BB WR help EXPERTS!

<p>At the conclusion of the novel The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway, a young Midwesterner recently (A: arrived to) New York, (B:moodily) (C:watches) the blinking green light at the (D:tip of) Long Island. (E:No Error)</p>

<p>I get why A is the answer, since "arrived in" would make sense.
However, I still don't get how the past form of the verb "arrive" makes sense with the whole sentence. The phrase "recently arrived in New York" is an adjective phrase describing "a young Midwesterner," which means that there is a passive form of the verb "arrive": namely, "be arrived in."
This doesn't make sense to me. .. "A young Midwesterner" cannot "recently be arrived in New York."</p>

<p>I think we should put "who" there, to make: "... Nick Carraway, a young Midwesterner who recently arrived in NY..."</p>

<p>Right?? help!</p>

<p>At the conclusion of the novel The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway, a young man recently arriving in New York, moodily watches the blinking green light at the tip of Long Island.</p>

<p>^ No, I don't think you're right.</p>

<p>"Arrived in" is a past participle, or adjective phrase, that can correctly describe the young Midwesterner. Try replacing it with a different past participle: "Nick Carraway, a young Midwesterner recently taken to New York, moodily watches the blinking green light...."</p>

<p>"Taken to" is more often used this way and so sounds better to us, but the two phrases serve the same grammatical purpose.</p>

<p>:( </p>

<p>aw10char</p>

<p>okay :)
@Daisie,</p>

<p>but still, the verb "arrive" is never used in a passive form. We might say that someone "was taken to" somewhere, but we never say that someone "was arrived in" somewhere... I'm still confused</p>

<p>At the conclusion of the novel The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway, a young Midwesterner (who recently arrived at) New York, moodily watches the blinking green light at the tip of Long Island. </p>

<p>I think it is(who recently arrived at) because (a young Midwesterner) would be an adjective clause describing (who) ,which can act as the subject of the verb (arrived).
(recently) is an adverb that must modify a verb, adverb, adjective ;the only verb it can modify is (arrived).</p>

<p>Im sure 100% about (at) but not about (who). (Arrived at) is an idiom that I memorized.</p>

<p>Thats it....:D:D:D
Hope this helped you
If someone has a better idea ,please explain it in this post.</p>

<p>thanx realityisadream!
i thought about "who" as well but usually, collegeboard underlines the part in which the adjustment can occur .. anyways, thanx! :)</p>

<p>^ You are welcome. I will help you anytime you want. :):):)</p>