Blue Book Questions

<p>I am having trouble understanding why I got some of the questions in the blue book wrong. I'm going to post a few here and if you have the blue book, I would appreciate some help on explaining them. Also, I'll post the ones I don't understand if they are Math/Writing.</p>

<p>Secondly, why is the 4th test and beyond score ranges instead of exact curves? Did they get lazy or were the first 3 just real tests?</p>

<p>Here are two questions I had that made me make this thread:</p>

<p>Practice Test 4, Section 2, Reading, #12: The back says this is an easy question, but the answer is a little strange. It never mentions her father being a role model to her, only mentioning that she had to live up to his fame. I marked A, but that isn't a good answer either so they all seemed wrong to me :P</p>

<p>Same Section, #16: The answer is D, but I thought E was right because the lack of records support the idea that people don't know the state of women, not that they were set back. D actually supports the diminished status because it talks about how only the really high class women were separate, the majority were disparaged.</p>

<p>
[quote]
why is the 4th test and beyond score ranges instead of exact curves? Did they get lazy or were the first 3 just real tests?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>In the 2nd edition (probably the one you have), the first three tests were administered in the past, and the next seven are practice tests made by CB.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Practice Test 4, Section 2, Reading, #12: The back says this is an easy question, but the answer is a little strange. It never mentions her father being a role model to her, only mentioning that she had to live up to his fame. I marked A, but that isn't a good answer either so they all seemed wrong to me :P

[/quote]
</p>

<p>C is the best answer.
A, B, and D are not mentioned in the passage.
E is deliberately wrong. Her father warned her how hard becoming a doctor would be.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Same Section, #16: The answer is D, but I thought E was right because the lack of records support the idea that people don't know the state of women, not that they were set back. D actually supports the diminished status because it talks about how only the really high class women were separate, the majority were disparaged.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Question: All of the following are referred to in Passage 1 as evidence of women's diminished social status in Victorian England EXCEPT the...</p>

<p>E is clearly mentioned in the passage. Look at lines 50-53.
Although the passage briefly mentions Queen Victoria, there is no reference to her influence in women's diminished status.</p>

<p>Thanks although I feel like the point of mentioning the queen was to make the point that the average women was disparaged socially as opposed to the smaller aristocracy. The passage is all about middle class women, so why did they bring that up?</p>

<p>I think its funny how I got only 2 wrong and they are the easy and medium ones :P</p>

<p>The sentence in lines 3-7 is the only reference to Queen Victoria (Tell me if you see any other references).</p>

<p>
[quote]
In nineteenth century England, middle-class women were usually assigned domestic roles and faced severely limited professional career options. Of course, one can point to England's monarch, Queen Victoria, as a famous example of a woman at work, and millions of working-class women worked for wages in factories and private homes, on farms, and in stores and markets. But aristocrats were often exempt from societal strictures that bound the middle class, and working-class women were usually looked down on as not being respectable' for their efforts as workers.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That particular sentence is only used to show how there was one person who was a powerful woman. It's saying, "Oh, see? ONLY one. That proves my point that women really did have limited professional career options." It has absolutely nothing to do with the influence of the queen. The queen did not influence women's diminished social status.</p>

<p>Okay, thanks for the help.</p>

<p>Another question: </p>

<p>During a sale, a customer can buy one shirt for x dollars. Each additional shirt the customer buys costs z dollars less than the first shirt. For example, the second shirt is x-z dollars. Which of the following represents the customer's cost, in dollars for n shirts bought during the sale?</p>

<p>Answer: x + (n-1)(x-z)</p>

<p>Could someone quickly explain what the n-1 is for?</p>

<p>n is the number of shirts.
n-1 is used to exclude the first shirt which was bought at a more expensive price.</p>

<p>There are 75 more women than men enrolled in Linden college. If there are n men enrolled, then, in terms of n, what percent of those enrolled are men?</p>

<p>Answer: 100n/(2n+75)%</p>

<p>Why is there a 2? This seems very simple so I said the answer was, 100n/(n+75)%</p>

<p>Even when I plug numbers in, I get different answers for n/total students and the correct formula's answer. When I plug in two, the percent is less for the correct answer's formula even though I see no flaw in just divided 2 by 77 (men/total students).</p>

<p>Edit: Googled it and found it, should have done that first ;)</p>

<p>page 652 #8</p>

<p>totally lost and have no idea how to start</p>

<p>Got it! Didn't notice the two points at f(x) = 5 </p>

<p>I always get confused on functions since they don't outright call f(x) = y.</p>

