Baseball as an EC?

<p>Hey guys,
I'm a student going into his Junior year in high school. I have a 4.0 unweighted GPA through Freshman/Sophomore year and will be pursuing IB diploma in Junior and Senior year. I've played baseball my entire life, in the most competitive league in the state. I have some ECs besides this, but due to the massive time commitment all year long for baseball, (especially in the summer, when most people do ECs) I am worried i may not look as "competitive" to top schools as people who have ~1000 volunteer hours. I've noticed that most people in this forum applying to top schools have very similar ECs. (e.g. music, tennis, cross country, volunteering, math competitions..)
Anyways, my question remains: Will playing baseball on both a top-tier school and select club team set me apart from my peers? Thanks!</p>

<p>If you're good at baseball and it is your passion, then list it including the select team, school team, whatever else you do. I don't know if it will set you apart but it does count as a serious EC that adcom's will view as a passion. You can also talk about baseball, including the commitment it's taken, in an essay.</p>

<p>Only if you can get recruited to play.</p>

<p>"I've noticed that most people in this forum applying to top schools have very similar ECs. (e.g. music, tennis, cross country, volunteering, math competitions..)"</p>

<p>Exactly. That's why your serious accomplishment and dedication to baseball sets you apart and above those other applicants. Are you a collegiate level caliber player? If you are -- your 4.0 GPA and baseball will put you in a very very nice situation. </p>

<p>There will only be a handful of top scholar, hi performing baseballers out there. There are tons of science/tennis/piano applicants each and every year.</p>

<p>May I suggest putting up some queries here?
Athletic</a> Recruits - College Confidential</p>

<p>Frankly, you're in an enviable position... good luck to you and continue your great academics!</p>

<p>OP: If you want to get recruited to play in college, the process really begins Sept. 1st when coaches can send e-mails back if you choose to e-mail them. It's a frustrating (coaches, as one wise poster once said, are the masters of ambiguity) but ultimately rewarding process which I myself just yesterday pretty much concluded. If you would like some insight on athletic recruiting at the Ivy League schools feel free to shoot me a PM.</p>

<p>If you choose not to pursue college baseball (though if you're really focusing on summer ball I'd almost think you have a desire to play at the next level), baseball will certainly suffice as an EC but it's not something that will really set you apart. Do what you love though; that tends to work things out in the end.</p>

<p>monstor: but don't you think a 4.0 GPA IB student who excels at baseball is rather out of the norm?</p>

<p>^ 4.0 at an IB is certainly a heck of an achievement in itself. Without being able to actually see a player, though, we have no idea how good he really is or how much dedication he really puts into his sport.

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Anyways, my question remains: Will playing baseball on both a top-tier school and select club team set me apart from my peers? Thanks!

[/quote]

He could be the starting catcher for the East Cobb Braves and on preseason All-American lists. He could be the team waterboy who sees playing time 2 innings a year. We don't really know, and I don't think college adcoms would be able to figure that out either unless he specifically goes to college to play his sport. I raise the question, athletic recruiting aside: What makes baseball a more remarkable EC for a 4.0 IB student than something like Model UN, time commitment, passion, and ability being equal?</p>

<p>
[quote]
I raise the question, athletic recruiting aside: What makes baseball a more remarkable EC for a 4.0 IB student than something like Model UN, time commitment, passion, and ability being equal?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>While I think time commitment and passion are flawed measures with which to place value on ECs, what sets one applicant apart from another, equally qualified (if you can even compare ability levels in different fields) is the college's own needs. Top colleges will see many, many kids who do well in MUN, but there are only so many future diplomats they can accept. A baseball player, assuming he's recruited (you can't really answer your question without assuming he's recruitable or at least desirable as a baseball player), offers something much fewer applicants offer.</p>

<p>^ Well of course; heck I've yet to enter my senior year and I pretty much know where I'm going to school so I know the power of baseball recruiting. I also know that the process is not easy and that there are a lot more kids who think they can play at the next level than there are kids who can. Of course this is contingent on the OP's interest in playing at the next level; he's not the least bit recruit-able or desirable if it is not his hope to play at the next level (and it really isn't for everyone who is qualified to do so; there is a much bigger time commitment at the collegiate level than there is at even the highest echelons of high school ball.</p>

<p>I don't see that the OP was asking if or how to get recruited to play college ball. He asked, is the major time dedication to one EC a detriment when compared to applicants presenting a laundry list of ECs. On that question I think the short answer is no; having only one major EC while maintaining a 4.0 and pursuing an IB track is not a problem. </p>

<p>From my perspective an individual committing 25 hours a week to a single EC is more intriguing than someone who is spending 5 hours per week on 5 ECs. Many accomplished high school musicians have a similar "problem"; the amount of time devoted to lessons, practicing and preparation reveal a true commitment to their interests and talent. The fact that most will never go on to play in college or professionally is irrelevant. What is relevant is that the EC shows you are willing and capable of dedicating yourself to a particular activity - a skill that is easily transferable to the rigors of college classwork.</p>

<p>You have absolutely nothing to worry about! Baseball is a great EC. Plus, you have volunteering and math competitions so you're well rounded.</p>