Biggest ED bump among the ivies?

<p>I posted in this forum because I have a broken wrist and I was here already. self-explanatory topic hopefully</p>

<p>Here you go:
Ivy</a> League College Admissions Facts and Statistics</p>

<p>It's Dartmouth with 35% ED vs. 13% RD. At no other school is the ED rate more than double RD.</p>

<p>thx yo 10ch</p>

<p>Don't apply ED to a school just for a potential boost, though.</p>

<p>I'll be happy with any ivy at this point. I feel like I'm not competative enough to have a choice. I'll prolly just apply to 17 schools RD and maybe columbia ED, cuz it looks like theres a boost there too.</p>

<p>@HIGHreachNoob - ur doing it wrong</p>

<p>how else should I maximize my chances at getting into at least one top school?</p>

<p>The point is not to try to get into the highest ranked school possible. The point is to find a school that's a good fit for you. Maybe that's Columbia or Dartmouth, but maybe not. Spend your time researching and visiting schools -- some "reaches," some "matches," some "safeties" -- and find some in each of those categories that you think you'd really like to attend. </p>

<p>Applying to all the ivies because they're "ivies" is truly not the way to go, if you'd like to maximize your future happiness.</p>

<p>I don't think you can get to know a school just by visiting it and talking to people. Any affection one might feel for a school just after an hour-long tour is superficial. I think I could fit into any top school, honestly. Others might feel differently, of course, but I just want to get into a good school at this point.</p>

<p>If you are applying to schools because you "just want to get into a good school at this point," chances are these schools will be able to see that you don't truly belong there.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I think I could fit into any top school, honestly.

[/quote]

Then you don't know yourself very well.</p>

<p>There are very few people who would be equally happy at MIT, Stanford, Williams and Swarthmore. These are all top schools, but wildly different when it comes to student body, course offerings, size, feel, etc.</p>

<p>(And to be clear - I'm not arguing that there's "one perfect school" for you. Or that you'd be miserable if you went to Columbia, and constantly happy if you went to Dartmouth. I'm just saying that there are a broad range of schools, and if you do some soul-searching, I'm sure you'll find some categories (i.e. urban, LAC, New England, hippy, etc.) that appeal to you more than others).</p>

<p>OK, I can narrow it down to schools that by their very nature can help me get into a T10 law school. I'm not picky as to weather or population density.</p>

<p>IDK, I just don't see the problem with applying to all the Ivies, Stanford, Georgetown, Wash U, Duke, and Notre Dame. Why limit myself? If I get into more than one, I'll do research then. If I get in nowhere, I'll go to U of Illinois, which is a good school, as well. Thanks for the advice, though, I appreciate it.</p>

<p>It just seems you are a desperate to get into an Ivy League school as if Ivy League = Success.
The college shouldn't shape you, your shape should fit into the college as much as possible. That's how success and great achievements happen. Don't be afflicted by external sources so much. Impose yourself.</p>

<p>^Good advice. Although, you could have "Ivy league school" as a condition when you come to compile your list of schools. Don't be too upset if none of the ivies fit your character. And to echo everyone else, don't pick a school just because it's an ivy; you could very easily end up miserable if you're admitted and choose to attend.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I don't think you can get to know a school just by visiting it and talking to people. Any affection one might feel for a school just after an hour-long tour is superficial.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>HIGHreach has got a point. Saying that you're interested in schools with name cachet or high magazine rankings usually draws critiques on CC. But prospective students who gush over how "friendly" a campus is or how it felt like such a great fit, often get away unchallenged with proposing that a major life decision be based upon their interaction with a tenth of one percent of the students at a given school.</p>