<p>Go to this site Welcome</a> to the Official SAT Study Guide Book Owner's Area. It has the answers and explanations to all the practice tests.</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
There are 75 more women than men enrolled in Linden college. If there are n men enrolled, then, in terms of n, what percent of those enrolled are men?</p>

<p>Answer: 100n/(2n+75)%</p>

<p>Why is there a 2? This seems very simple so I said the answer was, 100n/(n+75)%</p>

<p>Even when I plug numbers in, I get different answers for n/total students and the correct formula's answer. When I plug in two, the percent is less for the correct answer's formula even though I see no flaw in just divided 2 by 77 (men/total students).</p>

<p>Edit: Googled it and found it, should have done that first

[/QUOTE]
</p>

<p>Could you please explain? I did the same thing, and I plugged in numbers, and the wrong formula (according to the answerkey) always gave the right percentage, while the right formula gave the wrong percentage.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Could you please explain? I did the same thing, and I plugged in numbers, and the wrong formula (according to the answerkey) always gave the right percentage, while the right formula gave the wrong percentage.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>n = number of men
number of women = n+75</p>

<p>[n/(n+n+75)] * 100% or 100n/(2n+75)</p>

<p>n+n+75 is the total number of people enrolled in Linden college.
You also did the plug in wrong.</p>

<p>Let there be 25 men and 100 women (25+75).
(25/125) * 100% = 20%</p>

<p>The correct formula 100n/(2n+75) gives you (100<em>25)/[2(25)+75] = 2500/125 = 20%
The incorrect formula 100n/(n+75)% gives you (100</em>25)/(25+75) = 25%</p>

<p>Thanks JeffreyJung!</p>

<p>Alright, I scored around 700 on the first 3 Practice Tests in the Math section, on tests 4 and 5 I've gotten between 500-600. Is it possible that these are harder?</p>

<p>Here's a question that they call medium, but I am totally clueless even when I go back and stare at it for a half hour.</p>

<p>If 18√18 = r√t, where r and t are both positive integers and r > t, which of the following could be the value of rt?
a) 18
b) 36
c) 108
d) 162
e) 324</p>

<p>
[quote]
If 18√18 = r√t, where r and t are both positive integers and r > t, which of the following could be the value of rt?
a) 18
b) 36
c) 108
d) 162
e) 324

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Do you know the rule: √(ab) = √(a) * √(b)</p>

<p>18√18 = 18√(9*2) = 54√2</p>

<p>54*2 = 108.</p>

<p>Oh I actually did get the 18√18 side into 54√2, but I didn't know that that that got me the answer.</p>

<p>if x^2 - y^2 = 77 and x+y = 11, what is the value of x?</p>

<p>Given: x² - y² = 77; difference of two squares
x + y = 11</p>

<p>x² - y² = (x-y)(x+y) = 11(x-y)</p>

<p>x - y = 7
x + y = 11; Add equations</p>

<p>2x = 18;
x = 9;</p>

<p>Tip: CB really LOVES these kinds of problems. When you see difference of two squares, you know you have to expand.</p>

<p>Tyvm again! </p>

<p>Last question and I'll stop for now ;) </p>

<p>Page 598, #18: Not sure how to do this problem quickly as well as problems similar to it.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Page 598, #18: Not sure how to do this problem quickly as well as problems similar to it.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>This is a counting problem. CB also loves these kinds of problems.</p>

<p>For the sake of explaining, let the fives cards be A B C D E, and C is never at either end.</p>

<p>For the card at the left end: there are 4 possibilities since C is excluded
For the card at the right end: there are 3 possibilities since C is excluded
For the second card from the right: there are 3 possibilities since C is included now
For the second card from the left: 2 possibilities
Middle: 1</p>

<p>4 * 3 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 72 Possibilities</p>

<p>Try some more counting problems:</p>

<p>How many ways can Jack, Susie, Ken, Jeff, and Maria be arranged in a line so that Jeff is never in the middle?</p>

<p>The number 8558 is an example of a positive, four-digit EVEN palindrome. (A palindrome is a number that has the same value when you reverse its digits.) How many such numbers are there?</p>

<p>Don't stop!! I love these problems..</p>

<p>Wait, I still don't understand where the first 3 comes from and why they all get multiplied together.</p>