Black people?

<p>I hope no one takes this thread offensively...I just want to know what other African-American students are considering Princeton for 2014 admission. Not that I'm discriminatory against any other races, I just want to know that I'm not the only black person lol. Most of my schools had multicultural weekends for black or other minority students in general. I'm surprised Princeton doesn't...
So any black people lol? I just want to know who else is out there :-)</p>

<p>In my opinion, holding a multicultural weekend constitutes the implicit admission of a problem - that your school isn't naturally friendly enough to students of color and therefore needs to work harder to attract their interest/assuage their fears.</p>

<p>I understand your perspective, but I personally just like them because it's another opportunity to see some of the people you could potentially go to school with in the future...idk. Either way, I just want to know who else is out there! lol</p>

<p>There are DEFINITELY plenty of African Americans there. I went to the Princeton Preview weekend, and attended the multicultural panel, and african americans are very well represented</p>

<p>lol@ this thread. Of course black ppl go to Princeton</p>

<p>"In my opinion, holding a multicultural weekend constitutes the implicit admission of a problem - that your school isn't naturally friendly enough to students of color and therefore needs to work harder to attract their interest/assuage their fears."</p>

<p>Or that an elite institution realizes that it may inadvertently create an intimidating environment for students of color from low-income households, and it wishes to make them feel welcome, to create a feeling of solidarity, in whatever way it can...</p>

<p>And what of white students from low-income households? Chopped liver?</p>

<p>Also, it's kind of illogical to be swayed by those multicultural events. Seeing a bunch of black people at an admitted students event doesn't change the fact that Princeton is 8% black. In fact, you might be encouraging self-segregation by wooing ethnic students who prioritize being around other ethnic students and/or need to be around ethnic students in order to be comfortable.</p>

<p>Hey, guys, leave jobes alone. You have no right to tell him he has no right to his feelings. Just answer the question. Yes, there is a large and engaged community of African Americans at Princeton. You might look up a parent on cc, Drosselmeier, and ask him what his daughter thought about her experience. My kids are Caucasian, but I was struck on every visit on how integrated and active the community appears to be.</p>

<p>Jobes--you might want to contact another poster, justadream92, who apparently is a multicultural student who just visited Princeton for Princeton Previews and had a wonderful time.</p>

<p>"And what of white students from low-income households?"</p>

<p>Typically, these students are invited to "diversity" open houses and "diversity" accepted students weekends. It's not as if persons of European descent are barred from attending these events.</p>

<p>"In fact, you might be encouraging self-segregation by wooing ethnic students who prioritize being around other ethnic students and/or need to be around ethnic students in order to be comfortable."</p>

<p>Yes, but self-segregation is a tragic, inevitable end for some members of certain ethnic groups, notably black Americans and Asian Americans.</p>