Being ahead = good?

<p>Say Student A and B are both juniors. Pretend they both have the same grades for same classes except: </p>

<p>Student A has precalc honors this year and will have a final grade of A-</p>

<p>Student B had precalc honors last year and had a final grade of B-. This year student B is in Calc. </p>

<p>My question is, how would colleges look at this? Would colleges favor student A or B more? Would there be a difference at all? etc?</p>

<p>Student A because he has better grades. Being ahead is good if you can handle it but if you can't handle it there's no reason to be ahead.</p>

<p>Student B is better.</p>

<p>Student A is better.</p>

<p>A 'B' is worse for you than one not "ahead" class but still honors.</p>

<p>Student A, just because you're ahead doesn't mean you're a better student.</p>

<p>Student B because I myself talked to an admissions rep for a highly competitive college and they said they'd much rather see a B in a hard class than an A in an easier one. It's also generally more preferred that you challenge yourself and strive to do your best in a class (even though it may not be an A) that is more difficult.</p>

<p>Definitely student A. Student A can take more advanced math classes between high school and a university.</p>

<p>
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Student B because I myself talked to an admissions rep for a highly competitive college and they said they'd much rather see a B in a hard class than an A in an easier one. It's also generally more preferred that you challenge yourself and strive to do your best in a class (even though it may not be an A) that is more difficult.

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Everything I've ever heard was to the contrary... including from college representatives.</p>

<p>What if I took precalc in 8th grade through a university and got a B+?</p>

<p>Change student B's precalc grade to an A. Now what?</p>