of study based on policy
guidelines.
1. _____________________________ 4 ___
2. _____________________________ 4 ___
3. _____________________________ 4 ___
4. _____________________________ 4 ___
5. _____________________________ 4 ___</p>

<p>I did not do a detailed read through those degree requirements, but the simple answer is that if you pursue a BA instead of a BS, be prepared to explain why. Your answer (that you switched majors and the BS would delay graduation beyond what you could afford) is a good one. Explain that the big difference between majors seems to be the Math sequence, and as a former Math major (with presumably a good Math GPA), you're not afraid of those courses.</p>

<p>The apparent differences between the two programs are:</p>

<ul>
<li>One more required CS course and one more elective CS course.</li>
<li>Substitution of an apparently more in-depth database course.</li>
<li>Substitution of Operating Systems for IT Systems.</li>
<li>More and harder math courses (but you probably took the harder math courses anyway as a math major).</li>
<li>More and harder science courses.</li>
</ul>

<p>If you do go with the BA version, you may want to see if you can substitute the more in-depth database course, and if you can substitute Operating Systems for IT Systems. Try to include CS electives in Computer Networks, Algorithms and Complexity, and Security as well.</p>

<p>Since I remember hearing ABET accreditation hold very little value in the realm of CS, I don't see the reason to spend an extra year just to take some math courses you've seen before & play around in 3 physics/chem/bio courses w/ labs. I would go with the BA if it meant graduating that much earlier.</p>

<p>thanks to those that replied i appreciate your time and thoughts. I have not yet decided but i am leaning towards bscs, but am thinking about just getting the ba and coming back and taking the courses i need to get the bs so i will have two degrees</p>

<p>Can you do the BA version, but with the harder math (that you probably already took as a math major) and the CS courses of the BS version, but without the extra science courses, and graduate earlier than doing the full BS version?</p>

<p>The extra science courses are probably the least useful in terms of industry software jobs, unless you enter a job where computer software is applied to or uses something scientific (e.g. biology for bioinformatics software, physics for engineering or game software, etc.).</p>

<p>However, for science courses, even for the BA version, you probably want to take the "real" ones, not the "physics for poets" type of courses commonly offered to non-majors.</p>

<p>
[quote]
thanks to those that replied i appreciate your time and thoughts. I have not yet decided but i am leaning towards bscs, but am thinking about just getting the ba and coming back and taking the courses i need to get the bs so i will have two degrees

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Every schools I've seen will not allow that, so check with your school. Regardless, the second degree will not add value to your resume. If you're going to go back to school for another degree, get an MS.</p>

<p>Here is Wright State's policy on double degrees:</p>

<p>
[quote]
Double Degrees: Students who wish to earn a double baccalaureate degree at Wright State must complete the requirements for both majors and earn at least 45 hours beyond the minimum hours required for the first degree. Students will pay two graduation application fees, earn two degrees, and receive two diplomas.</p>

<p>Example: If you are pursuing a B.A. degree in History (which requires 192 hours) and a B.S. degree in Organizational Leadership, you must earn a minimum of 237 hours (192 for the first degree + 45 for the second degree) in order to meet the hours required to qualify for two bachelor degrees.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>College</a> of Liberal Arts - Wright State University</p>

<p>That said, I'm not even sure they would allow you to receive one degree, return, and use the credits from an already conferred degree towards another degree. Usually dual degree programs have to be done concurrently.</p>

<p>Edit: I realize that's not from the College of Engineering and Computer Science, but I'm willing to bet that it's a university-wide policy. You can contact the Registrar to verify.</p>

<p>Ummm....</p>

<p>I have to look at the B.S. Math and BSCS requirements later. Depending on the school, you can basically manufacture a CS degree out of a Math degree and qualify for many of the same software jobs out there.</p>

<p>CPeyton...</p>

<p>Wright State (if that is the school) has a B.S. Math with a Computing Option. It requires like 28 credits of CS. On top of that, you get about 30 credits as electives.</p>

<p>Very flexible program</p>

<p>I don't see an issue.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.math.wright.edu/pdfs/computing_math_cl.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.math.wright.edu/pdfs/computing_math_cl.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>An employer can see on your transcript what you have taken. On your resume it should say:</p>

<p>B.S. Mathematics (Computer Science option)</p>

<p>Now I would not be so bold (unless you someone like me who will push an envelope) and say:</p>

<p>B.S. Mathematics/Computer Science</p>

<p>...which has been on my resume since commencement. :-)</p>

<p>I wouldn't put "B.S. Mathematics/Computer Science" unless he double majored. I could see "B.S. Mathematics / Computer Science option" or "B.S. Mathematics with Computer Science option" but leaving off the word "option" gives the impression that he majored in Computer Science as well as Mathematics. That risks getting hired then having an HR rep rescind the offer for falsifying his resume.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I wouldn't put "B.S. Mathematics/Computer Science" unless he double majored. I could see "B.S. Mathematics / Computer Science option" or "B.S. Mathematics with Computer Science option" but leaving off the word "option" gives the impression that he majored in Computer Science as well as Mathematics. That risks getting hired then having an HR rep rescind the offer for falsifying his resume.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Actually, if he/she have taken the courses and it fits the description of a CS major (universally), then they can do it. You will need a REAL PICKY HR rep to get all huffy-and-puffy about that. For one, the "/" can mean dual (not double major). It's done a whole lot in this industry. It's VERY possible to satisfy both major within the same set of credits. U-Illinois and UCLA has Math graduate programs with so many cross-listed courses than one can take 3 math courses, 3 cs courses and 4 math/cs courses and fulfill both majors because the requirement is to take 7 courses of one area for the major.</p>

<p>Now would I do that as a fresh grad?....Nah. Do that later when one has more experience and companies have cannot wait as long to fill positions.</p>

<p>Are you kidding? HR reps look for absolutes. If you put "B.S. Mathematics/Computer Science" on your resume and they see "B.S. Mathematics" on your transcript, you're toast. It's like putting a GPA of 3.0 when you have a GPA on your transcript of 2.97. </p>

<p>I get that you can take the same courses in Major A to satisfy Major B. But there are ways to put that on a resume to make it clear:</p>

<p>B.S. Mathematics (Computer Science Option)
- Completed all major coursework for Mathematics and Computer Science</p>

<p>That's very clear without any appearance of deception. For a dual degree, you shouldn't put a slash: "B.S. Mathematics and B.S. Computer Science". They're distinct bachelor's degrees so they should be acknowledged separately.</p>

<p>About the time we start reviewing transcripts, we have asked all types of technical questions, had them draw out scenarios on boards and already decided if the candidate is a good fit.</p>

<p>We will not care by then if so-and-so was a B.S. Math only, B.S. Math with CS concentration, CS only or a Nuclear Physics major who used all their electives in CS and put on their resume Physics/CS.</p>

<p>When there are more jobs than applicants, absolutes goes out the window. That is why I love this industry. You can make pretty damn good money and get hired and not even have to have all the requirements/GPA. That is why many software development job requirements say "CS, Math or related degree". If it's related and they know the technology and can prove their experience, we don't care.</p>

<p>How do you think all of these "beltway bandits" (fed consulting companies) pop up. Furthermore, as a recruiter, you better be able to explain to the Program Management Directors why this other company found the "hires" and won the contract and your company did not? </p>

<p>Saying that "well I was looking absolute CS majors only" will not cut it.</p>